2012 Mini John Cooper Works Coupe
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  • 2012 Mini John Cooper Works Coupe
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Surprise, surprise. According to Edmunds, Mini may be looking to reduce the number of vehicles in its range, which has recently expanded to include a total of seven offerings (not to mention the copious varieties of configurations found within each line). When Mini relaunched in the early 2000s, it did so with one model, the Cooper Hardtop, and has since added the Convertible, Clubman, Countryman, Coupe, Roadster and Paceman. It looks like those ambitions of expanding the range to include up to 10 models may have been a bit optimistic.

"When we start to replace models, I think you will see that we won't replace every model exactly," Jim McDowell, Vice President of Mini USA, told Edmunds in an interview. The brand's core models right now are the Hardtop and Countryman, and of the roughly 66,200 vehicles that Mini sold in the United States last year, these two vehicles accounted for some 75 percent of total sales.

McDowell declined to mention any specific models that may not be replaced in the lineup's next generation, though our best guess is that ultra-niche vehicles like the Coupe (pictured) or Clubman. As for replacing some of the current models with new products, the only clear gap we can see in the brand's lineup is a smaller car like the Rocketman concept, though we've been told several times that a mini-Mini isn't going to happen. Be sure to let us know what Mini models you'd like to see kept or axed in Comments below.


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  • 88 Comments
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Dvanos
      • 2 Years Ago
      Too many models, all the same thing. Just offer the original cooper hatch and convertible along with the countryman and the clubman. That's all you need right there.
        Phontsolo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dvanos
        No. The coupe only has two seats. The hatch has only four seats. They both have different rood lines. That in itself makes them both different from each other. So they are not "all the same things."
          Hello, Brian
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Phontsolo
          Given. They have different rooflines and number of seats, but what are the other differences? Short answer...there are none.
      chrismcfreely
      • 2 Years Ago
      Axe all of them, then you don\'t have to decide. ; - )
      icemilkcoffee
      • 2 Years Ago
      My god -that coupe is UGLY. Looks like a half squashed cockroach trying to scamper away.
      SpikedLemon
      • 2 Years Ago
      I like the Clubman. It was on my list of cars I considered buying last time. Too bad it wasn't rated for towing.
        telm12345
        • 2 Years Ago
        @SpikedLemon
        I 100% agree. I like the clubman a lot. I really hope they keep it.
      Alex740
      • 2 Years Ago
      BMW is starting to see the limitations of the mini brand. They can create as many models as they want but there are only so many people interested in retro styled cars and only a handful of body styles that wear the design language successfully. I still think BMW should have bought Saab, turned it into it's midrange FWD brand which would have let mini remain small and BMW remain high end and RWD drive but instead they are going to water down both brands in order to try and cover the middle market.
        jasondonogh
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Alex740
        I agree. Purchasing Saab would have been a smart move.
          William Flesher
          • 2 Years Ago
          @jasondonogh
          BMW tried a similar strategy when it bought Rover/MG. Which they then sold to the Chinese after losing a ton of cash. They are probably reluctant to try again. And as incredible as SAAB's were, they were far too quirky to be a good fit with BMW, Just as they were with GM.
      adb12
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hmm... Seems a bit odd that this info--coming from Mini's US chief--is completely opposite what the home office in Germany was saying a few months back about adding MORE entries to the portfolio. Perhaps just the US showroom will shrink...
      Renaurd
      • 2 Years Ago
      They should have stopped before they got to the one in the picture.........
      Jerry
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ya think?!
      Iconoclast
      • 2 Years Ago
      Some random thoughts that come to mind: I don't love the Mini styling nor do I hate it, but the styling alone is not enough for me to justify a purchase. But the reality of the situation is that the styling probably IS the primary reason that most Mini buyers take the plunge. The performance envelope is a distant consideration for them at best. Hell, my coworker recently traded his hand-me-down Mini Cooper in for a larger car, stating that it wasn't practical for him to own a sports car as his only car. In other words, it appears that the performance is probably good enough for those who are first motivated by the style of the car. If they would just leverage the AWD setup from their SUV IMO a regular hardtop, they may actually have something I'd be interested in. Lastly, I would have never in a million years guessed that they would be as successful as they have been with all of the many variants. If someone would have come to me after the first gen new Mini came to market and said that Mini planned on making an SUV, convertible, station wagon thing, etc., all sharing the same platform, I would have told them that the whole thing would fail miserably. As such, I'm not terribly surprised to learn that they are having trouble moving certain models but I'm also quite surprised that they are selling as many as they are.
      Really
      • 2 Years Ago
      No! Really? Duh!! Has nothing but trouble with my R56 Cooper S and BMW's tech had no clue. I ended up fixing it myself. Sad, sad, sad!
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