If there's one thing Italian supercars seemingly love more than moving quickly, it's being on fire. That even applies to iconic machinery like the Lamborghini Miura SV, one of our personal favorite exotics of all time. One such Lamborghini owner just witness their machine go all flambé during a photo shoot in London. Details are scarce at the moment, but it looks as if something went awry in the engine bay.

You can watch the disaster in the video below, but just make sure your stomach is well prepared for the nauseating sight. Nothing's worse than watching $700,000-worth of gorgeous collector car go up in smoke.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 458 Comments
      rmt_1
      • 1 Year Ago
      If one doesn't care about losing points at an automotive concours and wants to actually drive their classic sports car, this video makes a strong argument for getting a professionally installed fire suppression system. Historic accuracy doesn't mean much when you start to smell smoke and begin to see a black plume emitting from the engine compartment. Such a system may not have prevented this Miura from being damaged, but it certainly could have bought enough time for this car to be left at least salvageable, if not just slightly singed in a best case situation. Heck, for a $700,000 car, the few grand a top of the line fire suppression system would cost could easily be offset by potential savings from one's auto insurance premiums over just a few years.
        k_m94
        • 1 Year Ago
        @rmt_1
        I think a concours that takes off a few points for a modern fire suppresant would take off more than a few points for the entire car being a write-off.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      ack154
      • 1 Year Ago
      I wonder how many of the random people standing around watching had any idea at all what they were actually looking at. How many of them knew what a machine that really was?
      my06srt10
      • 1 Year Ago
      Based on many of your comments its obvious most of you aren't car collectors and probably couldn't afford a car like this even if you were. This was a beautiful and rare classic collector car that is going extinct. There is a reason this person can afford a $700k collector car, he has a great job and probably has his own company. Don't hate on or be jealous of someone that has more money than you. And for any of the comments below talking about fire technology, keep in mind, this car is from somewhere around 1970. Technologies were very different then. You don't normally see a 1969 Camaro with antilock brakes or air bags. I can feel this persons pain, regardless of the cost or insurance coverage. If my car burned I would be devastated even though the insurance would cover it. When talking collector cars I don't believe there are 2 cars that are the same. Each is unique.
        edthez
        • 1 Year Ago
        @my06srt10
        You're right. That's why I now have in my stable a 1984 VW campmobile and a 1999 Heritage Softail Classic. People just cannot appreciate the horrendous values of these vehicles. I'd bet they would fetch up to $1,500 at auction.
      S
      • 1 Year Ago
      $700,000 car and no fire extinguisher??
      xcatchmyshadowx
      • 1 Year Ago
      i just died a little inside
      nelcovp
      • 1 Year Ago
      A little Bondo and an air freshener will fix things right up.
      Gary
      • 1 Year Ago
      This would realy make me sick if that was mine. Even if it had insurance the car is gone forever.R.I.P.
      dukeisduke
      • 1 Year Ago
      With all those carbs and fuel lines, there are plenty of leak points.
        idcsr1
        • 1 Year Ago
        @dukeisduke
        Only if you're dumb enought to drive without replacing hoses and carb gaskets and hose clamps. These maintenance items are readily available at really low cost.
      e7c
      • 1 Year Ago
      Sahib Wieben, ACORBRA163 - The FD arrived within the first minute of this video. The Captain could see that there was no exposure problem. If he did he would have ordered another Fire Engine to respond to beyond the traffic jam. As it was the cars were moved within 2 minutes. There is nothing wrong with that at all. If you are not aware, it happens all the time. People will freeze as if their feet are nailed to the ground in an emergency. Next up in your comment, "why the one hose?" I would have attacked with a 1 3/4" hose but they used a rubber one inch hose. This is the Captain's discretion. There really isn't a big problem here either. The rubber hose can take more abuse in it's use and is easier to clean. I still like the 1 3/4" because it puts out more water. But the Captain might have considered that more water wasn't easily available in that location and picked the 1" hose accordingly. Next up, "they were unprepared." They looked fine to me. Their priorities are taught this way, RECEO Rescue, Exposure, Containment, Extinguishment, Overhaul. There was no rescue, or exposure. They contained the fire to the car. That is SOP standard operational procedures; It is taught worldwide. Once a fire moves from it's origin into another containment the firefighters job is to move it back to the source. Now in a car fire, the fire moved from the engine to the rear and the passenger compartment. Plus it looked to me it had already traveled to the front compartment. This car is a total loss before water hits it! As for foam or CO2 or dry chem; only would be used in very special cases. Foam takes a longer time to set up and is known to cost too much to be used on every car fire. Some fire engines have foam ready to go with the pull of a lever. But they are not always a favorite because the material can be caustic to the workings and paint of the fire engine. The other two materials have similar downsides too. The only odd thing I say was the two firefighters not working together enough. The hose was being sprayed on the left while the 2nd FF was attempting to open the right. When that happened fire was licking up his leg. The Captain saw this and moved him back. Again, nothing too unusual. If you take any lesson from what I wrote consider this; gather all the facts before you take action. Especially an opinion of what you know little.
        parainthenoid
        • 1 Year Ago
        @e7c
        I love it when you are allowed to speak sense.
        Fred
        • 1 Year Ago
        @e7c
        Ok, e7c, I'm impressed with what you seem to know. Why didn't they give it a two-three second burst of Halon and put the fire out immediately? Do fire trucks not carry Halon? It's readily available on the market (look in any airplane supply catalog). I have half a dozen (15" high) sitting around my house. Big commercial operations (United Air Lines Training Facility in Denver is one) protect their expensive operations with it. I once saw a demo of a coach (airplane) seat (for three) that had a half-gallon of gasoline dumped on it and then was lighted. They let it burn for maybe ten seconds then gave it a one second burst of Halon from a hand held extinguisher (like I have at home). The fire was immediately extinguished. I was impressed (and bought my six extinguishers).
          e7c
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Fred
          Precious few Fire Engines carry halon; it is expensive. I ran most of my calls in a busy city. We had 6 or 7 calls a day. A car fire would happen almost everyday. Most cities don't have the money for that kind of cost for refills. But you are right it would be a one-shot deal for the fire. Halon is usually reserved for a computer or techie kind of items. It leaves no residue. Car fire? No one really cares about residue. I have used the halon many times in my younger career. They were a blast to use because they worked so well. But I live in California and refills for halon have been outlawed for years. The law said that you could possess the halon but refills were restricted. It might be even more restrictive now. Keep your extinguisher filled and pressurized they are great to use.
      dumbneasy
      • 1 Year Ago
      For $700,000 one would think an automatic fire extinguishing system, or freon system would have been a standard accessory.
      cimarelli427
      • 1 Year Ago
      700,000 and didnt have the common sense to equip a 10.00 extinguisher.
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