UPS said in 2011 that it was acquiring 100 battery-electric delivery trucks for its California operations and has now put the proverbial rubber to the road.

The delivery-service giant has deployed those 100 electric vehicles in the Sacramento, San Bernardino, Bakersfield and Fresno areas. All told, the vehicles, which have a 75-mile single-charge range, should help UPS cut diesel-fuel use by about 126,000 gallons a year. UPS operates more than 2,500 alt-fuel vehicles in the US and acquired these from Stockton, CA-based Electric Vehicles International.

UPS isn't the only company that is putting plugs on delivery vans. Amp recently began testing a medium duty van because, as Amp CEO told AutoblogGreen, getting the diesel out of the delivery can be an effective way to cut fuel use because of those vehicles' high mileage use and city-driving patterns. Last year, UPS competitor FedEx said it was more than doubling its all-electric fleet to 43 vehicles from 19. UPS's press release is available below.
Show full PR text
UPS to Rollout Fleet of Electric Vehicles in California

Marks One of the Single Largest Deployments of Zero Emission Vehicles in the World

SACRAMENTO, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--UPS (NYSE:UPS) today announced the deployment of 100 fully electric commercial vehicles that will be delivering packages around the state. Today's announcement will help implement Governor Jerry Brown's Executive Order to achieve widespread deployment of zero emission vehicles throughout California.

"We currently operate more than 2,500 alternative fuel vehicles worldwide with a variety of hybrid, electric and natural gas technologies, making UPS the leader in logistics sustainability"
"These all-electric vehicles remind us that California continues to be a dynamic center of innovation," said Governor Brown. "These trucks were built here, they'll be driven here and they're already changing the way business is done here – cutting emissions and eliminating the need for tanker trucks worth of fossil fuels."

These UPS electric trucks will reduce the consumption of conventional motor fuel by approximately 126,000 gallons per year. Additional benefits include reduction of carbon emissions and noise. The vehicles have a range of up to 75 miles and primarily will deliver packages to customers in Sacramento, San Bernardino, Ceres, Fresno and Bakersfield.

"We currently operate more than 2,500 alternative fuel vehicles worldwide with a variety of hybrid, electric and natural gas technologies, making UPS the leader in logistics sustainability," said Myron Gray, president of U.S. operations for UPS. "We use our technology and logistics expertise to reduce emissions around the world and help test new automotive technologies."

The partners responsible for making this project a success include the Governor's Office of Business and Economic Development, California Air Resources Board, California Energy Commission, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, South Coast Air Quality Management District, San Joaquin Air Pollution Control District and Sacramento Air Quality Management District.

"EPA's funding of these electric delivery trucks highlights our commitment to the rapid deployment of electric vehicles as a means of cleaning the air, creating jobs and spurring innovation," said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA's Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. "California's communities will benefit from both the local manufacturing of these UPS electric trucks and from the resulting elimination of harmful diesel emissions."

The vehicles were manufactured in Stockton, California by Electric Vehicles International (EVI). The purchase of these vehicles from EVI is also providing new jobs and revenue to the state, as well as creating vehicles that will improve air quality.

To access UPS's sustainability report or find out more about UPS's use of alternative fuel vehicles, go to www.ups.com/sustainability.

UPS (NYSE:UPS) is a global leader in logistics, offering a broad range of solutions including the transportation of packages and freight; the facilitation of international trade, and the deployment of advanced technology to more efficiently manage the world of business. Headquartered in Atlanta, UPS serves more than 220 countries and territories worldwide. The company can be found on the Web at UPS.com and its corporate blog can be found at blog.UPS.com. To get UPS news direct, visit pressroom.UPS.com/RSS.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 86 Comments
      Wwhatever747
      • 1 Year Ago
      It takes gas/oil to produce electric cars and their batteries, once we run out of oil/gas, everything stalls. We have 40-50 years of oil left, too many motorists and airliners taking advantage of that, there's begining and end to everything. Keep horses and cows healthy to last cuz cars trucks or vans or airliners won't be runnin' in the next few generations.
        charpist5
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Wwhatever747
        We have an abundance of oil is this country, and the earth keeps making more. It will not "run out." Americans, however, may "run out" of enough money with which to purchase electric cars and their very expensive batteries.
        dkelmstra
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Wwhatever747
        we have infinite amount of oil / gas in this planet -- we will never run out. In the 70s they said we would be out of oil by 2000 and today we have more proven oil reserves than all the oil we have used for the past 100 yrs and we are finding new oil reserves daily. dont let them fool you into thinking we will run out of oil or gas -- its called natural gas for a reason -- the earth produces it constantly.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Wwhatever747
        Really? No such thing as a solar panel, a hydro generator, a windmill, geothermal energy, nuclear, wave energy? This is what i get for time traveling and learning about all this cool stuff that doesn't exist yet. What a let down. you're right, all energy comes from fossil fuels *sighs*
        marcanagnos
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Wwhatever747
        We have plenty of oil, it just may cost more to get it out of the ground. In the Middle East a barrel costs about $13.00 to produce. It's like $66.00 or so in the Candian oil sands. So if the oil goes for $50 a barrel OPEC would be fine but the oil sands would go under. There isn't enough lithium to produce these batteries in big enough numbers right now. And guess where most of that comes from? The MIDDLE EAST!!!! MARC
      arenadood
      • 1 Year Ago
      For the time being I think Natural Gas conversion is the best choice until they can get more life and mileage from electric powered delivery vehicles.
        j
        • 1 Year Ago
        @arenadood
        Good point arenadood. By the way, how much life and mileage do they get from their electric powered delivery vehicles.
      Larry
      • 1 Year Ago
      You knoe FedEx and UPS are thinking of merging. If they do, it'll be called FedUp!
      Weapon
      • 1 Year Ago
      I am pretty sure we will run out of money to buy oil before we run out of money to buy batteries. The price of batteries are going down while price of gasoline is going up. As far as the earth "replenishing oil", at what rate? And how easy is it to get to these "reserves"? So yes we are sitting on a mass abundance of oil, 90% of which is not economically feasible to recover. To add to that most of our oil is oil shale which after years of research have not found a commercially viable way to use. But I agree people like you guys should be given all the oil shale they want while the rest of us move on to realistic and viable technologies like EVs.
      pm0501
      • 1 Year Ago
      People who drive electric cars should be taxed by the mile! The loss in gasoline tax revenue is taking away funds needed to repair and maintain roads. Same for bicyclists! They need to pay a road use tax. No more free rides!
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @pm0501
        I'd be happy to pay a road tax on my bicycle if it meant that they actually gave me roads to ride on, rather than putting a sign out that implies that pedaling a bike at 15mph on a 25-45mph road is a legit thing to do. Tax me.
      • 1 Year Ago
      Big White
      HAT1701D
      • 1 Year Ago
      In a large city, with all the constant stop and go plus running their on board scanning computer and GPS equipment....That battery won't last as long as 75 miles. Also the load's weight will affect range as well.
        j
        • 1 Year Ago
        @HAT1701D
        I agree with weapon. Does it seem like plugging in a cell phone into a cigarette outlet in your car will kill your ability to commute to work and home again. Computing takes a miniscule FRACTION of the energy propulsion will require.
        Dave D
        • 1 Year Ago
        @HAT1701D
        Do you know how electrics work? That they get better mileage in city with stop and go traffic than they do on the open road? They have regenerative braking that gives them a big advantage over ICE in that environment. Also note they have already put them into service. If they weren't getting the miles needed, we'd already know about it. Do you not know these things are were you just trolling and green forum for a fight?
        Weapon
        • 1 Year Ago
        @HAT1701D
        I'll put it in perspective, your cellphone is capable of GPS and scanning and everything. And if you charged your phone for a year, you would probably use up maybe a mile? Your phone is using up 5 watts of power per hour charging. So the equipment won't even eat up 1 mile,
      jacqueline
      • 1 Year Ago
      have you noticed that if gas prices go down, UPS rates don't? they just keep raising them - on any excuse- 10 cent gas raise, 35cent UPS increase - 10 cent gas decrease, no UPS decrease -- now we'll be paying according to electricity rates
        knarf714
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jacqueline
        But gas prices never go down as much, they alwys level off at a higher level..then go up again. Businesses cost increases are always behind that power curve.
        visconti24
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jacqueline
        But that is their business. If they want to charge $100.00 to deliver a small package they can. We have the right to choose another company to do that service for us. They are not the only ones.
        Jesse Gurr
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jacqueline
        same can be said for USPS postage stamps. I don't ever remember them going down in price, ever.
      dkelmstra
      • 1 Year Ago
      did UPS think how is electricity generated? its generated by gas or oil or coal. people forget electric vehicles still require use of fuels to generate the electricity.
        marcanagnos
        • 1 Year Ago
        @dkelmstra
        This is all for show, for one thing these vehicles can't pull much weight. Second, no federally required window defrosters, or a/c. It only would work with envelopes. Better idea would be to use CNG, which they already do with USPS and some UPS vehicles in the NYC area. MARC
        Nancy
        • 1 Year Ago
        @dkelmstra
        Perhaps it is a matter of cutting down on energy use. At least they are trying instead being all negative and sh*t.
        j
        • 1 Year Ago
        @dkelmstra
        Did you notice the 100 trucks are in California's inland valleys? Is electricity made from oil there? Isn't most of Ca's electricity from hyrdo and nat gas? Aren't Ca's inland valleys some of the highest users of bio mass? In the entire US oil is 1% and coal is 33% of the source of electricity.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @dkelmstra
        lol, can't pull much weight.. sure. Yeah, electric motors aren't known for their torque or anything. Yeah, they're not used in industrial applications to do heavy lifting either. And i don't have an 18 pound motor that pushes 150 ft-lb from a stall on my bike. You're right, total fail.
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      "EPA's funding of these electric delivery trucks highlights our commitment to the rapid deployment of electric vehicles as a means of cleaning the air, creating jobs and spurring innovation" Ah, and i was thinking they bought them with their own money because they made sense, not that this money came from the public.
        Weapon
        • 1 Year Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        From the looks of it, this is an EPA fund that subsidized the cost of the vehicles. UPS did not get them free. The trucks are also fully manufactured in the US by requirement. And last of all, they are required to collect data during this trial period. The EPA is paying around 1.5 million for this specific project and UPS+EVI+CARB are paying 3.472 million.
      Breconeer
      • 1 Year Ago
      So now we have three very similar battery powered step-vans to choose from - with competition between EVI, Smith Electric, and AMP, all of whom appear to consider delivery fleets a worthwhile market..
      al pambuena
      • 1 Year Ago
      ups is known for its fast and prompt deliveries...i see some major problems here with the battery to weight ratios vs speed of the trucks getting around town...75 miles is nothing for a ups truck on a daily basis...so i do not see the delivery quotas, which means that for whatever they save in fuel will mean more runs and delays on certain deliveries.....i would have used lp gas...but what the hell, its california, and i cant wait for the big one to hit, so that i can have beachfront property in arizona.
        samuel
        • 1 Year Ago
        @al pambuena
        Echo Automotive has come up with a bolt on electric powertrain that quickly converts gas/diesel engines to hybrids. It's a very cutting edge product. It saves 50% of the fuel, and if there is ever a malfunction, it automatically converts back to the combustion power. Look for this product on UPS, Fed Ex, and other fleet vehicles.
        shenson1116
        • 1 Year Ago
        @al pambuena
        It would make more sense if they were electric/gas combo trucks.
        Weapon
        • 1 Year Ago
        @al pambuena
        Actually most of the time, the UPS truck is not traveling distances, it is standing still wasting gasoline. For every 2 minutes it stands the gas car would burn a mile. Where you live in Arizona, it makes little sense to have UPS trucks with 75 miles range. In denser city areas on the other hand, 75 miles is more than enough. Also UPS actually deploys all kind of trucks from ones running on gasoline to ones running on natural gas, to ones running on diesel to ones that are EV/diesel hybrids to ones running on propane. EV is just their next step for experimenting with different technologies. Overall I think EV will be a winner in cities and hybrids will be the winner in more rural areas.(at least fot the next 5-8 years)
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