Fans of the Ford Mustang SVO, which was produced from 1884 through 1986 with a turbocharged 2.3-liter four-cylinder engine and a manual transmission, may be interested to know that Ford is reportedly going to introduce something similar for 2015. But don't get too excited if you live in the US, as Edmunds reports that the vehicle will be offered in Europe only. Boo!

According to the report, Ford will put a version of its EcoBoost turbocharged four-cylinder into the engine bay of the Mustang. The engine would be enlarged from its current 2.0 liters to 2.3 liters, taking horsepower from 252 to around 300. The well-known 5.0 V8 engine will also be available in Europe.

"The Mustang is uniquely Ford and has a huge fan base here in Europe. Now those fans have something to look forward to and we look forward to providing more details in the near future," says Ford of Europe CEO Stephen Odell. That's great... but why not offer buyers in the States the (likely) fuel-efficient turbo option, too?


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 140 Comments
      sdwalker85
      • 2 Years Ago
      1884-1986 man that's a long run
      Mudotaku
      • 2 Years Ago
      I didn't know there was a 1884 Mustang. It must had been built by Henry Ford in his youth.
      dricardosimpson
      • 2 Years Ago
      turbo four back in 1884 wow
        rmt_1
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dricardosimpson
        Great Scott!!! Who needs a DeLorean when you have a Mustang SVO, a flux capacitor, and plutonium or a Mr. Fusion to get to 1884.
      Tina Dang
      • 2 Years Ago
      lol at 1884.
      gibbs5988
      • 2 Years Ago
      They probably would have priced the 4 cylinder between the V6 and GT. I think paying more for the smaller engine would be a tough sell in the US.
      Hello, Brian
      • 2 Years Ago
      Jeremy, really. Try proof reading before posting. 1884?
      Willie
      • 2 Years Ago
      The 1884 Mustang "It's ahead of its time." But I hear Consumer Reports did not recommend this model year because reliability and the existence of the car was unknown.
      BipDBo
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Mustang already has a decent engine that produces 300 hp. It's a DI NA V6, that's likely cheaper to produce than the turbo 4 banger. Many European countries tax on engine displacement, so there's an economic benefit to downsizing when there isn't much practical benefit. Turbo 4 bangers are being used alot in FWD cars, not just because they are typically a little more efficient on the EPA cycle than a higher displacement V6 of the same power, but also because they are easy to package in the transverse. I also helps that a transverse 4 crashes well. A V6 fits nicely longitudinally under a Mustang hood.
        rmkensington
        • 2 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        Its probably time for europe to tax on mpg, not displacement.
        Papi L-Gee
        • 2 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        It's not DI, but I agree with everything else you said.
        Josh
        • 2 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        Yeah and its heavier than the ecoboost 4 to boot! the Duratec 37 in the 2011-2014 mustang is not a DI motor. It may have independent breathing but it is as standard a motor as the shared turn stalks on a Taurus and F150, not very efficient or int'l friendly as the ecoboost 4. There are numerous reasons why a 4-cyl instead of the v6 would make sense internationally, the displacement regulations being a big part of it. But if you want to keep pushing outdated 'MOAR CYLINDERS' argument you can but I'm pretty sure all those eurs aching for a new 2015 EU market Mustang won't complain. (and probably aspire to the V8).
          BipDBo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Josh
          Thought it was DI. I stand corrected. It is a pretty efficient motor, though. I would personally prefer a turbo 4 banger over a V6 if I were looking for a Mustang, all other thing being equal, but Ford would probably have to ask more $ for it. I wonder though, how much more mpgs could be obtained with the turbo over the V6. EPA and real world.
      Finklestein
      • 2 Years Ago
      Let's hope for another 102 year model run
      Chris
      • 2 Years Ago
      In all honesty, I am not so sure that a turbo-charged 4 cylinder Mustang would do all that well in this market. Performance oriented Mustangs are pretty much synonymous with V8s. Even a lot of the import guys I've talked to say they would never buy a Mustang without a V8. When you consider that, the new Focus ST, and the fact that the current V6 is no slouch either, it just seems that such a Mustang would have a lot working against its favor. In the US, people who prefer turbo charged 4 cylinders seem to gravitate toward and desire vehicles that are much different from the Mustang, like the Golf GTI, Subaru WRX/STi, Mitsubishi Lancer EVO, etc. etc. With that said, I think a lot of those folks would get much more excited about a return of the Focus RS than a Mustang. It would be interesting to see a new SVO, but I'm just not sure there is a market for it here.
      Avinash Machado
      • 2 Years Ago
      Finally a car for Reggie.
      Sergio Alvarado
      • 2 Years Ago
      People thought the Taurus was groundbreaking in 1986... this Mustang design beat it by 102 years!
    • Load More Comments