2013 Nissan Leaf
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  • 2013 Nissan Leaf
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Nissan
is sending more juice to its electric-vehicle sales efforts following disappointing demand forits all-electric Leaf.

The company says all "zero emission vehicle planning and strategy" will now fall under Chief Operating Officer Toshiyuki Shiga's responsibility. EV division corporate vice president Hideaki Watanabe will leave Nissan to become senior vice president at supplier Calsonic Kansei Corp.

Nissan is hoping Leaf demand will surge this year now that it has started US production in Tennessee. Through February, sales were up 13 percent from a year earlier but totaled just 1,303 units. For all of 2012, Leaf sales in the US were less than half the 20,000 units Nissan had earmarked. In fact, Nissan's Francois Bancon, in a recent interview with Reuters, says Leaf demand "isn't where we thought it would be," and that the company was "in a very uncertain phase, and everyone's a bit lost." Nissan in January reduced the price of the 2013 Leaf by $6,400 to a base of $28,800.

Read Nissan's quick rundown of its management changes below.
Show full PR text
NISSAN ANNOUNCES SENIOR MANAGEMENT APPOINTMENTS

Yokohama, Japan - March 11, 2013 – Nissan Motor Co., Ltd, today announced senior management appointments, effective April 1, 2013. The changes cover the positions of Executive Committee Members, Senior Vice Presidents (SVP), Corporate Vice Presidents (CVP) and Vice Presidents (VP).

"These appointments are the second phase of changes we have made in recent months to strengthen both our global and regional management teams," said Carlos Ghosn, Nissan President and CEO

Executive Committee

Zero emission vehicle planning and strategy and global battery business unit will report to Toshiyuki Shiga, Chief Operating Officer.

Hiroto Saikawa, Executive Vice President, Purchasing and Chairman of the management committee for Asia, Oceania and Japan is appointed concurrently Chief Competitive Officer. Manufacturing, supply chain management, R&D, and total customer satisfaction will now report to Mr.Saikawa.

Nissan's Affiliated companies and Marine administration will report to Joe Peter, Chief Financial Officer.

Corporate Officers and Vice Presidents

Takao Asami is appointed SVP, planning & advanced engineering development.

Bunsei Kure is appointed SVP management committee Asia and operational committee for Affiliated companies.

Anthony Laydon is appointed CVP, global supply chain management.

Kunio Nakaguro is appointed CVP, Research Center.

Simon Sproule CVP, global marketing communications is appointed concurrently Director, marketing communications, Renault-Nissan Alliance.

Roel De Vries is appointed CVP, global marketing and brand.

Jun Seki is appointed VP Dongfeng Motor Company Limited, Nissan's joint-venture partner in China.

Jeff Kuhlman is appointed VP, global communications.

Corporate Officers leaving Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.

Minoru Shinohara SVP research, advanced, electronics, and planning & advanced engineering development division will retire.

Masaaki Nishizawa SVP Japan marketing and sales is appointed EVP human resources for JATCO

Hideaki Watanabe CVP zero emission business unit is appointed SVP electronics business unit, for Calsonic Kansei

About Nissan
Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., Japan's second-largest automotive company, is headquartered in Yokohama, Japan, and is part of the Renault-Nissan Alliance. Operating with more than 248,000 employees globally, Nissan provided customers with more than 4.9 million vehicles in 2012, generating revenue of 9.4 trillion yen ($US118.95 billion) in fiscal 2011. With a strong commitment to developing exciting and innovative products for all, Nissan delivers a comprehensive range of 64 models under the Nissan and Infiniti brands. A pioneer in zero-emission mobility, Nissan made history with the introduction of the Nissan LEAF, the first affordable, mass-market, pure-electric vehicle and winner of numerous international accolades, including the prestigious 2011-2012 Car of the Year Japan and 2011 World Car of the Year awards.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 55 Comments
      TurboFroggy
      • 1 Year Ago
      There is less than 1000 Leaf in stock at dealers nationwide, that is clearly not enough. If Nissan wants to sell more Leaf they just need to make more. They have a good price point that beats just about anything TCO wise. After the 500+ fast chargers at each dealership + more inventory sales numbers will go up big time. Dealers in the Seattle area are struggling to keep inventory up. Some have good levels, as many Leafs as any other models, but some of the biggest Leaf dealers only have 5-6 in stock because they sold the initial shipments they got. Need more inventory!
        Sasparilla Fizz
        • 1 Year Ago
        @TurboFroggy
        We'll finally get to see what actual demand is for the Leaf. Guessing we should finally be getting production to match demand in March or April as they scale Tennessee production up.
      chanonissan
      • 1 Year Ago
      I must admit I was on the TMS band wagon, reading more let me learn that having a TMS would only solve 30% of the problem, because when the vehicle is park it would not be cooling unless the system is made to run 24/7 and it would be consuming power from the battery, and further more all li-on batteries suffer heat degrading in hot climate when the vehicle is park (unless their is some fan running mean while) when the vehicle is park.
        chanonissan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @chanonissan
        must add telsa have a huge battery pack so they can operate a cooling fan 24/7, nissan pack is smaller, would the buyer accept less range? Other from that if leaf operate in temperature less than 120 degree it will be ok. Europe climate favour the leaf with little or no degrading.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @chanonissan
        A larger battery help would negate the need for thermal management. I think that is the way they need to go. This car needs a 100 mile range, so when the battery is old and saggy in 5 years, it still delivers 50-75 miles of range and is still usable as something other than just a grocery getter in the battery's old age.
        aatheus
        • 1 Year Ago
        @chanonissan
        Tesla Roadster (and probably Model S) have active TMS that runs whenever needed, whether plugged in or not. As a result they warn against leaving the car unplugged for long periods.
        Sasparilla Fizz
        • 1 Year Ago
        @chanonissan
        With other vehicles (the Volt for example) the TMS envelope the batteries sit in a thermally insulated container so that outside environmental temperatures do not penetrate to the battery (they will over a long period of time, but they are insulated very well, like a good thermos). The problem with the Leaf is that its battery is in a sealed (no ventilation) steel box on the bottom of the car that is thermally conductive to the outside environment below the vehicle (this is to shed excess heat during normal use as it drives), but in very hot environments like summer blacktop in hot places, this means that the Leaf pack just conducts that thermal heat from the hot blacktop right back into the pack and cooks it over time.
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Sasparilla Fizz
          furthermore the other EVs are new , we need a two year to see how they are doing, the TMS will help, but I say you are make assumption that heat will not affect them, when there is no report yet on their performance in hot climates, and you can not use the volt because it only consume a portion of its battery. The leaf and the MIEV have loss capacity in hot climates, that what we know so far, but they are older. The MIEV have battery cooling and it still degrade. so as I say TMS will not solve all problems.
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Sasparilla Fizz
          @ rotation what the hell are you saying? nissan have a heat pump for 2013. the use of it is more range than a electric heater, and yes it have some thing to do with battery. "If you drive a 2011-12 Nissan Leaf, you’ll know that keeping your car warm in winter can drop its range by as many as 30 miles, due to the inefficiency of the its coolant-to-air heater. Starting with the 2013 Leaf, Nissan has already promised a much more efficient heater that will better the 2011/12 Leaf’s cold-weather performance by 20 to 25 miles. So far, Nissan hasn’t said what the new heater will be, but partner company Renault has just detailed information about the ultra-efficient heating system in its Zoe Electric Car. Since Renault-Nissan’s electric car projects are so interwoven, could the Leaf be getting the same ultra-efficient heater? " http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1078614_could-2013-nissan-leaf-use-renault-zoes-heat-pump-for-cold-weather
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Sasparilla Fizz
          @Marcopolo, you do not know how battery operate do you, it gives off heat when in use, when the heat pump suck current from it it will be warm at some point. I never said it is a direct battery heater. And some people do not now how TMS work either,think it is for winter.
          Marcopolo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Sasparilla Fizz
          @ chanonissan You do understand what a 'heat pump' is don't you? It's really just a reverse-cycle air-conditioner.
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Sasparilla Fizz
          you keep mention where the pack is place, ok I get it, but i am saying the leaf operate will in moderate temperature, but not well in extreme hot, and the leaf you mention is the older one, the 2013 have a heat pump.
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Sasparilla Fizz
          this will tell you nissan does have a heat pump for 2013 http://www.treehugger.com/cars/2013-nissan-leaf-has-14-more-range-and-170lbs-lighther.html
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Sasparilla Fizz
          Nissan never confirmed the 2013 having a heat pump, just a "hybrid heater". And the 2013 having a heat pump is irrelevant, the heat pump doesn't affect the temperature of the battery pack. The heat pump is there to produce hot/cold air for the interior (cockpit).
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @chanonissan
        Well, you must be bummed now, because 2013 LEAFs have a TMS (heater) and it does run while the car is in park. In reality, TMSes are quite important. Nissan blew it by leaving one off. Better to suffer reduced range today due to running the TMS than damage the expensive battery pack.
      chanonissan
      • 1 Year Ago
      @ rotation, nissan have a heat pump , I donot know of any other heater, please post where you get that from. TMS is cooling the heated battery or keep the temp in check, while have heater is doing the opposite.What I know by the use of the heater it help keep the battery warm, once a appliance use electricity there most be some heat lost that is the battery included.
      lad
      • 1 Year Ago
      Want to sell more Leafs? Not a hard question, double the density of the battery pack.
        chanonissan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lad
        I think that the way to go, but it would be done with a redesign model
        Ernie Dunbar
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lad
        We're buying a Leaf right now, actually. Nissan Canada cut the price on their 2012 stock and when talking to the sales guy, he told us that they've sold more in the past month than they have all year. It's the price. Even here in Vancouver where the price of gas is currently exceeding 1.40 a litre (that's the astronomical $5.38/gal for you 'mercans), you're looking at a break-even scenario in terms of cost over the whole lifetime of the car. At the new price of "only" $35k (just under $30k with tax rebate, oh and our dollar is roughly equal to USD at the moment), you're breaking even after about 5 years instead. So it's not even a matter of having a 150+ mile range or not. It's the sticker price. Bring that down, and they'll sell a *lot* more. The good news is, they're doing exactly that.
        neemcavoy
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lad
        who is going to pay the extra $ and haul the extra weight? The range as it is suffices for the average commuter. If you do not have average commuter needs, buy a Volt. If you need a truck, get a truck.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lad
        Well I'm sure they'd like to. But they can only work with the technology currently available. There are much higher density battery chemistry mixes but then you start having safety issues. Engineering is a game of trade-offs.
      lne937s
      • 1 Year Ago
      To get back to the point: The fact that Nissan is willing to put their COO, second in command behind Ghosn in charge of electric vehicles is a sign of their commitment. We can all speculate as to why they did the move, but that doesn't change its significance. Nissan clearly has invested more to date than anyone else in EV's and isn't backing down. It is unlikely any other automaker is going to put the same level of resources behind EV's. IF EV's catch on at a large scale, Nissan will reap the rewards.
        Sasparilla Fizz
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lne937s
        Agreed, I think the critical thing for Nissan is what they do with Generation 2 as they should have started working on that at this point (they need to fix the perceived shortcomings of the platform).
      chanonissan
      • 1 Year Ago
      the 2013 leaf is very different from the older ones, I see some people asking me if I know what the heat pump does, yes it is use to heat the interior, but what they also need to know is the from you are taking juice from a battery it is going to dissipated heat.That what happen when you use the heat pump, the battery dissipated heat, that help the battery to counter the cold weather. The heat pump uses minimal power from the battery so it does not drain it's range as the older electric heater.
      chanonissan
      • 1 Year Ago
      TMS is for keeping the battery cool or at operating temp, it does not work for cold climate, only hot, you need battery warmer or insulation to keep it warm during winter.
        Sasparilla Fizz
        • 1 Year Ago
        @chanonissan
        Well then, Nissan needs to add a TMS for cooling and an enhanced battery warmer to the Leaf to keep the battery in a normal operating temperature (instead of the one it has, which just keeps the batteries from falling below 14 F but doesn't prevent significant range loss as the temperature goes below 32 F). In reality TMS stands for Thermal Management System (and Thermal normally refers to both warm and cold temperatures), depending on how its designed it can cover both (or just one). In the the Chevy Volt and Ford Focus Electric the TMS's keep their batteries in a narrow operating temperature range assuring the best performance and battery/capacity life of those vehicles.
      Sasparilla Fizz
      • 1 Year Ago
      "the company was in a very uncertain phase, and everyone's a bit lost." No need to be lost, from my own opinion are the major issues holding back the vehicle: 1.) Nissan chose to leave out a TMS (Thermal Management System) for the battery pack so you loose a huge chunk of range in cold climates (a big part of the U.S. every year) when you don't have much range to begin with and you want your customers to run the pack @ 80% range (even less range) so it lasts? And of course in really hot areas (AZ) you cook the pack in that steel oven it sits in - no TMS was a huge blunder in judgement. Even just a non heat conductive sleeve that had cabin temp air routed through it would be a huge improvement. 2.) Nissan chose a terrible Li pack chemistry when it comes to cycle capacity durability - so here we have folks who've had the vehicle for a few years and they're loosing noticeable range on the vehicle and are scared of what it means for their range 5 years down the line. Choose a more durable Li battery chemistry. 3.) Barely enough range anyways (~75 miles without heat or air conditioning) and then you want the customers to run it at 80% charge/range so the battery lasts? - total face palm (see problem #2). JMHO of course...
        chanonissan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Sasparilla Fizz
        @ Sasparilla Fizz, no matter what battery heat degrade them in very hot condition to some point, so nissan chemistry is not the only one who will suffer. All li- on batteries (SCIB, nano phosphate) will degrade in heat , only difference is some degrade faster. The only way to prevent battery degrading is have a cooling fan 24/7. "Li+ batteries last longer[101] if not deeply discharge (depleted) before recharging. The smaller the depth of discharge, the longer the battery will last.[citation needed][102] Batteries may last longer if not stored fully discharged. As the battery will self-discharge over time, its voltage will gradually reduce, and when it is depleted below the low-voltage threshold of the protection circuit (2.4 to 2.9 V/cell, depending on chemistry) it will be disabled and cannot be discharged any further until recharged.[101][clarification needed] It is frequently recommended to store batteries at 40% charge level.[101] The rate of degradation of Lithium-ion batteries is strongly temperature-dependent; they degrade much faster if stored or used at higher temperatures. They may be stored in a refrigerator.[103][104]" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium-ion_battery
          Sasparilla Fizz
          • 1 Year Ago
          @chanonissan
          Fortunately the other plug-ins with TMS's are not having the same problem with heat because their TMS's keeps the battery in a good working temperature and the pack is thermally insulated so the outside temps don't get to the pack very quickly or easily (because the pack container itself is thermally insulated (which gets you through the heat or cold of the day). The Leaf's pack is thermally conductive to the outside environment to help it get rid of excess heat as it runs - but when parked over blacktop in AZ (or other really hot places) that means the heat just cooks the battery while the person is inside working. I like the Leaf and would like to see Nissan succeed, but going with their non ventilated steal box battery container for anything other than a Pacific Coast climate was a very bad choice when your energy source is so sensitive to temperatures (both to heat and cold) - and is why all other plug-in manufacturers have gone with the extra expense of a TMS for their packs. Nissan needs to take a step back, notice their competitor's vehicles aren't having the same level of problems and fix it for Generation 2. JMHO of course... The Nissan Li chemistry is not good for cycle capacity life in comparison to other Li chemistries...all will have capacity loss over time, but the Leaf's chemistry is worse than others. Nissan needs to fix this as well - otherwise people will just avoid the car for anything other than leases "cause the battery will die over time" - their warranty is for 70% capacity after 5 years when charging to 100% (that's 52 miles range with no air conditioning or heat at 5 years) which is unacceptable for all but the true believers.
          2 wheeled menace
          • 1 Year Ago
          @chanonissan
          That's not necessarily true. They only degrade in heat if they are producing a lot of heat from high internal resistance + high ambient temp. Ambient temp can't get high enough to degrade the battery alone. Unfortunately this is the case with Nissan's current battery and many other electric car manufacturer's batteries - they are designed in such a way that they will produce excess waste heat when brand new. This situation gets worse ( internal resistance climbs ) as the battery ages. If you design headroom into the C rate of a battery system, this will not be a problem. Otherwise you have to install a battery cooler ( this is what Tesla does ) to prolong the life of the cells, at the expense of extra range during the hot months. I've been using a very large non-thermally controlled pack on my ebikes for 3 years. It performs great in 110F temps down to -10F temps, still. An oversized pack with a good discharge rate might be more expensive up front, but it is cheaper over the long run.
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @chanonissan
          the nissan leaf is the oldest of all EV, but others coming with better chemistry learning from nissan experience,say it make a mistake, not too sure, because it is a learning experience for nissan themselves, the battery operate fine in moderate temp but not in extreme temps. Heard they were working on NMC battery which is the best Lion battery for EV operation.
        David Murray
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Sasparilla Fizz
        This is not entirely true. The 2011 Leaf has no thermal management at all. But, starting with the 2012 model, the Leaf included a battery warmer for cold climates. The only thing it lacks is the ability to cool the battery in hot climates. As for cycle capacity, the chemistry used in the Leaf is just fine, so long as it is kept out of 120 degree climates.
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @David Murray
          actual when you run the heater it keep the cabin warm and heat the battery at the same time ,because the battery is in use, and when driving it becomes warmer. it your choice , but to believe not using the warmer will give more range , not exactly, it is best to warm up car with heat before leaving and keep the heat pump going it uses only 1kw
          Sasparilla Fizz
          • 1 Year Ago
          @David Murray
          The cold battery warmer only kicks in when you get down to about 14 F and raises it to 17F - its something to keep the batteries from getting too cold to work - its not something to keep the battery in a good working temperature, unfortunately. The cycle capacity of the chemistry is awful even outside of AZ, go to the My Nissan Leaf forums and look at what the users are saying, they are going down. Here's a great post by a (happy) Nissan Leaf Owner whose wife has a Ford Focus Electric and their comparative performance in cold weather - the TMS of the Focus Electric makes a huge difference. http://www.mynissanleaf.com/viewtopic.php?f=31&t=11572
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @David Murray
          and the it does not suck at lot of range, as you claim.
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @David Murray
          @Sasparilla Fizz you are mis leading us it was a 2012 leaf. form the article and it quotes Just a quick update on the direct comparison of range of two cars in our family. I have a '12 Leaf and my wife a '12 FFE. I was able to drive my wifes car for the better part of January. I would drive both cars to work, which is a 40 mile round trip commute, non highway, with minimal amounts of hills. Stay around 30-40mph Tires fully inflated, heat the seats, but no blower motor ventilation used. Keep in mind we are in NJ and the weather was at or below freezing in January. The Leaf can safely handle 1.5 roundtrips of my commute or about 60 miles before I reach one bar. I expected the FFE to get the same result. Not even close. The FFE can handle 2.5 roundtrips before reaching a low battery warning. In fact when I hit 100 miles on a single charge the conditions were freezing rain with the temps in the low 20's. I expect the two to have similar range once the weather becomes more mild. But so far very impressed with FFE's the cold weather results
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @David Murray
          the 2013 leaf just went on sale in end of Feb,2013, you are comparing the older model leaf.
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @David Murray
          @Sasparilla Fizz is for cooling not heating so some one is trying something. The word thermal means heat and the word management means to manage, so it mean to manage the heat from the battery, it has nothing to do with cold weather.
          Sasparilla Fizz
          • 1 Year Ago
          @David Murray
          @chanonissan Actually I'm talking about all Leaf's including the 2013. The Heat Pump just makes cabin heat (nothing for the battery) and makes it more efficiently if it isn't too cold (that was a good update). That isn't the problem here....its the effect of the cold outside temperature on the battery itself which drastically reduces its usable range. If you look at that Leaf and Focus Electric owner when he did his comparison - he didn't even run the heater in the Leaf at all - its not the heater (although that was a separate problem since it sucked even more range from the pack when it was cold). http://www.mynissanleaf.com/viewtopic.php?f=31&t=11572
          chanonissan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @David Murray
          @Sasparilla Fizz, sorry you are talking about the older 2011 or 2012 leaf the new one just went on sale recently, which have a heat pump, the older one does not. here is a happy owner from green car report who have no problem in cold climatewith a 2011 leaf. http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1082571_2011-nissan-leaf-at-two-years-32000-miles-no-signs-of-age
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Sasparilla Fizz
        Well, you have to make sacrifices in order to create a product that is reasonably. Did they make the right sacrifices? It is hard to know without knowing all the options they had. And hindsight is 20/20.
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          reasonably affordable.
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      Mine would have looked exactly like that if I could have gotten the color I wanted.
      RC
      • 1 Year Ago
      Want to improve sales? CHAGE the way the DAMN THING LOOKS! I know some folks say it isn't important. But everyone I've shown the LEAF to, thinks it is fcuking ugly.
        jpadow
        • 1 Year Ago
        @RC
        I really don't think it's ugly. I see them driving around DC all the time, and it really just looks like any another hatchback. I think only car-buffs will notice it as an electric car. I mean maybe the rear end baloons out a bit, but I like the cool rear lights. And I think the awesomeness of actually seeing a mass-produced electric car on the road that people are buying, not worrying that their automaker is going to take them back and crush them, outweighs any negative response to its looks.
      Reggie
      • 1 Year Ago
      Leaf sales should surge this year the Geordie boys will get the EV prices down at the Leaf Sunderland plant. They are the most productive workforce in the the world, they are a tough lot. Walk 25 miles to work in 6ft of snow with no T-shirt on when it -12C, work 20 hour day, cook road kill for lunch, work 7 days a week, take 1 days holiday a year all for 20 bucks a month pay, they are not greedy. Beat that Tennessssee.
      David Murray
      • 1 Year Ago
      Something a lot of people seem to be missing about the Leaf is that it is the cheapest all-electric vehicle on the market that is a real EV and not a compliance car. The difference being that Nissan is trying to find a price point that it can sell an electric vehicle AND actually make a profit. It isn't fair to compare the Leaf to vehicles that are being made in limited numbers and sold at a loss just to satisfy the quota of EVs the need to build for California. And while I realize the i-Miev may be cheaper.. it is not even in the same league with the Leaf.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @David Murray
        Actually, both the Mitsubishi-i and the Smart ED are cheaper than the Leaf. But I agree, they are not in the same class as they both seat fewer people (4 in the Mitsubishi-i and 2 in the Smart ED) and have smaller batteries. It is nice that such cheaper vehicles are available.
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