Vital Stats

Engine:
1.6L Turbodiesel I4
Power:
103 HP / 236 LB-FT
Transmission:
6-Speed Manual
0-60 Time:
11.0 Secs (9.0 Secs w/1.4L T)
Top Speed:
112 MPH (130 MPH w/1.4L T)
Drivetrain:
Front-Wheel Drive
Curb Weight:
3,010 LBS (est.)
Seating:
2+3
Cargo:
14.1 / 46.3 CU-FT
MPG:
32 City / 52 HWY (26/32 w/1.4L T)
Base Price:
$23,500 (est. for US 1.4L T)
Practicality From The Italian Ministry of Cute



As seen in the correct Italian/European light, Fiat is rightly dubbed a small car kingdom. This is not the marque's whole story, though, and it's certainly not a way Fiat appreciates being pigeonholed. But even the brand itself sort of has to admit that, in the end, without clever and right-priced smaller cars in its lineup, it might not even exist today.

Between the early 1980s and the dawn of the 21st century, however, the Fiat brand seemingly did everything it could to wreck itself and its core compact-car reputation by producing a series of certifiably unamazing cars that mostly looked drab and behaved below average. Just go have a gander at the Ritmo, the Duna, the 1992-98 Cinquecento, 2004-07 Seicento/600, and the most recent European mega-flop (though actually a pretty good car), the Stilo, discontinued in 2008. Thankfully, almost right out of the gates since the mid-aughts, however, that has no longer been the case.

Jammed in this self-inflicted Catch-22 of small-car dependence, Fiat finally started capitalizing on the millstone hanging around its neck and turned it into a positive with the introduction of the new 500 back in 2007. The 500 and its wildly popular Abarth interpretations have allowed Fiat to at last create good premium-subcompact profits because these cars have become personalized trend and fashion statements worldwide.

Now I've driven this cheeky 2014 Fiat 500L mini-MPV, which should arrive in the US by the end of June. It's the next chapter in the Fiat brand's rise from the ashes and re-entry in America. The latter has been perhaps a much slower rise than desired due to the Great Recession and a European car market that continues to collapse in on itself in pretty scary fashion, but there is now light at the end of the Fiat tunnel. After a whole week of normal day-to-day with child and friends and stuff and many miles traveled, I was genuinely convinced by the 500L after not really knowing at all what to expect.
2014 Fiat 500L side view2014 Fiat 500L front view2014 Fiat 500L rear view

It's built at the production facility that once churned out the god-awful Yugo subcompact.

People who study this industry and like to suss out things at which they can point a skeptical finger will jump all over the fact that the 500L for North America (and the whole world) is being built at a factory site in Kragujevac, Serbia. This is a site where once was located the prehistoric production facility that churned out the God-awful Yugo subcompact. We can already see commenters reaching for their keyboards who will insinuate that everything Fiat builds there will be no better than a Yugo. If you are one who feels the necessity to incorrectly make that claim just because you can, hold on for a sec, will ya?

Fiat took over the entire industrial site in Kragujevac that was then occupied by builder Zastava, which produced the humiliating little Yugo hellbox until 2008. Right away, the Italians chucked everything out and built up what is now arguably the most advanced production facility in the entire Fiat-Chrysler Group empire at a cost approaching $1.5 billion. What I noticed on my very Euro-chic top-trim 500L Lounge with a torquey 1.6-liter MultiJet turbodiesel engine was that, at this attractive price range, it is eminently useful, well-built, clever and to my eyes, just the right amount of adorable. Here's hoping its North American marketing and advertising can be as well-targeted as that for the 500 Abarth or for the post-J.Lo-debacle standard 500.

2014 Fiat 500L headlight2014 Fiat 500L wheel2014 Fiat 500L rear window2014 Fiat 500L taillight

Many cues on the 500L do carry over from the sweetly cute look of the 500.

Alright, I am not blinded by my head being in the clouds, nor am I drunk on Chianti: the 500L is a very... interesting design, let us say. A-hem. When the word "adorable" comes out of my mouth in reference to the 500L, it is the happier word I choose when looking at my daughter after she has dressed herself and done her own hair for the first time ever. The 500L's frumpy exterior grew on me during the time I was with it. I will say that I prefer this design to the Mini Countryman, and that many cues on the 500L do carry over from the sweetly cute look of the 500 citycar.

Those open to such littler sets of wheels as the 500L – folks such as myself, I suppose – should flat-out dig this well-packaged hauler. Just the sitting in it brings a grin to one's face. Granted, the higher seating perch I had in daily Italian city traffic will feel less "up there" on American streets with sheetmetal mountains all around you, but should still be sufficiently elevated under most circumstances. I do hope, too, that the seat bottoms are lengthened a bit for North American bodies since they felt too short for adequate thigh support. Overall exterior size-wise, we're talking Mini Countryman and Kia Soul territory here.

2014 Fiat 500L interior2014 Fiat 500L front seats2014 Fiat 500L rear seats2014 Fiat 500L rear cargo area

The suspension setup is meant more for country cruising versus carving curves.

You can look at the 103-horsepower rating from this 1.6-liter turbodiesel MultiJet four-cylinder engine and the 500L's curb weight of 3,000-plus pounds and chuckle, but the spring in the step at lower revs and lower gears around the city or suburbs is really good, thanks of course to the 236 pound feet of torque generated way down low in the rev range. Getting to 60 miles per hour from a stop in 11.0 seconds or less, having a maximum speed of 112 miles per hour, and returning upwards of 52 miles per US gallon, last I checked, were more than sufficient numbers to get by in one's day-to-day. This is especially true in an urban context while hauling stuff and humans around in tighter streets. Plus, all of the Italians were staring at us in a really good way and frequently asking questions about the 500L – always a good sign.

Aside from the outstanding seating orientation and obvious benefits to outward visibility, the default suspension calibration of the 500L surprised me immediately because I was expecting to get pretty banged up and hear dampers bottoming out on Italy's bad city streets. None of this happened and the feel was terrific for everyday driving on all surfaces, even with my fully optioned tester dressed in the 17-inch "Bianco Diamantato" wheelset with Goodyear Eagle F1 all-season treads – 225/45 R17 91V all around. Granted, once the road turns sporting and you want to push the 500L the way you might do your Abarth, you soon see that the 500L setup – as it shares its architecture with the Euro-only Fiat Panda micro crossover – is meant more for country cruising versus carving curves and lap times. There is some wallow in the chassis, but it's soft and merciful as it nicely absorbs any bumps encountered.

2014 Fiat 500L rear 3/4 view

We can expect a quicker mini-MPV experience than what I experienced here in Italy.

The version of the 1.4-liter Multiair turbocharged four-cylinder gas-fueled engine that will be found in the North American 500L is similar in design to the 1.4-liter four in the Dodge Dart. It has a tune that strays more toward that of the European Abarth Punto, though, as it reaches 158 hp and 184 lb-ft of torque for an estimated acceleration to 60 mph in 9.0 seconds or less (compared to 7.7 seconds in that Abarth Punto weighing 300 lbs less than the 500L). So we can expect a quicker mini-MPV experience than what I experienced here in Italy, but lower-end pounce in the city will be less satisfying than with the 1.6-liter diesel engine I tested.

Another joyous detail in my loaded 500L was that they stopped short of loading it with the six-speed optional "dual dry clutch" transmission, instead leaving in the standard six-speed manual. When it comes to smaller diesel engines, a manual is the best pairing option and this is a very good gearbox. The Fiat DDCT is alright, but in this particular configuration with the diesel engine as its mate, I would avoid it. With the 1.4T gas setup for the US, however, the DDCT should make a fairly good companion. But that manual with its big easy-to-palm shift knob is ultimately the way to go in the 500L if you care about driving smoothness and enjoyment.

Autoblog Short Cuts: 2014 Fiat 500L

I could think of few finer fair-weather tour mobiles for hitting the national parks, for instance.

Inside the 500L, life is good with a flexible cargo and passenger area, an enormous panoramic opening glass roof (optional) and a good suite of onboard systems to help. All passengers should feel they have plenty of space, and cargo room can range from the basic 14.1 cubic feet on up to 46.3 cu-ft. The front passenger seat can also fold flat for those long IKEA loads.

With that optional glass roof – barring pigeons or seagulls that eat masses of fiber perching on branches above your parking spot – I could think of few finer fair-weather touring mobiles for hitting the national parks, for instance. In addition, attaching the touchscreen operated onboard media to the optional Beats sound system from our own Dr. Dre makes for a thumping party in this glass house. An odd, maybe erring on ultra-kitsch, touch with the fabric seats in my tester is the embossed scripted English messaging in the seatbacks front and rear that reads: "More color can speak to the heart in a thousand different ways."

Uplifting fabric messaging aside, the 2014 Fiat 500L should successfully inch the Italian brand into larger and more accommodating market segments. And it's a frumpy-cute li'l thang. C'mon.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 180 Comments
      Jdelisi
      • 1 Year Ago
      Fiat Uno, are you insane? Fiat sold six million of them!
        lostboyz
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jdelisi
        and Chrysler sold 10million pt cruisers, doesn't make it a good car
          Shiftright
          • 1 Year Ago
          @lostboyz
          No they didn't. They made 1.35 million Cruisers and Fiat made 8,800,000 Unos, making it the eighth most produced automobile platform in history, after the Volkswagen Beetle and Ford Model T. And the PT Cruiser never won European Car of the Year or any awards for that matter.
          GreenN_Gold
          • 1 Year Ago
          @lostboyz
          PT Cruiser = 2001 MotorTrend car of the year, but now this is getting off topic.
          Colin
          • 1 Year Ago
          @lostboyz
          But the Uno really was a brilliant litle car.
        Matthew Davis
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jdelisi
        Regarding the Uno - they sold a lot and the car is awful. Truly a terrible little unit. In its day, fine and dandy, because Fiat was still trying to keep other manufacturers out of Italy and had a lot of corrupt execs and politicians doing all they could to make it so. I would hazard to guess that nearly all of those millions of Unos were sold in Italy, perhaps in Brazil as well. And Fiat lost trillions on it. Bad car that sold a lot to people who required a cheap metal appliance to abuse only.
          Tuga
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          Nope, the Uno sold well over Europe. In fact, it\'s still selling well in brasil, where it is now called the Mille. No way Fiat lost money on that car... THEY\'RE STILL MAKING IT TODAY.
          Matthew Davis
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          Nope. The Uno is a money-losing thing and forever has been so. Talk to Fiat execs like I do. It is what you call a loss leader to get feet in the door.
      Mr. Sled
      • 1 Year Ago
      The Brittish racing green-esque color isn't doing this thing any favors in separating its look from a Mini. That being said, I think a red or white one with some Italian flair would be appropriate. It's Italian and needs a bit more sauce, IMHO. That being said, I like what they've done here. It's great for Fiat's 500 brand.
      cpmanx
      • 1 Year Ago
      I love the cheerful simplicity of this design overall, but have two major reservations. One is power: a vehicle like this will frequently be used fully loaded, and I'd worry about having just 158hp on tap for a 3,000-pound vehicle + 1,000 pounds of passengers and cargo. The other is packaging. The rear seats do not fold flat, but create a highly stepped two-level load floor. I can tell you from experience, that is a major inconvenience when loading large suitcases and boxy cargo. Cargo space with the rear seat up, on the other hand, looks surprisingly spacious. Using the Jetta SportWagen and Dodge Dart as reference points, I would guess that the 1.6L turbodiesel would get mid-40s mpg on the highway, and the gasoline version we will get will post highway numbers in the mid-30s. For urban dwellers with young families (I am one of them), this kind of vehicle makes a lot of sense. I'll be curious to check it out.
        Robert Bleumer
        • 1 Year Ago
        @cpmanx
        You can alter the height of the cargo floor, so there's no step there. It'll give you a flat loading floor.
      Shiftright
      • 1 Year Ago
      Matt, Love the article but have to say you're a bit misinformed about Fiat's history. The Giugiaro-designed Uno was not only European Car of the Year but a HUGE hit worldwide, consistently at the top of its class in sales and now considered a Modern classic. They made 8,800,000 Unos, making it the eighth most produced automobile platform in history, after the Volkswagen Beetle and Ford Model T. The Ritmo also sold by the bucket loads and was anything but bland. One of the most interesting C Class hatches made, and it spawned some memorable Abarth variants. automotobounce.com/pics/ff/60/Fiat-ritmo-130-tc_a2990.jpg The Stilo was a bit bland, but actually very well built and engineered. It drove/ handled well, but ironically it didn't sell because many buyers and the press in general thought it felt too German, which apparently Fiat buyers didn't want.
        Matthew Davis
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Shiftright
        I actually know all of this history. The point is that they are all universally looked back on as dumpy little tin cans mostly for poor folks in struggling economies. Fiat never made any money on such vehicles and the company can singularly thank the overly generous Italian government for throwing trillions of lire their way and writing off the debt every year. The Uno is a thoroughly awful car and Fiat would love to forget it. The Car of the Year Award in Europe also went to the Bravo/Brava, but that proved ridiculous as well. Cheap sheetmetal for the millions assembled badly is exactly the reputation Fiat has struggled hard and successfully to change. Fiat actually is accountable now on two continents and needs to make money. These cars sold in bucket loads perhaps in Italy and Brazil. Nowhere else were the buckets happening.
          Gianfranco
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          Dear Matt, I can see the point about FIAT producing cars without making big money from them, but saying that those vehicles were crap, expecially when speaking about the Fiat Uno, is a total misconception. The Uno belonged to the B segment of the time (nowadays cars in that segment are much bigger) and it was designed for Europe. It shared the same name as the Brasilian Uno but they were completely different cars that looked alike. In the same time, the B segment was populated by many other cars more or less the same size but almost no one compared to the Fiat Uno in terms of usability and also overall quality was good. Engines were happy revving and fuel consumption was low. In the 80s, cars competing in the same segment were the Ciroen AX, the Ford Fiesta, the Opel Corsa, the Seat Ibiza, the Rover Metro, the Renault 5, the Volkswagen Polo and the Peugeot 205. The Peugeot 205 was the real contender in this segment, and it was a better car from many points of view, more refined and better riding. The Fiat Uno and the Peugeot 205 have been for years the best selling imports in Germany, not properly a third world country. The Uno has been the best selling car in Europe for many years. Fiat will never forget the Uno as it set many milestones in Fiat's industrial history. If you were here in the 80s (and maybe you were) you could see those B segment cars all over Europe. How many of them can you still see around? It was packed with Renault 5s, where have they all gone? What about the cute 205? When was it the last time you saw one? From time to time I can still see some MK1 Uno on the road, even abroad, in Europe... It was a great small car and millions of Europeans enjoyed it.
          Marin
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          I agree with a lot of things said here, and not that i don't appreciate your effort to research, but I can't agree with you saying Fiat Uno is awful, and Fiat would like to forget it. If they would like to forget it, why did they keep it in production from all the way 1983 to 1995? (And even after that, it was built in Poland and sold for 6 more years) Fiat uno was a brilliant little package for its day (that's why so many people bought it), it may look awful by today's standards, but a Ford Model T and VW Beetle don't look so great now either, and I doubt Ford and VW would like to forget about them. I agree on the Ritmo and Stilo though, partially on the Bravo/Brava (they were more modern than the competition when they came out (that's why they were crowned car of the year), but competition had replacements for their own models that came out only a year or two after them, which were superior) and while on the subject of reliability, my '96 Brava has been great.
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          "Harsh medicine rarely goes down well and I accept that." Only if it's delivered by a professional in medicine. You certainly aren't a professional in automotive knowledge. You're entitled to your opinion, but it's baseless and you had absolutely no hands-on experience of life in Europe or ownership of these cars. Even when confronted by Europeans who have much more intricate knowledge of Fiat and its products than you do, you persist in your comments. Sheer arrogance, and nothing more. You need to be struck off from even posting articles.
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          "The Uno and its siblings are exactly the generation of cars which nearly killed Fiat mainly because the company had no profits and horrible reliability from all of them. The Uno won awards because it cost nearly nothing to buy and was entirely acceptable for people disinterested in cars." You're from a different planet, mate. The Uno was a massive seller for Fiat and kept the company afloat. It outsold the 205, despite the fact the 205 had a more composed ride. Only when Ford's mk3 Fiesta came along in 1989 that the Uno's sales mantle fell. The only unreliable Uno was the Turbo IE, the remainder were all fine, especially the 903 and 999cc units. The 903 and 1116 engines had been built for years, used in the 127 and 128, and well-proven. It was a big seller across Europe, and in the UK probably Fiat's best-selling car ever.
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          "Sheer folly, no. And your comments are not based on what actually happened in the lives of those models. It'd be nice if production numbers and ECotY awards were all that mattered. Sadly..." Your comments ARE folly. You have absolutely no idea as to Fiat's products or its fortunes at that point in time. And allow me to let you in on some resounding common knowledge - Fiat's fortunes, which flagged by the mid 1990's as a direct result of the Punto failed to repeat the enormity of the Uno's success, began their revival after it began producing the JTD unit in 1997, which coincided with the launch of the Alfa 156. By 1999, it was back in the black, but suffered losses again between 2002 and 2005.
          Matthew Davis
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          Yes it does. The Uno and its siblings are exactly the generation of cars which nearly killed Fiat mainly because the company had no profits and horrible reliability from all of them. The Uno won awards because it cost nearly nothing to buy and was entirely acceptable for people disinterested in cars. Again, they sold by millions in Italy and perhaps Brazil. Everywhere else, Fiats didn't even figure on top ten sales lists.
          Marin
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          @Matthew, think what you like, but since you've never actually owned one of those cars, i cannot take your opinion seriously...
          lasertekk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          Your opinion doesn't match the facts/history.
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          "The point is that they are all universally looked back on as dumpy little tin cans mostly for poor folks in struggling economies" That's absolute rubbish. The Uno was the best B-segment car in its class for many years, an enormous seller and it was only the BE14 Fiesta mk3 in 1989 which eclipsed it in sales. It sold in huge volumes throughout Europe. The Uno wasn't an awful car - back in the day I had the 1116cc Uno. It didn't rust, it ran extremely well and posed no problem doing 90mph in fifth on the M5 with the car full of camping gear. Interior fot and finish weren't brilliant, but as long as you didn't opt for the 1.3 or the Turbo, the engines were brilliant. The 903 and 999cc FIRE units being the best of all.
          Matthew Davis
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          Marin - you are right. Lived here 13 years but never owned one of these awful cars, thank goodness. Driven every one of them a lot, though, and they are, well, terrible by any civil measure of what car buyers should get for their money. Disbelieve me if you like, I can take it. Free world. Ish.
          Matthew Davis
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          Sheer folly, no. And your comments are not based on what actually happened in the lives of those models. It'd be nice if production numbers and ECotY awards were all that mattered. Sadly...
          Matthew Davis
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          You take it as you take it, and I know as I know. Harsh medicine rarely goes down well and I accept that.
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          Matthew Davis, it helps if you know what you're talking about. Your comments are sheer folly.
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matthew Davis
          "Marin - you are right. Lived here 13 years but never owned one of these awful cars, thank goodness." Hmmm ... 'wise men speak because they have something to say. Fools speak because they have to say something". So said Plato. Clearly he was dealing with the likes of Davis.
      Robert Bleumer
      • 1 Year Ago
      I've got a Stilo, and it's not a bad car at al. Actually, today's the first time in 40.000 kilometers it's gone to the workshop, it's now at 150.000 kilometers, and the only thing so far are 1 headlamp adjuster (30 bucks) and 2 lightbulbs. Actually, the new Jeep Cherokee and the Dart are built on an evolved version of the Stilo platform.
        Matthew Davis
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Robert Bleumer
        Stilo fans - Have to admit that the Stilo was not a bad car. It was the last big launch of product that fell victim to the still then in place totally hopeless Fiat Automobiles administrative dysfunction. They couldn't get a product launch right if it killed them. And then came Marchionne...and it's now going way way right-er than ever before. Poor ol' Stilo.
      foxtrot685
      • 1 Year Ago
      I see the spiritual successor to the PT Cruiser in this thing, and thats not bad at all. The PT Cruiser was very functional with its large interior and its fold flat front passenger seat (which the 500L has). It was just ugly and not very well built. It looks like they fixed those shortcomings, by far; it should continue to grow the Fiat brand in the US.
        GasMan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @foxtrot685
        The perfect successor to the PT Cruiser. It is also ugly and not very well built.
          Shiftright
          • 1 Year Ago
          @GasMan
          Clueless hater gonna hate cluelessly
          Colin
          • 1 Year Ago
          @GasMan
          The one I looked at seemed very solid.
          lasertekk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @GasMan
          If the build quality is anything similar to the 500, then they really 'want' that problem. The 500 has had no major gripes or recalls to date.
      cpmanx
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's a polarizing design, as is clear from the comments here, but I like it a lot--quirks and all, at least there is some real sense of style and playfulness at work here. I'm also a fan of this kind of boxy, space-efficient packaging...perhaps because I live in a city with tight parking and have a couple young kids. You have to judge a vehicle like this against its intended market. It's not supposed to be a sports coupe, or a mini-SUV. It's a people mover, and it looks like a pretty good one at that. Personally I'm more intrigued by the upcoming 500XL, which Fiat now says will be sold in the U.S. It gets an 8-inch stretch, essentially all of that behind the rear doors, to allow a third row of seating. That will make the proportions more van-like and less 500-like, but the result will be one *very* useful package. Not clear what engine the US version will use; I hope it's something bigger than the 1.4L turbo.
        Matthew Davis
        • 1 Year Ago
        @cpmanx
        cpmanx - They're calling the XL internally the "5+2" and I'll drive that in July it seems. It means the third row, of course, but I'm hoping they do something really clever with that third row. Needs to be easily converted to a big flat floor storage space. Cross fingers.
      Anthracity
      • 1 Year Ago
      In my opinion, it was a mistake to include this new car in the 500 nomenclature. They were obviously hoping to make use of the 500's reputation to help sales of this 500L. But with this car being in a completely different class, and also not looking anything like the cute little runabout that is the 500, I think Fiat wasted some of the 500's magic on a rather mediocre-looking, utilitarian car, and in doing so, stained the 500 name.
      desinerd1
      • 1 Year Ago
      I wouldn't sit inside this tiny death trap.
        Lachmund
        • 1 Year Ago
        @desinerd1
        give us a break
        Shiftright
        • 1 Year Ago
        @desinerd1
        I think you should get in a mid 80's caprice and slam it against a wall and see how safe you are
        Colin
        • 1 Year Ago
        @desinerd1
        It has done excellently in the crash tests.
        Tuga
        • 1 Year Ago
        @desinerd1
        Would you consider sitting in an actual deathtrap? Please?
        lasertekk
        • 1 Year Ago
        @desinerd1
        Anyone who uses the term deathtrap in an automotive conversation is not a car guy.
      Groagun
      • 1 Year Ago
      If you like this car, good for you, go buy one. It sure isn't pretty though and I've seen it and sat in it in person. For all of the Chrysler/Fiat employees and hired web/blog commentators, try not to be so obvious when you do your dirty work. Chrysler/Fiat will sell as many as they need or project and be done with it. It will be interesting to track the comments here after the 6 pm eastern dinner hour after people are home from work and real AB readers and commentators are on.
        Shiftright
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Groagun
        Wow, are you Grumpy Cat? You need to get laid or something...
        lasertekk
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Groagun
        I am real, and I'm on PST, commenting from (looks over shoulder) work.
        Groagun
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Groagun
        Oh BTW, if your going to go on the offensive over Fiat, then why not the 500X? That was good looking and I think would sell well in NA.
        Matthew Davis
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Groagun
        Groagun - what "dirty work" are all these fake people doing? Don't get your point(s) that you seem so sure you're making here.
        Groagun
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Groagun
        HAHAHA, you people make me laugh. This is one ugly little turd of a car. I know, you know and so does the rest of the world. If it's your thing though, have at it, as I said earlier I'm not here to tell you not to like or not to buy something. I suspect you wont buy it but I do not expect you to be honest about that. I'm not sure what you are trying to defend here, Chrysler/Fiat as a company, simply the car itself, the need for smaller transportation in large urban centers, or some other agenda I can't figure out. I suspect Chrysler is paying people or marketing agencies to post nothing but positive reviews and comments on this vehicle. The number of and fever in which the defense is going on is rather suspect on this particular vehicle. I've attended a few press events where this car appears and 90+% of comments have been negative in the looks department. Mechanically I think most are accepting of the quality in the technology but come on, "lipstick on a pig" kind of stuff. And by all means vote me down even greater if you want, I do not care. You are the ones defending this terrible little car. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, so again have at it all you like.
          Matthew Davis
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Groagun
          Is that a real laugh there? Or sort of sarcastic and evil? You are mysterious and alluring.
        tump
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Groagun
        **** you.
      Jasonn
      • 1 Year Ago
      I just cant understand why anyone would want this car... or any fiat/mini/smart or ultra small/bubbly car. I'm in the car industry and it just doesn't compute in my brain. I see people buy them and drive them and love them but the whole time I'm thinking, "What drug did you take to makes that appealing to you!" lol
        cpmanx
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jasonn
        The 500L is nothing like a Smart. It seats 5 with generous cargo space in a compact, easy-to-park package. The style is fresh and cheerful. I am leery of making too many judgements based on nothing more than an AB review and a few photos, but I see a lot of appeal to this. The question you ask is kind of like asking "why would anyone buy a Porsche Cayman when it seats only two and gets lousy gas mileage?" That is--it is the wrong question entirely.
        mikeybyte1
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jasonn
        Then obviously it is not for you. Why do you think there are pick up trucks? Or off road Jeeps? Or convertibles? Or minivans? There are markets and buyers for all shapes and sizes and features and functions. Small cars are great if you live in the city or have to commute in and are always challenged with parking. Plus something like the 500L will keep a small footprint while giving you the option to carry friends and some cargo when needed.
        foxtrot685
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jasonn
        Because not everyone has the same needs and wants out of their vehicle. If everyone had the same needs and wants out of a car, there would only be one car manufacturer with one model and one trim level. Think about that.
          tnsubie
          • 1 Year Ago
          @foxtrot685
          And it would come in any color you want, as long as its black.
        GasMan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jasonn
        Dude, are you stuck in the 70's? Bigger is better, everyone really wants a larger car... That is the type of boneheaded thinking that almost brought down the US auto industry and still saddles us with giant pickup trucks, gargantuan SUVs, and hemi engines. It is frightening that someone in the revitalized auto industry can still think like that. I hope you are near retirement. This vehicle is not a bad idea, it is a really bad implementation.
        Jasonn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jasonn
        lol I knew i'd get a response. Yes, I sell cars, I sell new Subarus and Toyotas as well as used cars. But I've owned a lot of different cars and driven thousands of cars and there are so many vehicles that do everything these dinky cars do, but do it much better.
      FuelToTheFire
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'm sorry, but anyone with a Y chromosome who buys this Barbie car needs to trade in his testicles. Immediately.
        flychinook
        • 1 Year Ago
        @FuelToTheFire
        You're right, everybody should just buy a rough-and-tumble (looking) SUV instead. Just like all the other soccer moms.
        Quen47
        • 1 Year Ago
        @FuelToTheFire
        Is your masculinity threatened by this car?
        Patrick
        • 1 Year Ago
        @FuelToTheFire
        Is getting married an equivalent?
        mary.keana
        • 1 Year Ago
        @FuelToTheFire
        fueltothefire, Are you so unsure of your "manhood" that you need a RAM heavy duty dually cummings turbo diesel crew cab truck just to go shopping for your hair products?
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