Each year, the Vienna International Motor Symposium showcases some of the up-and-coming technologies automakers are engineering for the use in passenger cars, and Volkswagen AG CEO Martin Winterkorn revealed some big developments VW is working on for its future products. Winterkorn discussed a multi-faceted approach that VW is looking to reduce its fleet fuel consumption and exhaust emissions.

Some of the bigger news he discussed included a "high-performance" diesel engine that will produce 134 horsepower per liter and a 10-speed DSG automatic transmission. While no specific applications were mentioned, we can only hope this is for the Audi R4 we keep hearing about.

Another topic he touched on that caused us to perk up our ears was had to do with VW's plug-in hybrid technology. While we know the PHEV versions of the Audi A3 and Porsche Panamera are on the way, Winterkorn also said that these two models will be followed up by Golf, Passat, Audi A6 and Porsche Cayenne plug-in models. Scroll down for a press release highlighting the automaker's future fuel-saving initiatives.
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VOLKSWAGEN PRESENTS FUTURE DRIVE SYSTEMS AT VIENNA SYMPOSIUM

-Group Chairman announces 10-speed DSG and high-performance diesel engine
-Plug-in hybrid most promising alternative drive system
-Natural gas vehicles offer great potential for sustained mobility

Vienna/Wolfsburg, 26 April 2013: Today at the 34th International Vienna Motor Symposium Prof. Dr. Martin Winterkorn, Chairman of the Board of Management of Volkswagen AG, gave a forecast of future drive system technologies. Areas of work being focussed on by Volkswagen include the development of a high-performance diesel engine delivering 100kW per litre of displacement and a new 10-speed dual clutch gearbox that reduces fuel consumption. Among the alternative drive systems plug-in hybrids in particular offer great potential.

Winterkorn stressed that over the medium and long-term different drive system technologies would exist side by side. These would range from highly efficient internal combustion engines and natural gas systems all the way to hybrids and electric vehicles. On this basis the Volkswagen Group was working towards its declared objective of lowering the European new car fleet's CO2 emission level to 95g of CO2/km by 2020.

Winterkorn emphasised that existing internal combustion engines still offer a lot of potential: 'Since the year 2000, we've reduced the fuel consumption of our TDI and TSI engines by more than 30 per cent. I'm convinced that by 2020 we can achieve further increases in efficiency of around 15 per cent.' Factors making this possible, he said, would include enhancement of the combustion process, intelligent lightweight design, innovative operating strategies and optimisation of friction levels and thermal management.

Volkswagen also sees great potential for natural gas drive systems: 'The gas engine is environmentally friendly, economical and suitable for everyday use. The technology is fully developed and the vehicles are already on the market.' The best example is the new eco-up! - at 79g of CO2/km the world's most economical natural gas car. The Volkswagen Group will be systematically rolling out natural gas technology with the Golf TGI BlueMotion and the Audi A3 g-tron. Winterkorn: 'We need to make the public even more aware of the benefits of natural gas engines. Everyone needs to play their part in this: carmakers, politicians and the fuel industry.'

The variety of drive system technologies is growing: the group-wide Volkswagen modular component system and its flexible architecture enable every kind of drive system to be integrated quickly into the new models. 'Over the coming years we will electrify all vehicle classes in this way and help electrically powered motoring to make the breakthrough,' added Winterkorn.

In the medium term the first choice in terms of alternative drive systems is plug-in hybrid technology. This enables a purely electric range of up to 50 kilometres, a high level of suitability for everyday use by virtue of recharging from a socket at home and also complete flexibility for long journeys thanks to an efficient internal combustion engine. The Volkswagen Group's first plug-in hybrids, the Porsche Panamera and Audi A3 e-tron, will shortly be going into full production. They will be followed by the Golf and many other models, such as the Passat, Audi A6 and Porsche Cayenne.

Volkswagen also presented at the symposium new technologies that are finding their way into the modular diesel component system's future engine generation. These high-performance diesel engines achieve peak power output of 100kW per litre of displacement and have a variable valve-train assembly, a high-pressure injection system at up to 3,000 bar and combined charging with the innovative e-booster.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 55 Comments
      Marus
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wait 10 speed DSG? I hv a 13 speed girl-friend!
      strykerzzzz
      • 1 Year Ago
      I think the car companies are engaged in transmission wars. Watch for a company like ZF to go ahead and introduce an 11 or 12 speed transmission, just because people will want to have it in their car to boast about. You have room to grow more gears in a RWD car, but you'd think they would run out of room for the FWD and AWD versions.
        Myself
        • 1 Year Ago
        @strykerzzzz
        Exactly. We had megapixel wars in cameras to the point when adding pixels (without increasing sensor physical size) lowered the photo quality. Phone screen sizes are making it impossible to operate them with one hand... But moron customers think that higher number is always better....
      k.naz
      • 1 Year Ago
      Isn't there a point where more gears equals heavier transmission other that the supposed "9" or "10" speed limit? P.S. Yes, I know trucks have more.
        Joeseph Hahn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @k.naz
        beyond 8 speed is not efficient claim was for the traditional automatic transmission. (i think it was ZF who claimed that after 8 speed, there will be more than two planetary gears need to be engaged which will reduce the efficiency, but dsg does not have that issue. i think that is one of the reason why european and korean companies opted the dsg over cvt which japanese companies prefer
      Lachmund
      • 1 Year Ago
      10 speed DSG makes no sense for a possible "self shifter" like the R4. would only make sense for an automatic version imho
      ksrcm
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is very interesting. The company that is striving to become #1 (and it already IS number one in some parameters) decided to put R&D money into more than 7-speed dual clutch transmission AND in 140 hp/liter diesel ... what does that tell you? To me, it tells me that proper car will not be built before they get a nice huge return from that investment - which is probably 15-20 years away from today. The proper car having NO transmission and using NO fuel to power 4 electric motors - one on each wheel. Wall St , you better take note. Elon, sorry for your luck.
        Myself
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ksrcm
        Largest by what parameters? The number of assoholic press statements?
          ksrcm
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Myself
          No. I believe I remember from that article about how terribly VW looks at the paper by BS standards (that would be for Business Schools, not the "other" BS although too often I fail to see the difference) - largest operating profit - most spent on R&D - largest number of workers
      strykerzzzz
      • 1 Year Ago
      Why did ZF give up making CVTs and just go with developing the high gear transmissions? I have a co-worker who brags about his Ford Freestyle (with ZF CVT) that now has almost 275,000 miles without any engine and transmission problems.
        oRenj9
        • 1 Year Ago
        @strykerzzzz
        CVTs have some significant drawbacks; while theoretically it is the most efficient transmission design, their typical implementation results in inefficiencies and weaknesses. Nissan's CVT, for example, uses a large belt to transfer power between the pulleys in the transmission. A traditional automatic is pretty damn close to the theoretical maximum efficiency after 8 gears or so. It is very likely that in real-world applications, an 8 speed auto is just as efficient as a CVT while being able to handle more power. Economics might play a part in the decision as well. I'm not sure what the manufacturing costs are for a CVT compared to a traditional auto, but traditional autos are probably much cheaper to manufacture if for nothing more than shear economies of scale.
      Kakashi
      • 1 Year Ago
      Nope, not even close. GM's 6speed RWD and FWD arenot like ZF in any way shape or form. All your comment is kind of wrong.. sorry.
      Hello, Brian
      • 1 Year Ago
      It will be revolutionary if they actually get 134 hp/liter out of a production diesel. My interest is piqued.
      desinerd1
      • 1 Year Ago
      Corolla's 4 speed gearbox beats CrapWagen's 6 speed in fuel economy.
        Joe
        • 1 Year Ago
        @desinerd1
        Kick that boat anchor for a five cylinder motor that the Jetta is saddled with and I bet that would quickly change
        Lachmund
        • 1 Year Ago
        @desinerd1
        oh man...another VW news and soon the trolls come out of their cave. give us a rest, you bore us to death.
        Hello, Brian
        • 1 Year Ago
        @desinerd1
        The VW is a larger, heavier car with almost 40 more hp. It is not a direct comparison. Besides, VWs tend to substantially exceed their mileage ratings.
      Actionable Mango
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'm pretty sure Spinal Tap has commissioned an engineer to make a transmission that will go to 11.
        karman876
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Actionable Mango
        Bell's already has one that goes to 11. http://www.ratebeer.com/beer/bells-this-one-goes-to-11-ale/185161/
      Marus
      • 1 Year Ago
      I was a previous Golf owner, then Scirocco. Now a Nissan Leaf owner. The Leaf is so much a better car. Its really the iMac of cars. VW is dragging their feet. Trying to milk the combustion engine for another hundred years? Where is the electric Golf or Beetle? EV tech is mature and here to stay. Next I look fwd to the BMW i3.
        Lachmund
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Marus
        i like all efforts for electric cars but good lucking going on vacation with your leaf.
        Jim
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Marus
        What do you do if you need to travel 300 miles in about 4 hours? Get a bus? To just toss away the ICE is something I'd expect from someone who compares a car to an iMac. Get the newest thing even if its benefits are minimal. It will be a sad day when the technology that shaped the world is abandoned.
        strada_gt
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Marus
        Try to run your Leaf on an autobahn and you'll soon learn why they still prefer combustion engines.
        Hello, Brian
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Marus
        EV tech is wonderful for inner city, short distance driving; however, it is not yet mature for intercity travel. Tesla has come closest, but that amount of energy storage is still hugely expensive, and out of reach for 95% of the car buying public. Until a Leaf can go 300+ miles on a charge, and take substantially less time to charge (or allow for a swappable battery pack), it won't be interesting to most people.
      Andy Smith
      • 1 Year Ago
      I heard that BMW was considering a 10sp manual, except their driver's right arms would be too busy to engage in pleasuring themselves as they drive.
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