Liberty Electric Cars
says it will unveil a vehicle next year that will be able to go as many as 1,000 miles on a single charge. We just don't know if that vehicle will be a converted Land Rover, though.

The UK-based company's CEO Ian Hobday points to 2014 as the production-model debut of the Liberty, Motor Trades Insight reports. The publication lists a gaggle of European cities that would be reachable without a recharge from London (Paris, Brussels, Milan) with such a vehicle. Liberty isn't saying what the model will be or how much it'll cost, but did say it plans to double its workforce from the current 40 employees by year-end.

California-based Green Automotive Co. bought out Liberty Electric last year for about $17 million in Green Automotive stock. Liberty said five years ago that it would invest about $45 million to convert Land Rovers, Range Rovers and other larger SUVs into electric vehicles, and would sell the models for between $150,000 and $200,000 a pop. And in 2010, Liberty debuted its converted Range Rover (the E-Range), which had a 200-mile single-charge range and a $250,000 price tag.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 35 Comments
      • 1 Year Ago
      I think Liberty are 'taking liberties' with their wording - I think they mean it will be a plug-in hybrid, an EREV like the Volt, and 1000miles is the total mileage.
      SublimeKnight
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'm "working on" a cold fusion reactor for 2014
      goodoldgorr
      • 1 Year Ago
      Is it possible to write article in present instead of in future. This article should have been: jeep liberty electric ready with 1000 km range on a single charge for 50 000$ sold actually in california and new york and london.
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      It is trivial to stuff a huge amount of batteries into a vehicle to achieve a long range. It is also completely pointless, inefficient, and counter-productive. Just drive a hybrid if you are going to drive that far. The right tool for the right job.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        As the energy density of batteries continues to grow, it will become less and less "pointless" to have a large battery.
        PeterScott
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        I wouldn't say it is trivial either. That 300KWh of batteries could weigh in around 4000lbs. That is just for the battery, What kind of vehicle can support that added mass?
          PeterScott
          • 1 Year Ago
          @PeterScott
          @EV Your pack is still heavier than what I used in my calculation. 4000lbs is a reasonable, if not generous assumption unless they are using esoteric batteries, or fudging a lot on range. Like 1000 miles at 25 mph ( I think a Tesla will do 450 miles at 25mph).
          PeterScott
          • 1 Year Ago
          @PeterScott
          Show me a complete Automotive Pack that weighs 10lbs/KWh? We aren't talking naked cells. A 16KWh Volt pack weighs 400lbs. That is 25lbs/KWh. I think I was quite generous at 13lbs/KWh. In reality to go 1000 miles in a car as efficient as a Tesla would take 320 KWhs, and a car with that much battery wouldn't be as efficient as the Tesla. It would more likely need 350 KWh further pushing up the pack mass. It seems like they would need to do something like the Aluminum Fuel cell "battery".
          JakeY
          • 1 Year Ago
          @PeterScott
          Trivial with non-rechargeable "batteries" (like the aluminum air recently mentioned). Not so trivial with a rechargeable battery. The Model S pack density is 143Wh/kg, so 2097 kg or 4623 lbs for a 300kWh pack.
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 1 Year Ago
          @PeterScott
          PeterScott and 2wm, My pack is approx 500 lbs probably a bit less. It is 33 kwh. Kokam thin and flat pouch cells. The batteries are now 4 years old. This includes the outer and inter battery boxes. It has battery warmers. Nothing elaborate but the batteries stay warm. They don't need cooling. Spec, I do not agree, 100 miles range is to small. 200 is the sweet spot for range. Both Yari have 145 mile range one third hwy and two thirds city. 125 miles at 55 mph. At 300 miles all excuses are mute.
      Giza Plateau
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's doable but it wont be a dumb Land Rover. I wonder how many of those dumb quarter million dollar conversions they have sold. Marcopolo might have bought one because he's just the right kind of clueless about it but who else in the world.. Can't be many. I hope they haven't spent 45m$ on it. That would be quite facepalm. As Spec correctly points out there is little reason to make such a model for sale but as a demonstrator it could be interesting to see a 1600km range EV. It is technically doable but at the very limit of current battery tech. Given their extreme incompetence in selecting a Rover for their first car I sort of doubt they will do it though. You have to keenly respect aerodynamics and weight optimization to have a chance. Unless someone is lending them some prototype batteries.
        Marcopolo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        DF/ Giza Plateau For a guy who's never owned an EV, let alone built one, you sure mouth off about stuff you know nothing about !
        brotherkenny4
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        Sulfur cathodes and silicon anodes should give lithium ion about four times the energy density as the current technology. Some are working on these. Although, probably not ready by 2014. Add in some decent aerodynamics and light weight materials, and away you go.
      BipDBo
      • 1 Year Ago
      Using existing Li-ion battery tech, a 1,000 mile goal is idiotic. Trying it with something with the aerodynamics of a shoebox is even more so.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @BipDBo
        Exactly. And the 1000 miles is probably at 25 mph or so. And who wants to drive 1000 miles straight except that crazy astronaut lady that wore diapers to drive fast in order to get revenge on her rival? Anything with a range of more than 400 miles is probably dangerous to other drivers because the driver is getting cramps, highway hypnosis, tired, cranky, etc.
        ElectricAvenue
        • 1 Year Ago
        @BipDBo
        Shoeboxes are actually more aerodynamic.
      Cavaron
      • 1 Year Ago
      Sounds to good to be true... but give me a battery with "1000miles@60mph range for 10000$ or less and 200 recharge cycles or more" and we have a hell of a deal!
        Rob Mahrt
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Cavaron
        Lol more range than a current ICE, for half the price of a current ICE, less cost of fuel, and less moving parts to break... Yea I am pretty sure every human on earth that owns a car would be in on that.
      DaveMart
      • 1 Year Ago
      Indeed. That is why I said: 'Not a lot of use'.
      Reggie
      • 1 Year Ago
      The kind of folk that buy Range Rovers are absolutely loaded money price is like buying a bag of peanuts, so l can only see this doing selling very well. Can't see our Queen worrying to much to much about $200,000 for the next Land Rover her corgis will travel in to church on a Sunday, when she is worth trillions.
        Marcopolo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Reggie
        @ Reggie It doesn't matter what name you use, you always get everything wrong, don't you ? Queen Elizabeth 11 is not "worth trillions' ! You are confusing the term 'Crown' with the Queens personal property. Crown land and assets are owned by the (people) and administered by the governments of those Commonwealth countries which retain Queen Elizabeth as head of state. The Queen has absolutely no personal "ownership" over these assets. Nor can the Queen sell the crown jewels, or any other of the Royal Assets. The Queens private wealth at her disposal, as opposed to her role as sovereign, makes her moderately wealthy, but with so many claims on her income, Queen Elizabeth is no where near as wealthy as many of her subjects, or even other Monarchs. At 86 years of age, Queen Elizabeth, still manages over 430 official engagements each year, and often works 12 hour days ! Maybe if you worked so hard, on researching your posts you might get your facts right.
      GasMan
      • 1 Year Ago
      If you consider the size and weight of the best batteries, the fact that you have to carry them everywhere, the heat they can generate, and that they weigh the same empty or full, there is a crossover around 400 miles that make is extremely impractical to construct a usable vehicle with substantially more range. You could do it but it would be a silly pointless exercise since it would be so impractical and expensive that you would never sell one.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @GasMan
        By the way.... A good battery, with a lot of headroom in the discharge spec, does not generate much in the way of heat. If you could double the energy density of a current battery, a Nissan Leaf could have a 150 mile range and the battery would be the same size and weight. A Tesla Model S could have a 500 mile range. Is it impossible to do so? no, not really.. lithium battery energy density doubled since the early 2000's. It can happen again.
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @2 wheeled menace
          It would be better to make a vehicle with 100 mile range and costs much less. A 500 mile range is a waste of money . . . you'd be carrying around thousands of dollars and hundreds of pounds of batteries that you would only use 2% of the time. You can do that for the high-end luxury price-does-not-matter market but for the mainstream market it is just silly. Rent a hybrid for that 500 mile trip. I think once people realize that they don't really need more than 100 miles of range except for rare occasions when they can just rent a gas car, that is when the EV market will break through to the next level. Every Leaf, Mitsubishi-i, Focus Electric, RAV4 EV, Think City, Coda, Spark EV, Honda Fit EV, and other short-range EV owner out there proves that it works.
          Marcopolo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @2 wheeled menace
          @ paulwesterberg and Spec, " It would be better to make a vehicle that travels 500 miles per charge and costs much less ". Why ? Because you say so? Must everyone be the same ? Must everyone conform to your preconceived ideas of what constitutes a 'real' EV ? The more EV models available in every market segment to replace ICE vehicles, that people actually want, is better than trying to force people to conform to your lifestyle needs. .
          paulwesterberg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @2 wheeled menace
          It would be better to make a vehicle that travels 500 miles per charge and costs much less.
      DaveMart
      • 1 Year Ago
      They might be using something like a non-rechargeable aluminium battery. Not a lot of use unless recharging can be figured out, but should provide the energy they specify.
        PeterScott
        • 1 Year Ago
        @DaveMart
        But recycling the Aluminum after use is about 15% efficient. Worse than a below average ICE.
      Spiffster
      • 1 Year Ago
      I thought Marco had some kind of Electric Land Rover already... thought he had mentioned something about it in a past article. I imagine the guy has got to be loaded to own such an item.
        Marcopolo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spiffster
        @ Spiffster I own an LERR exactly like the one featured. As for being 'loaded' to own such a vehicle, that's not really true, it depends on what you want to spend money on ! When I bought my LERR, it was the only highway capable EV available in the UK. It was a statement I wanted to make. (It was also a reward to myself for years of endeavour to pay-off a great deal of inherited tax demands from incompetent UK governments !).
          Spiffster
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Marcopolo
          Well that makes sense... we dont see many Land Rovers around here in Denver. People, myself included, tend to make a big deal about them... let alone an electric one.
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