US public and private entities are adding publicly accessible electric-vehicle charging stations at a clip of about 180 units a month, which would put the country's total at about 7,400 by year end, according to US Department of Energy figures.

For the six weeks from January 17 to February 28, the most recent date tracked, about 250 stations came online, bringing the US total to 5,615. California remained the state with the largest number of stations, by far, increasing its count by 81 units during those six weeks for a total of 1,182. San Diego had 82 stations open, San Francisco had 76 and Los Angeles had 68 stations.

The state with the second highest number of plug-in stations is Texas. The Lone Start State had 424 units open at the end of last month, including 69 in Austin and 45 in both Dallas and Houston. Third-place Florida was home to 351 publicly accessible charging stations.

As for retailers, Walgreens hosted 365 stations, Kohl's had 55 and Whole Foods boasted 39 stations open to the public.


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  • 19 Comments
      Carguy
      • 1 Year Ago
      Adding "fueling stations" is a much easier proposition for EV's than for gasoline. Every shopping center in an area like Los Angeles could add adding two EV chargers at a cost of under $3000. If I tried to open a gas station with two pumps in a city like LA it would cost $500K-$3M.
      David Murray
      • 1 Year Ago
      Dallas may have a lot of stations, but over here in the Ft.Worth/Arlington area we have very few.
        Aaron
        • 1 Year Ago
        @David Murray
        Download the "CarStations" app, then look at all the charging stations across Arlington and Ft. Worth. Granted, Dallas has more, but there are a lot in Arlington, and not what I would call "very few" in Ft. Worth.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 1 Year Ago
      I saw a Tesla Model S parked on the street the other day. I felt like being nice, and thought about leaving a note directing them to the free public charger (Eaton, 30A 240v) half a block away. http://i555.photobucket.com/albums/jj456/letstakeawalk42/autos/48ed6245.jpg
        Letstakeawalk
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        I guess it's better that I didn't leave the note. I'd hate to have insulted the owner's intelligence by assuming they might appreciate knowing where a free charger is located. Better to let them find it on their own.
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          Oh I think it would have been a nice gesture. I'm just pointing out that they might have already known and they did their own nice gesture of letting someone else take it.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        He probably has no need for the charge and it was better for him to leave it open for someone that would really need the charge.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          How selfless of the Tesla driver.
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          maybe the Tesla driver just didn't want to walk another 1/2 block. Who knows? If you don't need the charge, why bother? You are only going to save a few cents.
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        The best part of owning a Model S is you don't have to charge as often.
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      Most EV owners will tell you that they almost never use public chargers. But that said, I will start using them if there are more and can be conveniently used. There is a trust issue with public chargers. You don't want to do a trip that relies on public chargers unless you are 100% certain that you will be able to use one. There was that recent story about a guy who planned his trip but then found out the charger was broken, locked up at night, or not for public use. You can't do trips that rely on public chargers if that might happen.
        Aaron
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        I don't have a trust issue with public chargers. The reason I've never used one is because I don't drive past the charge limit of my vehicle. 99% of my driving is to and from work. If I need to drive a long distance in my car, I have 8 different charging station location apps installed on my iPhone. You know, just in case.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        I use public chargers almost exclusively. Right now the BLINK system is free and is 440v. So I fill in 30 minutes on my Leaf while I read the paper or make calls. And there are three to choose from in my small town. That's a better deal than my home charger.
        Dave R
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        Yep, reliability of charging infrastructure is key, especially with regards to quick charging where typically only a single station is installed and reliability of said stations is very low. I would be very hesitant to rely on one without at least additional L2 station located very close and without additional QC stations within 15 miles or so for backup. 240V/30A L2 charging is very helpful for backup charging should a QC station fail - it's really too bad that Nissan/Mitsubishi only installed 240V/16A L2 chargers on the first iteration of EVs.
        Ryan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        Taking one-hop trips might work out, especially if you can still make it back home if the charger has a problem 9although on a really drained battery. (Drive to you have 50% left, charge, drive around that area, charge again, and make it home) If I want to go to the next big city from me, that is what I would need to do.
      • 1 Year Ago
      It was amazing to see these electric stations at our beautifully refurbished Virginia Rest Areas. After owning this car for a year, it was amazing to see the money I saved in i just one year (not to mention the $7500.00 rebate)!
      lad
      • 1 Year Ago
      When will California install stations between Sacramento and Oregon to finish their part of I-5?
        Dave R
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lad
        Most of I5 really isn't the right route to electrify for current EVs - population density is too low and distances too far unless you drive a 60-85 kWh Model S, in which case Tesla already has infrastructure there for those cars (and already needs to install more to meet demand at some locations!). A better route for most EVs (meaning LEAFs) would be HWY101 closer to the coast. Speeds are slower and there are much more interesting stops. No one is really going to QC more than a couple times a day for a couple reasons - you spend too much time charging and at least with the LEAF without active thermal management, the battery pack heats up too much which is not good for battery life. That realisticaly gets you no more than about 200 miles / day in a LEAF.
      Dave
      • 1 Year Ago
      That's almost equivalent to 4 gas stations.
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