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Tesla Motors
would be better served making its Model S electric vehicles compatible with CHAdeMO and SAE combo connector fast-charging stations than by spending time taking on those pesky New York Times journalists who question the car's advertised single-charge range, writes Plug In Cars' John Gartner.

With "Please Compromise" as one of his article's subheadings, Gartner says the Times reporter in question would've had access to an additional two CHAdeMO fast chargers on his East Coast route, the one that he said he couldn't finish because the car ran out of juice. Those chargers can provide about 150 miles of range per hour of charging.

The Model S uses a proprietary fast-charging connector for its small but growing network of Superchargers. Tesla has said it will offer CHAdeMO adapter for cars sold in Japan, but hasn't made specific plans to do the same in the US.

Last month, Tesla chief Elon Musk got into a very public spat with the Times over an article about a Model S test drive, whose veracity was called into question by Musk and a number of other news outlets, as well as a number of Model S owners.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 44 Comments
      Joeviocoe
      • 2 Years Ago
      Glaring spelling error in a title! Danny isn't much better than us commentators.
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      Well I agree that having a good universal standard would be better for everyone. But the USA & German automakers rejected ChadeMo and SAE-Combo didn't exist when Tesla was designing their vehicle. So it is kinda hard to blame them for not adopting a Japanese 'standard' that requires royalty payments and is not that great . . . . and for not adopting a standard that did not exist.
      Grendal
      • 2 Years Ago
      It sounds like someone with an agenda that is cranky because everyone is not leaping to his plan. "Yeah. If you'd just listened to me then you wouldn't be having a problem!" Tesla's lack of CHAdeMO can be fixed with an adapter and some programming. It will eventually happen.
      Andrew Richard Rose
      • 2 Years Ago
      If you had spent the money and time Elon has on Tesla , you would be pis*** too !
      Grendal
      • 2 Years Ago
      Here is a video of Elon explaining how the Supercharger works: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KMzgHnszMkA He says that delivery in Europe will begin in July. The cars will be built in late June.
      kEiThZ
      • 5 Months Ago
      And yet the largest number of calls to AAA/CAA is for running out of gas. You really underestimate the ignorance of the average Joe. Even with an $80 000 car, they'll run out of juice. And worse than running out of juice? Tesla telling people they have turn down the climate control to reach. That's actually inducing range anxiety or worse: it's telling people that their $80 000 car forces them to choose between making to the next charger and staying warm. Not exactly great for Tesla's brand. Tesla wants to compete with BMW, Mercedes, Lexus, etc. Can you imagine any of their Customer Service reps telling you to turn off the heat so you can reach the next gas station? This is not about Broder. I can agree that he wasn't the sharpest knife in the drawer. But I am more worried about the average driver. They matter far more. They can tarnish the brand very quickly. And that's without an article in the NYT. I love Tesla. I hold stock in the company. I do believe they have potential. But when they make boneheaded decisions, I will call them out. If only because I care about my investment.
      raktmn
      • 2 Years Ago
      If all of these plugs all conformed to the same power rating, then I would agree that they should all compromise. But they don't. The regular J1772 plug on all the current charging stations already out there isn't rated to push 90 kW, and neither are the CHAdeMO plugs. It would be stupid for Tesla to artificially limit how fast their SuperCharger system will charge, just to get along for the sake of getting along. Tesla didn't set out to build the SortaNiceCharger system. They built a 90 kW SuperCharger system that has all the wires, all the connectors, and all the circuits rated for way more juice than standard J1772 or CHAdeMO. If the other car companies and charger companies want to catch up to Tesla's far superior plug and chargers that is rated for 90 kW, then they should go talk to Tesla. But there is no way Tesla should be limited by other standards, especially when everyone with inferior chargers haven't even managed to standardize between themselves! SAE was still playing catch-up to Tesla, and hadn't even finished the definition of the J1772 Combo Coupler before the first Model S cars left the production line and were sold to customers. This is a silly story. Of course Tesla had to use their own standard, none of the existing standards were rated for enough power when the Model S went into production.
        Jon
        • 5 Months Ago
        @raktmn
        They could have made the car support CHAdeMO *in addition* to supporting Tesla superchargers. Since CHAdeMO is lower power it would be easy because the electronics on the car can already handle more. This is a valid criticism. Model S supports J1772 via an adapter. Why not have an adapter for CHAdeMO? It just takes a little programming to make the CHAdeMO charger happy. It is possible. They just havent done it.
          JakeY
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Jon
          It takes hardware and licensing to utilize CHAdeMO. The licensing bit is why practically all non-Japanese automakers have avoided CHadeMO (and probably why Tesla has only committed to a Japanese adapter). Tesla can't simply reverse engineer the plug and use it like some hobbyists have done. Because CHAdeMO uses a CAN bus, analog signals, and uses many more pins than other DC standards, Tesla must create a separate box in order to make CHAdeMO work. It's not a simple pin-to-pin adapter like J1772 and just simple programming.
      JakeY
      • 2 Years Ago
      That article was full of errors. First he said that the Model S J1772 adapter was optional, when it is standard (this has since been corrected). Next he said it was unclear if the journalist had the adapter in the car, when it's clear he charged at a J1772 station in Norwich. Next he says there are two CHAdeMO stations along the I-95 route the reporter traveled. But the CHAdeMO map does not indicate any CHAdeMO stations in the vicinity: http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&oe=UTF8&msa=0&msid=210740974077298891697.0004ac7e66a8121c75d8e Nor does Blink Map (the network that the EV Project he mentioned funded): http://www.blinknetwork.com/blinkMap.html Nor does the government's charger map: http://www.afdc.energy.gov/fuels/electricity_locations.html Nor does 350Green (which has a couple of CHAdeMO stations in its network) show a charger there. I also checked the charger aggregators (Recargo, PlugShare) and the only DC chargers that show up are Tesla's. If you look at any of those maps though, it's pretty clear what the problem is with those CHAdeMO chargers. They are all bunched up into a handful of locations. Sure there are 130 CHAdeMO Chargers (vs 100 stations total Tesla has planned for superchargers), but the way they are positioned make them worthless for intercity travel. The only CHAdeMO chargers designed like a real "network" are the ones in Oregon. Tesla's 100 stations will be positioned in a way that allows a Model S to practically travel all across the US. If they continue positioning CHAdeMO stations like they are doing now, I bet even 1000 CHadeMO chargers would not be enough make such travel practical.
        Jim1961
        • 2 Years Ago
        @JakeY
        Jake Y, I could not agree with you more about the distribution of chademo chargers. I live in St. Louis, Missouri. The closest chademo charger to me is located in Chicago. There are about a dozen chademo chargers in the Chicago area which are all very close to each other. DC fast chargers are useless if they are bunched up instead of spread out.
        Rotation
        • 2 Years Ago
        @JakeY
        Who is going to stop for 15 minutes every 50 miles anyway?
      Grendal
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'm not overly worried about a lack of Superchargers. Most Tesla owners, just like gas car owners, won't use their car to drive across the US. When the dust settles I'll bet that less than 1% will use their car for a cross country drive. Right now you are getting a little more than that because people have something to prove. My guess is that most owners will use the Superchargers for shorter trips between large cities. LA to Vegas, Bay Area to LA, Bay Area to Sacramento, and occasionally a slightly longer trip like New York to Chicago will be where the Superchargers get used. I'm glad there are Superchargers. The reality is that they are more a marketing statement than anything else. Build the chargers first and do all the accessories at a later time. Solar panels and Tesla monoliths can come in a few years when they are making money and selling lots of cars. That just my opinion, but it strikes me as a sound business strategy.
      • 2 Years Ago
      As an EV driver I agree 100%. Mr. Musk has publicly stated many times that he has a vision of making the world better by pushing mass adoption of EV technology. He needs to balance his business motives with his philanthropic motives. For example - he could allow other EVs to charge at the Tesla Superchargers for a fee, while still allowing Tesla drivers to use the Superchargers for free. And of course he could make the CHAdeMO-Tesla adaptors available in the United States - after all, how long will it take for someone to starting buying them in Japan and shipping them to the states?
        JP
        • 5 Months Ago
        Allowing other EV's to use the superchargers, even for a fee, means the superchargers will be clogged up with cars, or Tesla would have to build a lot more, neither would be good for Tesla. Tesla needs to do what's best for Tesla right now. The Chademo adapter for Tesla owners is a good idea.
      Levine Levine
      • 2 Years Ago
      Another know-nothing journalist trying to dictate to Elon Musk how to run Tesla. Both Broder and Gartner are frauds who sit behind comfy Lazy Boy sofas and fabricate their nonsense that they insist real innovators must obey. Broder and Gartner are a crock of crap.
        Joeviocoe
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Levine Levine
        Danny King is not even a "know-nothing journalist"... he is a troll writer on this blog, who repeated demonstrates how he know less than the average person who comments here.
      • 2 Years Ago
      I 100% agree and the lack of DC charging for the 40 kwh battery is ridiculous considering iMEV and the leaf have it.
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