Hagerty Insurance seems to think vintage SUVs are going to be the next big trend in car collecting. The agency has already seen prices begin to tick upward at auction, with the number of classic SUVs insured by the company growing some 65 percent since 2008. That's about twice the pace of the overall market. All told, Toyota Land Cruisers have seen the largest jump with a swell of 202 percent, though 1970s and 1980s Jeep models are up by a more than respectable 93 percent as well. Likewise, Ford Bronco and International Scout SUVs are up by 86 and 85 percent, respectively.

Hagerty attributes the increase with the overall rise in the popularity of the SUV in general. As modern machines become more in vogue, so do their predecessors by extension. While these old bruisers haven't spent much time in the lime light at classic car auctions, Hagerty says recent events in Scottsdale featured 11 vintage Toyota Land Cruiser models, one of which sold for $88,000. That's quite a price for a 1981 FJ-40. You can read the full press release below.
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VINTAGE SUV'S QUICKLY BECOMING HOT COMMODITY AMONG COLLECTORS

Hagerty Observes Significant Shift in Allure of Vintage Sport Utility Vehicles

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (April 11, 2013) – Once considered out of place at prominent classic vehicle auctions, vintage SUVs are rapidly gaining in popularity among collectors. During a series of collector car auctions in Scottsdale earlier this year, 11 vintage Toyota Land Cruisers sold, with the best example – a 1981 Mustard Yellow FJ-40 – selling for $88,000.

The recent public sales are not an outlier according to Hagerty Insurance, host to the largest database of classic cars in the world – this has been a growing trend for the past five years. Hagerty reports the niche segment of vintage SUVs has grown 65 during the same period.

While vintage Toyota Land Cruisers (202), Ford Broncos (86) from the 1960s and '70s.

"With so many young collectors opting for modern SUVs as their daily drivers, we're seeing a shift in perception of what makes a vehicle cool," says McKeel Hagerty, President and CEO of Hagerty, the world's leading provider of classic car insurance. "Broncos, Land Rovers and other similar vehicles from the '60s and '70s were, for the most part, once seen as utilitarian. But vintage SUVs are becoming more and more collectible, and it appears that trend will continue. This is a great time to get into this segment of the collector car market."

In addition to growth in Hagerty's database, sales analysis of more than 15 major auction houses, recently conducted by the Hagerty Institute, offers further evidence of a budding trend of increased SUV sales and values. Over the last five years, the number of vintage SUV's offered at auction is up 150 percent, and the value of these vehicles has risen 31 percent.

Based in Traverse City, Michigan, Hagerty is the world's leading insurance provider for classic vehicles and host to the largest network of classic car owners. Hagerty offers insurance for classic cars, trucks, motorcycles and motorcycle safety equipment, tractors, automotive tools and spare parts, and even "automobilia" (any historic or collectible item linked with motor vehicles). Hagerty also offers overseas shipping/touring insurance coverage, commercial coverage and club liability coverage. For more information, call (800) 922-4050 or visit www.hagerty.com.

Hagerty also provides online Valuation Tools and publishes Hagerty Price Guide, which are the premier price and value guides for post-war collectible automobiles. For more information please visit www.hagerty.com/valuationtools.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 60 Comments
      William
      • 1 Year Ago
      I always liked the International Scout.
      Chris Barbieri
      • 1 Year Ago
      This comes as no surprise to me. A family member of mine has a 72' K5 Blazer, and let me tell you it attracts onlookers of all walks. Most people don't really know what it is, but they still stop in their tracks, and ask questions. Every time I ride in it, I find myself wondering if the Big 3 will ever bring out retro SUVs the same way they did retro muscle cars. Can you imagine how awesome a new Bronco, with a removable top and doors reminiscent of the ones from the 60s and 70s would be? I'd be all for it just so long as it is built to be a legitimate off-road vehicle like the Wrangler. It's time to get back to the basics with SUVs. It's time to bring them back to what they were before car companies watered them down and fattened them up for the masses. Before they were jacked up family haulers, they were more geared for work and recreation. Maybe it's time people learn to live a little, and come to embrace these types of vehicles again?
        Paco
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Chris Barbieri
        We need solid front axles and manual transfercases back as well.
        WLM86
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Chris Barbieri
        YES YES YES YES YES. What you said!
      Brian D
      • 1 Year Ago
      The problem with a classic suv is most have been altered in the aftermarket. It's hard to find an original that hasn't been modified to death.
      riserburn99andre
      • 1 Year Ago
      The market is ready for it. I've seen the interest go up big from a few friends looking for late 60s Blazers and 3 door Suburbans. Once the offroaders toy they seem to be getting more interest mainly because the alternatives are really overpriced cars. A good early model Bronco is easy to restore and has cache in the collectors market as much as the Mustangs and just as desirable. I personally love wagons and would defer to the trifive 2 door models but even those have gotten outrageous, even for the 150 trim. BTW the grandaddy of SUVs is really the Suburban. It was one of the first vehicles to be put on a truck chassis and is the oldest continuous nameplates in the US for those that don't know
      phurst
      • 1 Year Ago
      85% increase for Scouts huh? So I guess mine is now worth tens of dollars more than it was before :) I kid, but I freaking LOVE my Scout, regardless of what it's worth.
      vtmilitia
      • 1 Year Ago
      I've got a '54 Willys CJ3B that I drive and take to shows. The best part is watching folks come up and start reminiscing about the one they had or learned to drive on. Parents of little kids always tell them "don't touch the cars". Well even though I've done a frame off restoration and have won a few awards I'll ask the kids if they want to sit in it. It makes their day and their parents too.
      Richard
      • 1 Year Ago
      Early Suburbans and Dodge Power Wagons are already big.
        BG
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Richard
        They were supposed to be big. Many were sold to linemen, ranchers, or workmen who really needed something like this for their trade - not to go to Cosco on Saturday.
      Dan
      • 1 Year Ago
      Do they think unrestored Mustangs will be worth anything at sometime in the future?
        Sanchez
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dan
        What era and do you mean restoration candidates or unrestored originals?
      riserburn99andre
      • 1 Year Ago
      The biggest problem with the obscure brands would be getting hold of small stuff. Another reason why people collect certain vehicles is the availability of parts and trim pieces for them. Hence a Fairlane will be forgotten for a Mustang or a Satellite converted to a Roadrunner. The Scout is real nice but acquiring parts will be a real pain atm. If you really want to get a classic you should really study them and start building up places that have parts. SEMA has a wealth of aftermarket business that will help
      Mudotaku
      • 1 Year Ago
      I am probably going to buy a wagoneer. I know that FJ100 ad 120 are already quite expensive for beimg a late 80s early 90s car
        riserburn99andre
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Mudotaku
        The cool thing about the Wagoneer is the shell never changed throughout the cycle. You can go back to the original look from an 80s model with almost no trouble
      akitadog
      • 1 Year Ago
      Fools and their money...
        BG
        • 1 Year Ago
        @akitadog
        Hmmm, a choice: A back to basics old-school SUV that requires some degree of skill to drive, or some glitzy, electronic-filled crossover for $50k.
        Chris Barbieri
        • 1 Year Ago
        @akitadog
        Yeah, that's what I say about folks who buy all of those $45k Ford Expeditions that look sort of like trucks but are really just jacked up grocery-getters.
        vtmilitia
        • 1 Year Ago
        @akitadog
        I did a full frame off on my '54 CJ,new fenders,tub,Dupont paint,engine rebuild,suspension,seats and brake system for $10,500. Now where can you buy a used 4X4 in that condition for that money?
      AngeloD
      • 1 Year Ago
      The Cherokee (XJ) would be a good investment right about now. They will be collectible in the future, just like the Scout, Wagoneer, early Bronco, etc.
        e46mike
        • 1 Year Ago
        @AngeloD
        My Dad has an extremely nice unmolested 1985 Cherokee Pioneer with a 2.1 liter Turbo Diesel and a 5 speed with all the options available in 1985 except for a sunroof. It sits in the garage all the time. I can't wait to see what that baby will be worth in a few years...
        Pj Taintz
        • 1 Year Ago
        @AngeloD
        jeeps are meant to be driven not sit in garages
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