There are untold amounts of primping and set up that goes on in the days leading up to an international auto show. Of course, there are exhibits to erect, lights to hang and scripts to rehearse. There are also cars to prep. Usually the latter involves little more than removing finger prints and dusting, but in the case of Maserati the day before the Geneva Motor Show press days, the process apparently includes banging on the sheetmetal of one of your prized showcars like a crazed woodpecker.

We're not sure what caused a surface irregularity in the door skin of this 2014 Quattroporte – perhaps shipping damage – but it was interesting (and mildly painful) to watch, and hear, a show prepper attempt to PDR repair this six-figure sedan with a jeweler's hammer, high-intensity light and soft cloth.

That'll buff right out.

Watch Maserati Get Its Quattroporte Ready For Geneva by Hammering on Sheetm


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 21 Comments
      chromal
      • 1 Year Ago
      It sure beats body filler and repainting the panel/door/whatever. Had this done after a 2" deep dent was added to my hatchback 2010 mazda3 while unattended in a parking lot (no scratch, still think someone kicked the car intentionally). It's amazine how pristine looking a skilled PDR craftsman can make a formerly dented panel appear, but the subtle way they tap at the folds in the steel might as well be black magic. I'm sure Maserati weren't doing this because they wanted to, but your show car is at the show, the show starts tomorrow, and some jackass dented it. What do you do? This.
      mikemaj82
      • 1 Year Ago
      You do know what a dent is, right? Usually when you remove a dent, you don't hammer it in, you hammer it out from the opposite side, hence the term "dent"
        Karfreek
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mikemaj82
        What he is doing is PDR. When you get a dent in your car the metal is stretched. When they push the dent out it will leave a ring in the panel because there is now "slack" in the panel. For a perfect job you then work the metal from the outside because you have to distribute that slack out so the repair is not visible. Pushing the dent out is the easy part, the hard part is working the panel from the out side to get it flawless again. If you look at a PDR kit, most of the tools are for working the dent from the outside surface. Also, most will suction cup a fluorescent grid to the panel that casts a reflection for the PDR tech to see on the finish. Working the dent from the outside is what makes it disappear. I've had this procedure done to my car. To watch them can make you want to pull your hair out. But, if its done by a pro you will never tell the dent was there. mikemaj82: you can choose not to believe me, that is fine. But please tell me what he is doing because no one is stopping him from doing it to a $100k car.
        Dwight Bynum Jr.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mikemaj82
        And this clearly shows you've never once removed a dent from an automobile panel.
          mikemaj82
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Dwight Bynum Jr.
          no because i'm not careless enough to get one. please explain how pounding a hammer into something makes it magically pop out..
          mikemaj82
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Dwight Bynum Jr.
          http://www.pdqtools.com/paintless-dent-removal.aspx "What is Paintless Dent Removal (PDR)? It is a technique for eliminating dents and dings in an auto body panel when the paint hasn't been broken. It is usually less costly than traditional body shop bump and paint repairs. It also offers the advantage of not having to worry about accurate paint matching, as the original paint is not disturbed. Technicians get BEHIND the sheet metal panel through the use of specially designed tools and work and massage the dent FROM BEHIND until the panel is back to its original shape and condition" http://vimeo.com/6642470 http://editorial.autos.msn.com/article.aspx?cp-documentid=434597 How Is It Done? PDR technicians use specialized tools to push the metal back into its original shape FROM BEHIND THE DENT. get a clue man.
        Tina Dang
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mikemaj82
        lmao such an idiot
      Karfreek
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's called paintless dent repair (PDR). Pretty commonplace. I've had it done. Two suggestions: clean and wax the panel before going, and don't watch.
      CharlesM
      • 1 Year Ago
      Haven't you ever seen paintless dent removal before? This is how it's done. It looks and sounds awful, but the results are typically quite good.
      Sharpie
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is quite common in Auto Repair and is done on most new cars on dealer lots.
      mikecouk
      • 1 Year Ago
      Yeah I'm quite shocked as to how little the guy writing the article knows about what's going on here, you're an auto blog for christs sake ! I had PDR done on my car, and must say it's awesome to watch and one step away from wizardry, I have a lot of respect for people who do that for a living !
        Vincent Teron
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mikecouk
        Apparently, Chris Paukert has never had the misfortune of getting his car dinged in a parking lot and having to shell out $120 for a paintless dent repair professional to massage it out. Or maybe Mr. Paukert just takes the bus.
        Kwijiboz
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mikecouk
        I've strutted into the comments section here planning to be the savior to all those with no idea of what they're seeing, but you're spot on. Particularly the wizardry bit. I've described it as a black art, incredible how effective PDR can be ; p
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        Vincent Teron
        • 1 Year Ago
        Costco parking lots are safe (they have huge buffers between stalls.) It's the lots at the grocery stores, sport stadiums, movie theaters and teriyaki joints that kill you.
      zizixx89
      • 1 Year Ago
      You already know that specific car was marked down like 10k
      mbukukanyau
      • 1 Year Ago
      There is some plain Jane thing going on with this car. I am sure its very nice, but it just does not have that Italian swag like other Maserati's
      rmt_1
      • 1 Year Ago
      I know that PDR is becoming almost as common as waxing a car to enhance its appearance under the lights at a car show, but for Maserati to allow such a repair to be performed on their new Quattroporte in front of other people is surprising. I thought the standard practice would be to move the car to a private area or to erect a screen around the car, so that the repairman could do the job without an audience watching. Maserati must have a lot of confidence in that repairman.
      canuckcharlie
      • 1 Year Ago
      this must be the guy who repaired his own Maybach
      themanwithsauce
      • 1 Year Ago
      Could be worse, he could be using the Ding King.
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