Electrovaya, the Canadian lithium-ion battery maker, is ready to go full speed ahead on battery production after cutting its output and improving its technology.

The company, which is launching its SuperPolymer 2.0, specifically says the new battery is less prone to fire risk because of, among other things, its ability to operate within a wider temperature range and better manage its internal temperature changes. The battery, which can be used for boats, and for residential and grid storage, in addition to plug-in vehicles, is subject to a "large and growing sales pipeline." You can find Electrovaya's press release below.

Electrovaya, whose original SuperPolymer battery was originally tested on prototype Ram plug-in hybrid pickups as far back as 2010, appears to be looking to quell fears that plug-in vehicles may pose a higher fire risk than conventional cars and trucks. Mitsubishi recently stopped production of its Outlander plug-in hybrid-electric SUV because of overheating issues, while the Japanese automaker last month briefly stopped making the i-MiEV electric vehicle while it researched the cause of a battery fire.
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ELECTROVAYA LAUNCHES THE NEW GENERATION OF LITHIUM ION BATTERY TECHNOLOGY SuperPolymer® 2.0

SuperPolymer® 2.0 SYSTEM, A QUANTUM ADVANCE IN ELECTROVAYA'S PROPRIETARY BATTERY TECHNOLOGY

Toronto, Ontario – April, 17th 2013: Electrovaya, the leading designer and manufacturer of lithium ion battery systems, launches its new generation of lithium ion battery technology SuperPolymer®2.0.

The Lithium Ion SuperPolymer® 2.0 battery technology is a new generation of lithium ion batteries. It represents the integration of our automotive and grid knowledge, our customers' feedback, recent safety enhancements in the aerospace sector and our overall vision of the future design of advanced batteries. This technology meets the demands of a wide range of applications including electric vehicles, marine, telecom, grid, residential storage and more.

The Company has focused on enhancing its technology by adding more safety features on all levels of the battery system. Key improvements in the battery system include:

-Safety improvements: fire resistance, reduced flammability, anti-propagation
-Wider operating temperature range at both hot and cold extremes
-More efficient thermal management system in a smaller space
-Other improvements along key performance metrics

The module-level and system-level improvements are a result of intensive development at Electrovaya as well as the addition of intellectual property acquired from Tata Motors through the August 2012 acquisition of Miljobil.

During this technology transition period, there was a reduced output resulting in lower revenues and deferred sales in the last few quarters. We expect our Q2 FY 2013 revenue to be approximately $350,000 - $400,000. With the present launch of the SuperPolymer® 2.0 battery system, Q3 FY 2013 revenues are expected to ramp up. Electrovaya has a large and growing sales pipeline in the Electric Vehicle, Energy Storage, Marine Transportation and Mobile Power markets.

The Super Polymer® 2.0 will be produced using Electrovaya's green manufacturing process, which avoids using a toxic chemical called N-Methyl Pyrrolidone (NMP), unlike most lithium ion battery manufacturers. NMP is known to have a negative effect on human health and many countries have set occupational exposure limits. Electrovaya enjoys certain benefits from this production process as it believes it has operational cost savings of up to 50% compared to others and in addition, users of the lithium ion battery systems can gain a social benefit from the use of eco-friendly battery systems.

About Electrovaya Inc.

Electrovaya Inc. (TSX:EFL) designs, develops and manufactures proprietary Lithium Ion SuperPolymer® batteries, battery systems, and battery-related products for the clean electric transportation, Utility Scale Energy Storage and smart grid power, consumer and healthcare markets. The Company's mission is to accelerate clean transportation as a commercial reality with its advanced power system for all classes of zero-emission electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. The Company's other mission is to deliver Utility Scale Energy Storage Systems for the highest efficiency in electricity storage, whether the electricity is generated from intermittent wind and solar power or from other sources. Founded in 1996 and headquartered in Ontario, Canada, Electrovaya has facilities in Canada as well as in the US and Europe, and customers around the globe. To learn more about how Electrovaya is powering mobility, please explore www.electrovaya.com


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 16 Comments
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      Hey Danny king.. Internal resistance and temperature management are 2 things that have nothing to do with battery safety. I know this is your assumption, but it is not the case, nor is that implied in the original press release. The RC world has batteries that run ice cold under extreme loads with no thermal management or special pack design needed... i'm talking about pushing >900hp drag runs out of a 150 pound battery pack, then recharging it from totally dead to full in 5 minutes, repeating the process dozens of times.. These batteries have low internal resistance and don't get hot under extreme loads, but they are the most insanely dangerous batteries you could possibly buy. Maybe you could read a bit about how and why lithium batteries fail catastrophically. I've never heard of a battery failing catastrophically due to heat build up generated during discharge. It's internal shorts ( a construction issue ), overcharge, overdischarge, or puncture that is usually responsible.
      Cavaron
      • 1 Year Ago
      Less danger of fire is nice but... what about energy density, cost, cycles...?
      Actionable Mango
      • 1 Year Ago
      I suspect this photograph might be Photoshopped. I examined it very closely for about 6 hours and finally found a clue. If you look closely, about 1 inch below the end of the word "emission", you will see a small grey smudge that does not belong. Otherwise, the photo is masterfully done and would fool all but the very best of world-class photographic forensic experts.
      Aaron
      • 1 Year Ago
      Their Photoshop skills, however, still need a LOT of work. :)
        Ian Bruce 伊恩·布鲁斯
        @Aaron
        WTF is supposed to be happening in this picture? "18 foot billboard of car collapses on improperly marked rural road"? "North Korea announces freelance digital editing services"? (Add your own).
        SublimeKnight
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Aaron
        Photoshop? These aren't even good MS Paint skills.
        Spec
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Aaron
        Yeah, holy smokes. I have no clue how to use photoshop but even I could do better than that.
      • 1 Year Ago
      Batteries only go to thermal runaway when they are OVERCHARGED. This is something the battery makers, designers, OEM's, and users are not aware of. They try to get every last electron into a battery when charging, but the charge curves clearly show a chemical state change at about 80-90% of what they call full charge. Pushing mor electrons into the battery at this point causes a CHEMICAL change which produces HEAT which produces more HEAT which causes thermal runaway until the solvents used in the battery reach ignition temperature and you have a fire. Simple to prevent, just charge to a lower capacity (voltage), never trickle charge and never let a source of voltage higher than the resting cell open voltage be present (which is what caused the Boeing fires). End of story.
        GoodCheer
        • 2 Months Ago
        Thank goodness you know this mysterious mechanism that, as you say, "the battery makers, designers, OEM's, and users are not aware of". The term 'battery' as we're using it here means 'chemical battery'. Of course there's a chemical change as you charge it. That's how energy is stored. The higher the voltage, the more positively charged ions you need to push into the cathode. "never let a source of voltage higher than the resting cell open voltage be present" If you want to charge a battery, you have to apply a voltage higher than the instantaneous open voltage. If the voltage of the charging circuit is lower than the battery voltage, you will discharge the battery.
        Actionable Mango
        • 2 Months Ago
        "This is something the battery makers, designers, OEM's, and users are not aware of." So drop them an email or something. :)
      Ernie Dunbar
      • 1 Year Ago
      "appears to be looking to quell fears that plug-in vehicles may pose a higher fire risk than conventional cars and trucks." ... ... No, I'm not feeling it. I really can't grasp how anyone can feel safer around an extremely flammable and in certain conditions explosive fuel, than they would around a battery. Any battery. I mean, look at the movies. If they were to be believed at all, you would get the distinct impression that farting in the general direction of a can of gasoline would cause an explosion, and that every car collision results in fiery death all around.
        SublimeKnight
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Ernie Dunbar
        I know what you mean. There are something like 30 reported car fires an hour in the US. If just one Tesla or LEAF caught fire (even if gasoline from another car was involved) its all we would hear about for months.
        Actionable Mango
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Ernie Dunbar
        How can you guys not grasp it? It's fear of the unknown. Fear of change. Fear of what's new versus what's old and tested. Of course people will have that fear. Humans are not rational creatures. If your grandparents drove ICE cars that never caught fire, and your parents drove ICE cars that never caught fire, all your friends and their families drive ICE cars that never caught fire, and you've personally driven ICE cars for 20 years that have never caught fire, it is not completely unreasonable to think you might have that fear, especially if the mass media highlights Volt, Fisker, and 787 fires. People gas up every week and it is such a regular and mundane task that it doesn't really dawn on them just how dangerous the fuel is.
          Dave D
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Actionable Mango
          Oh, so there's an excuse for them being whiney morons. Cool.
          brotherkenny4
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Actionable Mango
          The excuse is that they are stupid and brainwashed. What excuse do we have for the press outlets that continue the harangue of fear? Is there no one rational in the NEWS industry?
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