The Chinese government is enacting escalating fleetwide fuel-economy standards that may be fairly reasonable for 2015 but become far less realistic at the end of the decade.

China's National Development and Reform Commission are among government entities that say the country's new passenger cars would be required to reach a fleetwide 34 miles per gallon by 2015, marking the first-ever overall fuel-economy mandate for China, Reuters reports.

And while recent fleetwide numbers aren't available, Reuters quotes John Zeng, Asia Pacific director of consultancy LMC Automotive, as saying that China cars boosted fuel economy by about five percent in 2009 to a little more than 30 miles per gallon, implying that cars would have to cut fuel consumption by a realistic two percent a year through the next three years.

That's especially doable if, as Pike Research predicted last year, China plug-in vehicle sales jump by 60 percent a year during the next few years, ultimately reaching 152,000 units in 2017. Still, China's leaders are mandating fleetwide fuel economy of about 47 miles per gallon by the end of the decade, which will take a heck of a lot more than 152,000 plug-in vehicles to reach.


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  • 26 Comments
      Actionable Mango
      • 1 Year Ago
      On what cycle? For all I know a car that gets 50mpg in their testing cycle gets 20mpg in real life. For example, Japan and Europe are notoriously optimistic.
        chanonissan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Actionable Mango
        the Japan and Europe test are not optimistic, but manufacture has found how to get around them, and also EPA like the latest fasco Hyundai (40 mpg) and EPA and the ford c-max VS real world.
      • 1 Year Ago
      I think this is great news from China. Whether it will actually be implemented or not is a topic for another day, but I think it is a step in the right direction!
      Giza Plateau
      • 1 Year Ago
      try mandating aerodynamics and weight and rolling resistance tires. that should show some results
      brotherkenny4
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's good that there be mandates everywhere. The average person only views the up front costs and does not consider total cost of ownership. The idea that there are ways to save overall by spending more initially is confusing to them. This is of course why they remain poor and indebted for their entire life, because they never make a considered decision. They typically instead act emotionally, and are also more susceptible to advertisements and group think. Many would never consider doing something different than the majority of people.
        throwback
        • 1 Year Ago
        @brotherkenny4
        "The idea that there are ways to save overall by spending more initially is confusing to them. " or it could be they simply can't afford the upfront cost. I don't know where you get your information about the "average" person what they consider or don't consider, but your statements are amusing.
      throwback
      • 1 Year Ago
      I wonder why they didn't take the European route and mandate CO2 limits?
        Jesse Gurr
        • 1 Year Ago
        @throwback
        CO2 isn't the problem IMO. It is the particulate pollution you should be watching for. They tax CO2 in Europe, which is why diesels are popular since they have lower emissions than gasoline cars. However, they give off more particulate pollution than gas cars and that is what is causing all the health problems. http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2013/jan/27/diesel-engine-fumes-worse-petrol Didn't autoblog just report on health issues from pollution? http://green.autoblog.com/2013/03/26/your-cars-exhaust-can-cause-not-just-trigger-kids-asthma/
      • 1 Year Ago
      My 2007 Peugeot 307sw with 1.6l TDI can easily reach 47 mpg right now, so I really don't see what's the problem. Oh, and it does seat seven.
        The Wasp
        • 1 Year Ago
        There is no way you can fit 7 real people in that thing. Also, I wonder if the Chinese regulation has been translated to US mpg or European mpg. Many European cars have highly inflated ratings.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          If you weren't confusing anything you would not have asked: ' I wonder if the Chinese regulation has been translated to US mpg or European mpg' as the conversions are clearly to US gallons and are correct.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          There are 3.8 litres in a US gallon, and 4.5 in an Imperial gallon. The conversions are to US gallons and are correct. You are confusing conversions with the different cycle that Europe uses to the US EPA cycle. The European cycle is indeed more lenient. I don't know what fuel cycle China uses.
          The Wasp
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          @DaveMart -- I'm not confusing anything. I know the unit of measurement and the strenuousness of the test both cause European mileage ratings to look unbelievably high as compared to EPA ratings.
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      Ah, so they're finally getting tired of living in a haze of hydrocarbons...
        Giza Plateau
        • 1 Year Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        47mpg is hardly getting tired. a total ban with a 3 year horizon would be a real change. And china could easily do it. of course some nuclear power plants and some improvements to the coal power plants would be needed too.
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Year Ago
      Articles like these are hopefully naive. Just because a spokesman for the PRC 'government' makes an announcement to the western media, doesn't mean anything will actually occur ! It may indicate anything from a genuine desire by the Beijing government to try to accomplish something along these lines, to a simple propaganda announcement, for western consumption, with no substance whatsoever. In between, the layers of PRC vested interests, CCP and various officials, regional interests, and manufacturers will co-operate (or not) with Beijings directives with the usual widely varying results. In the meantime the PRC is building coal fired power stations as an unprecedented rate, to sustain a rate of growth its banking sector can't accomodate. The two giant PRC oil companies are using their recently acquired western extraction technology to partner Russian oil companies like Lukoil, Gazprom and Rozneft, to extract oil from the Arctic sea, with the usual disregard shown by the corporations for environmental concerns. If this was Exxon or Shell etc, environmentalists would be ranting about 'evil' oil companies ! But, from the silence, it appears only Western Oil companies are 'evil' !
      chanonissan
      • 1 Year Ago
      not only in north america but now china, the new passenger cars have to reach at least 35 mpg by 2015. Guess Nissan's boss foresee this coming and was right all manufacture need some form of electrification , to help those gasoline V6 and V8 reach that magic 35 mpg, may it be stop start, mild hybrid, full hybrid, plug in hybrid, or pure electric. diesel is an other option. http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/03/18/renault-nissan-electric-cars-idUSL6N0C4FBU20130318
        Jesse Gurr
        • 1 Year Ago
        @chanonissan
        "diesel is an other option." No it isn't. Not if you want to reduce particulates in the air. It is mostly diesel in Europe and they are having problems with people not being able to breath. http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/mar/19/uk-air-pollution-health-crisis
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Jesse Gurr
          get what you are saying, but they are in reference to reach higher mileage by 2015.
        chanonissan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @chanonissan
        oh also down sizing and supercharging engines in the mix, either by supercharger or turbo.
      Oolly
      • 1 Year Ago
      You go China!! I've been meeting this standard for more than 4 years now, with a car that cost much less than the average transaction price in the US.
        The Wasp
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Oolly
        Praytell, what is your magic machine?
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          I'm guessing a late-90's Geo Metro.
          BF4ALTF
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          Actually most Prii meet this requirement, even on a combined mileage number. And, with starting prices at just over $20k, that's well below the $30,274 average (as of last fall).
      The Wasp
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's pretty hard to imagine this going into effect -- I am also pretty curious about the current average miles per gallon. I wonder what test they use -- if it's similar to EPA or the European cycle.
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