After taking last week to review the record category for World's Fastest Production Car, Guinness World Records has reconfirmed that the holder of this hotly contested superlative remains the Bugatti Veyron Super Sport.

The Veyron Super Sport set the official record back in 2010 with a Guinness-verified speed of 267.8 miles per hour, but other interested parties have recently contested that record's validity because the Veyron used that day had its speed limiter removed. With the speed limiter in place, the Veyron Super Sport tops out at 258 mph.

Guinness rules state that a record-setting production car must be unchanged from what is available to customers. While some, particularly Hennessey Performance, have claimed that removing the Veyron's speed limiter violated that rule, Guinness has settled the matter by stating that "a change to the speed limiter does not alter the fundamental design of the car or its engine."

This is a nice win for Bugatti on top of the news last week that the Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse also set a record for the fastest open-top production car with a speed of 254.04 mph. That record, however, as far as we know, has not been verified by Guinness World Records.

For its part, Hennessey, whose claim against the validity of Bugatti's record didn't work this time, could potentially break the record outright if given enough road for its own Venom GT to run. The 1,244-horsepower Venom hit 265.7 mph earlier this year before running out of room on a two-mile runway, though those runs were not officially verified by Guinness. Nevertheless, there still remain questions about whether or not the Venom GT counts as a production car by Guinness standards. The world record authority defines "production" as building at least 50 examples and only 29 Venoms are supposed to be built, though Guinness does permit itself to grant exceptions.
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Guinness World Records statement: Fastest production car

Following a thorough review conducted with a number of external experts, Guinness World Records is pleased to announce the confirmation of Bugatti's record of Fastest production car achieved by the Veyron 16.4 Super Sport.

The focus of the review was with respect to what may constitute a modification to a car's standard specification.

Having evaluated all the necessary information, Guinness World Records is now satisfied that a change to the speed limiter does not alter the fundamental design of the car or its engine.


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  • 40 Comments
      jebibudala
      • 1 Year Ago
      I bet I can scrounge up 50 Datsun 240z's and throw a twin turbo built 2,000hp Viper motor in them with super long gears. I too can claim the worlds top speed record and name my "production" car, "The El Kris"
      Torben Busk
      • 1 Year Ago
      With all due respect to the criticism of the Veyron, let's get this straight. They did NOT strap on a bigger turbo or installed NOS or anything else 'going-faster-gear'. They simply removed the restriction, that they had put upon them selves. Instead of modifying a Lotus, and promising to do to another 28 cars, they should make the 50 cars needed before going for glory.
        46wireboy
        • 3 Months Ago
        @Torben Busk

        The criticism should go to Guinness who ignores their own requirements when it suits them. Their regs clearly state that the car is only eligible in trim PURCHASEBLE by the public. Here's a thought about the record; maybe it shouldn't be allowed because of the location. Except for the  Maclaren F1 no one else I'm aware of gets to use the 12m Volkswagen track with a 5.4 mile straight with high speed banked corners at each end. It must be nice to start your attempt at 150+ mph and then have to slow to 150+ mph after. No 0 to 257mph to 0 in 2 miles for the Veyron. Just thought I'd sharpen the image a bit.

      usci1
      • 1 Year Ago
      Take it to the salt flats to see what it can realy do. Put a parachute pack on the back in case....
      Bernard
      • 1 Year Ago
      I don't really see the Venom as a production vehicle, it seems more like a kit car. I'd definitely trust the Veyron more at those speeds of course, someone better than me would have to be driving.
      sp33dklz
      • 1 Year Ago
      I\'m not a huge fan of either car, but the better engineered car obviously won. Besides, all Hennessey did was put a gigantic motor inside someone elses chassis, make some modifications, and call it his own. Hennessey is a coachbuilder, not a production car manufacturer. Big fail IMO.
        hp
        • 1 Year Ago
        @sp33dklz
        Exactly, Hennessey is along the lines of the guy who put the lambo engine in the fiat 500 in the other article. Maybe less trustworthy but same thing.
          Josh
          • 1 Year Ago
          @hp
          Loads of misinformation abound here... Hennessey is more than just a 'guy who put this in that' - they, like Saleen or Roush or even Callaway are manufacturers of note, practically OEM. This includes custom designed/patented processes/parts + full 'factory' warranties.. More than a guy win Italy/Germany with too much time and too much access to the parts bin. The move is political guys, like everything in life. You mean to tell me one of the biggest AGs in the world would let this happen? C'mon...
          clquake
          • 1 Year Ago
          @hp
          I'm sorry, Hennessey is not in the same league as Roush or Saleen. At least Saleen fully engineered the S7, although he did "borrow" a Ford engine for it, and Roush is a proven winner. Hennessey is fairly successful at what he does, but no one's tapping him to build race engines or to design a chassis.
        DyanRucar
        • 1 Year Ago
        @sp33dklz
        Most righteously concurred. In other news, there's more to automotives than claiming top speed records. To each their own? Of course.
        Army Casualty
        • 1 Year Ago
        @sp33dklz
        I agree about Hennessey in terms of it's category, and so I think they just can't have that production car record, period. However, car to car, the Hennessey wins in the speed race. That can't be denied. So I think it is less about engineering and simply, categories.
          zero
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Army Casualty
          Winning a speed race without reliability is easy and has done many time like Power Racing Ford GT showed. The biggest challenge is to achieve high speed while adhering to government standard and having a reliability of ordinary car.
      hockeyman747
      • 1 Year Ago
      justice
        Taint
        • 1 Year Ago
        @hockeyman747
        my thoughts too. Better luck next time hennessy.
          speedracerx808
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Taint
          They just need to use the same track that Bugatti did. They hit almost the same speed in half the distance, and an extra mile or so. And I'm sure they could break 268.
      Kent G
      • 1 Year Ago
      This whole debacle makes me wish the Veyron was stripped down to nothing but wheels and an engine (like the Venom) and ran to its inevitable 300mph+ top speed just to prove to Hennessey you don't mess with the best.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      johnb
      • 1 Year Ago
      Ahem, Miss Veyron, your hood gaps are showing.
      11fiveoh
      • 1 Year Ago
      The veyron is an overengineered masterpiece, the venom is little more than an overpriced hopped up lotus. At the price point i cant imagine it being anyones top choice, unless they already own the others.
      The Wasp
      • 1 Year Ago
      As much as I respect the Veyron, it's kind of old news in this conversation. The time will come (probably pretty soon) when it's top speed is eclipsed -- either by the Venom or some other car. I get the impression Bugatti would like to move on to their next project but I wouldn't be surprised at all to see another special edition Veyron to reclaim the speed throne (after the Veyron is officially surpassed).
      Ford Tuff
      • 1 Year Ago
      I saw one of this Bugattis in Berlin (inside a display box) and I am not a big fan of the aesthetics of the car. I can understand if someone else likes it though. Interesting article. Would it be worth it to own a car like this in the area where I live which is filled with hungry cops and speed traps all over? Let's not mention the people who'd be all over it if I park it on the street? I truly enjoy my simple life. :) Caw caw!
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