Paint colors are a big deal for any automaker, and choosing hues for a specific brand can take as much fretting and focus as nearly any other aspect of vehicle design. For SRT, that means finding colors that cooperate with everything from the high-performance Grand Cherokee SRT8 SUV and the Chrysler 300 SRT8 sports sedan, to the wilder Charger SRT8, Challenger SRT8 and Viper. That range requires more than a little breadth, and Jim Parker, Head of Exterior Color at Chrysler, recently took the time to sit down for a little video to talk about what goes on in the SRT Color Kitchen.

What start out as computer-generated images move to paint samples from a supplier, which then get sprayed on more complex shapes. From there, SRT may spray a whole car to see how the color looks in the flesh before ever giving the hue the nod for production. You can check out the video below to see how it goes for yourself.



I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      avconsumer2
      • 1 Year Ago
      I wish they would spend less time in the kitchen and more time on the road testing - my Challenger with 8k miles has more rock chips than my TrailBlazer with 100k+ miles. (not an exaggeration)
        kingrat001
        • 1 Year Ago
        @avconsumer2
        My '10 Challenger with 30K is doing ok with the chipping, but for some reason a friend's '12 is chipping up big time. It almost seems like the paint is as soft on his year old car as it was on my 2003 Ram. That paint had like zero flaws in it, but was so soft that my fingernail could pretty much "key" it! As far as the color choices go, it seems like a whole lot of overthinking on SRT's and Chrysler's part, especially considering the lack of color choices recently. I don't really understand why they have limited them so much, but if it's not resolved, it might affect my choice of what to buy in the future. Color isn't rocket science, it's totally subjective. Some people like brown cars, for example!
      Number23
      • 1 Year Ago
      Orange is the new red.
      Mike Lin
      • 1 Year Ago
      The "Poor Onscreen Performance" drinking game: take a shot every time Jim Parker uses the word "actually" or reminds you of why American car manufacturers continue to no longer be relevant.* *Not responsible for alcohol induced comas.
        fuzzyfish6
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Mike Lin
        Really? What car manufacturers are relevant? Please share.
      zbaumel
      • 1 Year Ago
      I would hope they "spray a whole car to see how it looks before production". . . Yea, Bob, about that brown paint we picked out, yea we should have actually painted a car first, looks like crap.
      desinerd1
      • 1 Year Ago
      so they did all this research and picked white, black, silver, red....? what a load of crap!
      k_m94
      • 1 Year Ago
      What I would like to know is how the Stryker Red Pearl paint costs $14000 on top of the already premium model GTS Viper. Even if it's going at a massive markup, it's still got to be some fantastic paint that can command so much money.
        Greg
        • 1 Year Ago
        @k_m94
        That's nothing compared to the $14,500 Land Rover charges for some of the special paint color options on the Range Rover Autobiography.