We wouldn't blame you if you recoiled from every video about motorcycle builders you saw. After all, American Choppers has effectively conditioned each and every one of us to think stitching together custom bikes involves more drama than your average episode of Jersey Shore. But, as Jared Johnson of Holiday Customs so eloquently illustrates, real life building as all about crafting something that isn't "just a bolt on situation." Even better, the shop focuses on crafting accessible bikes for the masses instead of $25,000 bits of unobtanium. It's clear Johnson wants his bikes to be ridden, not sheltered in someone's forsaken garage.

Sunglasses maker Shwood Eyewear turned its attention to Holiday Customs for the latest in the company's Experiment With Nature video series. The clip succinctly sums up what we love about bikes, wrenching and, fittingly enough, wrenching on bikes. You can check out the video below, and be sure to head over to the Holiday Customs site for daily dose of drool-worthy metal.





I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 10 Comments
      F_Monk
      • 2 Years Ago
      "Bolt on" isn't necessarily a bad word anymore, provided that's not all you do. Back in the old days, before Paco frames and all the aftermarket stuff, you had no choice but to cut on old original frames, fenders, tanks, etc. Well, there's a finite supply of that stuff and it's all skyrocketed in price. So, in some ways, it makes more sense to stretch and rake a Paco then it is to cut up an original UL single downtube frame. My pop is an old-skool builder from wayback, and even his access to "old iron" is drying up. Matter of fact, a lot of the work he does nowadays is straightening 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 year old frames or customizing owner's existing bikes, but every so often he'll do a ground-up bike for a customer, and if they don't supply the frame or forks/can't pay for a Shovelhead or Blockhead frame, he'll start with a Paco and use aftermarket parts as needed/as the budget allows. Still, I'm always amazed when I go to his shop and find him cutting on a springer front end from a Knucklehead or some such.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      johnb
      • 2 Years Ago
      American Choppers isn't a bolt on shop. Just because Jesse James says it doesn't make it the truth.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      pixelaided
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'm sure if someone wanted to give Jared a waterjet, a 5-axis CNC machine and then film him creating his bikes, he wouldn't turn it down.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      SloopJohnB
      • 2 Years Ago
      Rat bikes rule! On the other hand, weld quality isn't exactly nuclear, steering geometry is nominal if not haphazard, materials meh, and quality nowhere near any stock Japanese bike. I have to wonder about the fatigue strength of those weld and the ultimate corrosion resistance of that frame...same comments apply to the OC Choppers type bikes. Of course, they were never designed to go around corners or to stop....just to have a platform to beatch about cages.