As dearly as we love the Toyota GT86 / Scion FR-S / Subaru BRZ franchise, we readily admit we wouldn't look sideways at a model with a bit more firepower. And while that's not quite on the table yet, Toyota has been busy amping up the visual firepower of its rear-drive coupe with a whole host of TRD parts. To this point, that's been a largely à la carte affair, but the automaker's UK outpost has just announced a special-edition model that allows our British friends to pick up the whole shooting match all in one go.

The Toyota GT86 TRD will only be available in black and white, and just 250 examples are to be built. As you can see from the excellent gallery above, the catalog of look-faster bits include a more aggressive front air dam, side skirts, rear bumper fascia, spoiler and unique 18-inch forged alloys. Additional flourishes include a TRD shift lever and branded radiator cap. The sole concession to actual performance? A "fast-response quad exhaust" that might only improve things audibly – 0-62 mph is apparently unchanged at 7.7 seconds, and the top end is still 140 mph for the manual transmission model. (The auto gets by with 8.4 seconds and 130 mph).

Pricing? Glad you asked. £31,495 for GT 86 TRD manual, £32,995 for the automatic – that's nearly $50,000 US for the tripedalist and just over for the automatic. (Those are heady prices, but bear in mind that UK MSRPs and taxes are generally significantly higher than their US counterparts). If the standard GT86 is more your speed, it still rings up at a more affordable £24,995 – roughly $39,500 – leaving plenty of budget for actual performance parts. No word yet on North American availability of a special TRD model, but we've got a call in...
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TOYOTA GT86 TRD – IT'S OFFICIAL

New GT86 TRD adds impact to Toyota's sports coupe


- First official UK model grade to feature genuine TRD parts
- Features include forged 18-inch alloys, front and side skirts, rear spoiler, fast-response quad exhaust and TRD-branded details
- Only 250 available in the UK, on sale from 1 March
- On-the-road prices £31,495 for GT 86 TRD manual, £32,995 for the automatic


Since its launch last year, the Toyota GT86 has revitalised Toyota's reputation for building cars that are all about the pure pleasure of driving. Now the hugely acclaimed sports coupe – shortlisted for both European and World Car of the Year awards – gains even more appeal with the introduction of the new GT86 TRD.

Just 250 examples will be available, equipped with genuine design and performance features from TRD (Toyota Racing Development), one of the world's most accomplished and successful after market engineering businesses.

GT86 is the first UK Toyota for which official TRD parts have been used to create a specific production model grade.

The GT86 TRD , on sale from 1 March, will create a new halo model for the 2+2 coupe range. Both six-speed manual and automatic versions will be available, in a choice of two colours: Pearl White and GT86 Black. On-the-road prices are £31,495 for the manual and £32,995 for the auto.

The focus is on sports styling, but not at the cost of GT86's essential performance and handling character. The package includes 18-inch cast TF6 alloys, deep front and side skirts, a rear bumper spoiler and a fast-response quad-exhaust system with a rear diffuser to increase stability. The TRD touches also extended to a branded radiator cap and fuel filler cover, while inside the car there is a new TRD gear shift lever.

These items are all in addition to GT86's established equipment specification, which includes HID headlamps, front fog lamps, limited slip differential, Smart Entry and Start, dual-zone climate control, analogue dials and meters, drilled aluminium pedals, sports seats, scuff plates, cruise control and the Toyota Touch multimedia system.

Acceleration and maximum speed are unchanged at 7.7 seconds for 0-62mph and 140mph for the manual and 8.4 seconds and 130mph for the automatic. There are slight changes in fuel consumption and emissions: 192g/km and 34.9mpg for the manual and 181g/km and 36.2mpg for the automatic (all figures official combined cycle).

ENDS


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  • 74 Comments
      imag
      • 1 Year Ago
      If either Toyota or Subaru will release an uprated version here in the US with more horsepower and real brakes, they will get my my money. I love the car, but the current horsepower and brakes just don't cut it. And some of us do not feel like dropping $5K+ on mods to a new car.
      Mazdaspeed6
      • 1 Year Ago
      If the BRZ was available with a turbo and had these parts installed, I would buy it tomorrow. Acceleration and handling don't have to be mutually exclusive.
      J
      • 1 Year Ago
      the performance numbers ruins everything for me
      PiCASSO
      • 1 Year Ago
      I have to admit, that I like this OEM kit...
      tf3lau
      • 1 Year Ago
      The wheels on this remind me of the 7 spoke Limited trim wheels offered on the first gen RSX, they didn't quite go with the sporty shape of the car.
      Brodz
      • 1 Year Ago
      Looks great... but looks are not just what one one wants from a group that has the words 'Racing' and 'Development' in it's title
      gary
      • 1 Year Ago
      I though the standard Toybaru wheels were about as ugly as it could get. Guess I was wrong, these are worse.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        J
        • 1 Year Ago
        I can appreciate a car like this for where I'm living in Italy, but in Phoenix where I call home, it's pretty much a grid--straight drive everywhere. This car just wouldn't do it for me.
        F_Monk
        • 1 Year Ago
        You really don't know what a "sports car" is, do you? That remark alone marks you as disingenuous. I suspect if there were no Toyota connection to this car, you'd have a different attitude. Whatever, your opinion simply doesn't matter when people who drive, race and review cars for a living, and my own experience with this car, stand in such sharp contrast to it.
        • 1 Year Ago
        [blocked]
        • 1 Year Ago
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        Donny Hoover
        • 1 Year Ago
        I don't agree with WJK and I like the car but the fact is the thing is still slow and could be improved. Sure you can have fun in the corners but this car would not be made worse by adding power. What's more, the people on here ravenously attacking anybody who suggest that the car needs more power, even those who do it nicely and claim to like it, are very puzzling. Imagine a lightly modded turbo 86 running straights with a 5.0 stang and then slaughtering it in the corners. Never gonna happen if they keep it NA.
      Big D Design
      • 1 Year Ago
      There is no way that the 0-60 93 octane gas in my FRS is getting only seven seconds to 60. It is in the 6 point something range. At 58 mph, I have to go to 3rd gear to get to 60. These numbers don\'t show what the powerband of this car has available. Honda S2000 is no where near the feel of this NA engine. OK. Next.... I live where the roads are glass smooth. I have put Dunlop Direzza tires on the car. There are many places where the road takes a curve. If you can name a car that goes thru these corners better than the FRS.... I would like to know. This is one of the best handling cars in the world. PEROID. The powerband allows so much fun if you know how to wring it out. Some days I feel underpowered. Other days it feels majesitc how the power comes on. Learn how to rev it properly and you will get rewards. Find places or race tracks that test your skills and you will be amazed. Don\'t tell me that a porsche 911 being 400 pounds heavier feels better around some of the curves I have taken. I\'m 55 and have been racing cars of all types for more years than some of you are old. This car with the right tires and lightweight wheels is the handling benchmark, not the Mx5. When my warranty runs out.... I will upgrade the crap out of it. Just like all the other cars I have owned. Stop whining. This is sports car history. My most powerful car has just under 600 hp. It is a freaking blast. The FRS is just as good, but in a different way. Blonde or Brunette. Get it. Thanks for listening.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Big D Design
        [blocked]
          bchreng
          • 1 Year Ago
          No but yours certainly does.
          • 1 Year Ago
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          • 1 Year Ago
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      mbukukanyau
      • 1 Year Ago
      For me Toyota died with the death of Toyota Team Europe. With that Toyota became the favorite brand for Jihadists everywhere Death to TRD
        Bernard
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mbukukanyau
        Well, you can't wage Jihad in a broken down Peugot, Renault, or Vauxhaull.
        Al Terego
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mbukukanyau
        "Death to TRD" actually sounds like something jihadists would shout. Irony.
      activex101
      • 1 Year Ago
      The BRZ and FRS are the new riceboy favorite. They're everywhere. Most of the children who drive them seem to think that their car approaches the performance level of a Porsche. This car could have been taken seriously if Toyota had done a few things differently: avoided branding it with the Scion name, given it 100 more HP and charged more to keep it out of the hands of the kids. It's really not a bad car, but I wouldn't be seen dead in one because of the reputation they're getting.
        mbukukanyau
        • 1 Year Ago
        @activex101
        I am off to eat my bowl of rice.
        lazybeans
        • 1 Year Ago
        @activex101
        This will be the Integra of this generation, except with more crashes due to it's neutral RWD manners. This is more like a training car for people who want to learn how to go fast driving a slow car.
        ToyotaSupraMan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @activex101
        "avoided branding it with the Scion name, given it 100 more HP and charged more to keep it out of the hands of the kids." You seem to miss the point of the car. It's like it is because there isn't anything like it in the market. It's enthusiast-directed, seems to be a joy to drive and it's been the target of almost every aftermarket company in Japan (see how many Toyobarus were at the Tokyo Auto Salon). Besides, not only kids have problems buying more expensive cars, you know.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ToyotaSupraMan
          [blocked]
        Al Terego
        • 1 Year Ago
        @activex101
        Stick to your 1.5HP electric wheelchair, grandpa.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @activex101
        [blocked]
      Jmaister
      • 1 Year Ago
      I sense toyota employee roaming here.
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