It's not subtle, but what commercial is? A new, one-minute video called Gallons Of Light does an expert job highlighting the invisible benefits of electric drive: getting energy from sunlight while roadtripping in a Tesla Model S.

It may look and sound top-notch, but this is not an official Tesla video, it is the work of a fan. As you can probably tell by watching the video below, it is also not the work of a video amateur. No, the man behind the "ad" is Jordan Bloch, who has apparently also made videos for companies like Nike, British Airways and Nissan.

It's too much to spoil the entire video for you (and it'll only take 60-seconds to watch for yourself), but the gist of the spot is that – with the right EV – you can go on free road trips, powered by the sun. It's a compelling little video, digesting a lot of arguments in favor of the Model S into one well-lit chunk. The story of how this video came to be is just as interesting, and it available here. One excerpt:

And here we were, a small team of young filmmakers hungry to make a difference in the world. When it came to the issue of financing the commercial, it wasn't a matter of if but how we would complete the project with our limited resources (remember, Tesla was not paying us to do this). That left us utilizing "old school" technology for our camera rigging. It's not what the big budget commercial guys use, but it did the trick.

Good stuff.





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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 55 Comments
      • 1 Year Ago
      Come on Elon, pull your finger out and get this advert on national tv. No matter the cost it will easily pay for itself in no time at all. Then hire the producer to make one for the model X.
        Commentotron
        • 2 Days Ago
        He doesn't need to advertise. The people who want these are buying them. But once the monied nerds have their cars Tesla production will scale back. Plus, even with the charge stations, 85Kwh doesn't cut it. I can drive from Seattle to Canon Beach, OR in my A4 and have about half a tank left when I get there and I don't need to turn off the AC to do it. Or stop. Although we do. The EVs need to match that, and that's just the cold hard facts. Ohhhh. You can go "300 miles" as long as you drive like grandma. Does the S leave the blinker on for you too? LOL. They are beautiful cars and feats of engineering as well as a glimpse of the future. But they are not there yet.
          JP
          • 2 Days Ago
          @Commentotron
          Actually they are here now, and work just fine for people with a clue. Most people don't take long trips very often, and when they do there are other options. The range issue is overblown.
      • 1 Year Ago
      There is NO way a single solar panel installation along the I-5 could supply enough capacity to perform a DC fast charge for multiple (dozens?) of vehicles a day, pumping between 40-80 kWhrs per car. This commercial is extremely misleading in that it claims his road trip was 'sun-powered'. These charging stations are definitely grid connected, and probably only get 5-10% of their power from the installed solar. Nice spin...
        Nick Kordich
        • 2 Days Ago
        Of course they're grid connected - so are Solar City's panels feeding into the grid elsewhere. Tesla Motors' promise was that the project would put more solar power onto the grid than it will take off. You can call them a liar, but don't base it on the largely symbolic solar arrays at some of the Supercharger sites.
          Nick Kordich
          • 2 Days Ago
          @Nick Kordich
          @Stefan - I think there are differences of opinion on this. If you have grid-tied solar cells on your house, large enough to offset your EV's use, I can see an argument for saying your car's 'driving on solar' even though it charged at night. The idea is that you are offsetting the power you're using, so that the grid acts a vast battery - account for the loss of storage/transmission, and you have an impact similar to a non-grid solar system. Non-grid solar stations would be far less practical and far less efficient, and wouldn't contribute solar to the grid when there are no cars charging - not to mention those in the northeast would currently be covered in snow. Aside from some calculators, most solar installations are grid-tied, but people still say they're using solar. If you want to consider your power from the grid "just the same" as this, talk to your utility. Many offer to buy additional electricity from a solar provider or other 'green' source to cover your usage. From what I've seen, they charge a premium of 1.5 to 5 cents per kWh. You still draw power from the grid, but the net effect is supposed to be that enough power goes into the grid from a non-polluting or non-fossil fuel source that it offsets your usage - the more you use, the more they buy.
          • 2 Days Ago
          @Nick Kordich
          What I'm saying is, by boasting that all of your driving is coming from 'light' is mis-informative, especially about the supercharge stations. I charge my plug-in vehicle from the grid, all the same- which happens to be majority natural gas powered. Still a nice video.
        JP
        • 2 Days Ago
        For the nitpickers the commercial says "Sponsored by the sun", which does not mean necessarily that the entire trip was supplied by sunlight. A sponsor can provide partial support.
      David Murray
      • 1 Year Ago
      Very well made!
      Giza Plateau
      • 1 Year Ago
      Satan wont be happy about this. When you do this hippie stuff do you think of all the soldiers you put out of work? NO! They need some brown people to kill.
      ANTM
      • 1 Year Ago
      "All they had to do was accept gallons of light" - and write a fat check!
        johnrysf
        • 2 Days Ago
        @ANTM
        ANTM: Cheap shot, in error. If such cuteness is a joke, it fails for me, as I'm not feeling the ha ha. As Consumer Reports ("best car ever tested"), Motor Trend (Car of the Year), Automobile magazine (Automobile of the Year), Yahoo Autos (Car of the Year), and EVERY other auto journalist has pointed out, you get an excellent value for the "fat check" you write. They all say the loaded $100K+ Model S matches, or exceeds, the best in class, such as the Benz S-series, BMW 7-series, Audi S8/R8, and Porsche Panamera. And that's before you consider its advantages as an EV. Is $50K not so "fat" for you? Get an unoptioned 80KW Model S, collect your $7,500 federal tax credit, plus $2,000 state tax credit, if in CA. Want a moderately-priced Tesla sedan for the masses? Musk has, since the beginning, and most recently at Tesla's shareholders' meeting last month, said that THAT is the real bogey, now slated for early 2015 production. Stop whining.
      dg
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wow.
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Year Ago
      @ Joeviocoe Do you really think 'Big Oil' cares, about sales of 20,000 vehicles, with a demand of 3-4 billion fossil fuels engines ? Nor does "Big Oil" care about the conspiracy theories of internet cranks. What big oil is concerned about, is where to find more oil to meet increasing demand, not worry about how to sell more ! Oil depletion is very real. The main concern of oil companies has been to develop better and more efficient extraction technology. Demand exceeds supply, this situation will get worse as the rate of expansion of oil extraction technology slows down, and all the economic production starts to become unproductive. That's the real issue facing the future, not silly conspiracy theories.
      mazdamattyp5
      • 1 Year Ago
      You know a company has done it right when the demand FAR outrips the supply for multiple years, wins every major award and has "ordinary motorists" taking notice. I live in Alabama and I've seen 4-6 here so far. The power company uses them for their execs. The lower level guys get Volts and Leaves. The BIG guys get the Tesla roadsters (of which they have 2).
      wtrmlnjuc
      • 1 Year Ago
      That was extremely well made.
      Nick Kordich
      • 2 Days Ago
      @alistair.dillingham - You give up too easily, probably because it's a problem you aren't interested in solving. Aerogel offers 40 times the insulation of fiberglass, allowing for very compact insulation, and it has been coming down in price. I assume the initial focus in the active battery temperature control was cooling the pack, but greater insulation from heat off the road in hot weather and improved resistance to heat loss overnight are areas I expect they can improve without reducing the overall effectiveness of their first design (second, counting the Roadster). The question is whether Tesla Motors will consider the current cold-weather effect serious enough to require a modification, either to their default battery pack or as part of an "extreme weather" package, as is offered on ICE vehicles. I'm guessing they'll make the latter available as an option when they have an update to the Model S design (which I've been guessing will be around the time of the Model X release).
      Kenny
      • 1 Year Ago
      Visually-stunning commercial. I've seen a few Model S' in the Dallas area, it certainly is a head turner.
      Grendal
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'm sure there will be an article out soon. The NYT article that the troll, alistair dillingham, brought up was just called out by Elon Musk as faked. They pulled the records on the car and the guy intentionally didn't charge the car to full and didn't drive where he said he had. In fact, he took a long detour to drain the batteries. So the reporter created the circumstances to create controversy for his article. That will probably ruin his career.
        Grendal
        • 2 Days Ago
        @Grendal
        http://www.cnbc.com/id/100439335 Video of the CNBC interview.
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