2013 Nissan Leaf
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf

  • Update caption.
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf solar panel
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf solar panel

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf wheel
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf wheel

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf headlight
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf headlight

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf front interior
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf front interior

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf steering wheel
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf steering wheel

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf dash
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf dash

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf dash
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf dash

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf shifter
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf shifter

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf rear seats
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf rear seats

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf cupholders
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf cupholders

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf infotainment screen
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf infotainment screen

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf interior
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf interior

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf rear interior
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf rear interior

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf rear interior
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf rear interior

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf charging plug
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf charging plug

  • 2013 Nissan Leaf charging plug
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf

The California legislature may do what the feds have been unable to do – create a permanent tax credit for buyers of super efficient vehicles, including electric, hybrid, plug-in hybrid-electric, and natural gas.

The lunacy of federal tax credits is that the $7,500 credit disappears once a manufacturer has sold 200,000 eligible plug-in electric vehicles. Years ago, for hybrids, it was only 60,000 and that's why there is no more federal money for buying a Toyoa Prius or Ford Fusion or Escape hybrids, but there are credits on the recently-introduced Prius plug-in and Ford C Max Energi.

The California bill (Assembly Bill 1077), by Assemblyman Al Muratuschi of Hermosa Beach, would use existing incentives to lower the cost of all alternative fuel vehicle purchases by reducing state sales taxes. The bill would reduce the sales tax due on an alt-fuel vehicle to what would be required of a "comparable conventional fuel vehicle, as determined by the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission." The bill is supported by EV advocates, including California utilities, automakers like (surprise) Nissan and General Motors and environmental groups.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • Share This Photo X