Just when you think that technology is making it harder for thieves to steal cars or the contents inside of them, it turns out criminals have it easier than ever.

Check out this video, in which a thief merely pushes a button and has instant access to his chosen prey. Police say thieves have found a way to mimic the wireless remote entry signal found on many drivers' key chains.

A string of such break-ins has occurred in Chicago, where police department Sgt. Andrew Schoeff tells ABC News: "We believe this code-grabbing technology was utilized" in several crimes.

There are no firm car-theft numbers that distinguish between methods used to gain entry in car-related thefts, but the most-stolen vehicles are decidedly low tech – in many cases, they are more than a decade old.

According to the National Insurance Crime Bureau, these were most frequently stolen cars in America in 2011, the most recent year for which there is complete data: 1. 1994 Honda Accord; 2. 1998 Honda Civic; 3. 2006 Ford F-Series; 4. 1991 Toyota Camry; 5. 2000 Dodge Caravan.

The best advice for keeping your car safe?

1. It probably sounds obvious, but isn't to too many people: Don't leave valuables in plain sight in the car.

2. Some thieves aren't as savvy as the ones in Chicago and are stealing cars the old-fashioned way: Either smashing their way in or preying on people who forget to lock their doors. So it may not stop criminal software engineers, but you'll increase your chances of staying safe by simply locking the doors.

3. Don't leave a valet key in an obvious spot. Or don't use one at all.

4. Consider using a mechanical device like The Club in addition to whatever electronic device you have.

5. Location, location, location. Park your car in well-lit lots or garages.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 160 Comments
      jfrank5317
      • 2 Years Ago
      Who writes this advice stuff for HuffPost? The club will only slow down a car thief for about 14 seconds. Sheesh!
        kingofswords72
        • 2 Years Ago
        @jfrank5317
        How would a car thief get the club off? I've seen them advertised, never owned a "club".
          Murad
          • 2 Years Ago
          @kingofswords72
          hacksaw
          Hello Lisa
          • 2 Years Ago
          @kingofswords72
          bend the steering wheel, not as hard as it sounds
          alderaforall
          • 2 Years Ago
          @kingofswords72
          you only need a hacksaw. Cut through the steering wheel, which takes only a moment, and you are the proud new owner of the car.
        Jim
        • 2 Years Ago
        @jfrank5317
        At least it is a deterrent. If my can has a club, and your's doesn't, which car do you suppose the thief is going to steal?
      coledude
      • 2 Years Ago
      I had a 1982 Ford Bronco that was lifted and tricked out. On the Bronco you could remove the rear shell and the back was totally open with a bench seat. I was in Venice Ca at the beach and decided to stop real quickly later that night to visit a friend. Well, 10 minutes into my visit there was a huge ruckus going on outside so we went out to investigate. When we got outside there was a man being pulled back toward the inside of my car by his huddie, and at his feet was my leather jacket and a shaving bad I kept personal stuff in. It appears that as he was reaching into the back of my truck stealing my stuff he neglected to notice my dog Berlin (a 130 German Rottweiler) sleeping on the rear bench seat. I kid you not when I say he pissed himself. Berlin was pulling so hard that he could not get out of his huddie and was actually choking. It took some convincing to get her to let go and when she did I have never seen anyone run so damn fast. I really miss that dog, she lived to the happy old age of 12 and was the best friend and car alarm I ever had..
      • 2 Years Ago
      Its easier to do this than most think.
      bennettjoey
      • 2 Years Ago
      It looks like to me that he is just walking down the street where there are a lot of cars waiting for device to activate the car locks. As though it is not used specifically for a certain type of car. In the video he looks back and notices the lights go on then enters the car.
      britishsteel
      • 2 Years Ago
      locks are for honest people.
      Phil Collins
      • 2 Years Ago
      I always keep my car locked in the garage and so far so good but I am going thru more shoes then I would like to.
      jrepairguy
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Club???!! Are you serious???! All a car thief has to do is take a hacksaw and cut the steering wheel, give it a quick flex, and off pops the Club, which is perhaps one of THE most stupid anti-theft devices in the world! I'd feel much better protected against theft if something as moronic as The Club was NOT clearly visible and attached to my steering wheel, because most of the time, if the vehicle's owner has The Club attached, it's a pretty safe bet that this is the ONLY "anti-theft system" "protection" in use on that particular vehicle. Every time I walk by a parked car and see this useless piece of junk attached to the steering wheel, I always think to myself, what a fool....if this guy only knew how easy it is for a car thief to remove this worthless device and drive off with their car, they'd think twice before buying one! My local news program showed just how much of a joke The Club really is a few years ago.....it took all of maybe 10-15 minutes for the guy to smash the window, hop into the driver's seat, cut the steering wheel with a hacksaw and pop that Club right off,,,,,,,and then he drove away with the car. I would urge anyone who is thinking that The Club might offer anti-theft protection to seriously think again, because it definitely will NOT.
      wongtpa
      • 2 Years Ago
      Chicago, another crime story in Obama's home town!
        JamminJohnny13
        • 2 Years Ago
        @wongtpa
        this is not Obamas home town how many times you people got to be told this he just friggin lives here from time to time
          • 2 Years Ago
          @JamminJohnny13
          We know ---- believe me we know his home town is kenya or indonesia...
      People-just-get-dumb
      • 2 Years Ago
      I went to a BK once and hit the lock button on my key fob as I was walking into the restaurant....I set off the panic alarm to a Cadillac a few cars over....for the next 15 min I was tripping this guys alarm and he had no idea why it was going off....lol
      • 2 Years Ago
      So... what have we learned... ??? We have learned... the cops are stll looking for the culprit... due to the fact that the camera systems video was of such poor quality... you can hardly see facial features... What good did it do to spend ANY money on a survellance system when you can'e even see liscence plate numers or post a reward on a flyer for the guy with the blurr face... Bet he's upgrading his camera NOIW.... perfect example of the technoligically blind buying what they imagine to be High Tech. devices from China... Looks good, and you think you got some value till you try and use it... Allways CONSULT a professional for advice... he would have laughed at this system ... and so is the guy breaking into the cars in that neighborhood....
      DavidFredrickson
      • 2 Years Ago
      A cousin, (at that time was seeing a guy who was a reformed car thief), told me that a better deterent is the brake lock. Why, not the Club? The steering wheel has a small metal rod in the center that a hack saw can cut through in seconds and for the price of a new steering wheel they have a new(er) car or a boat load of part$.
      JE WA ZA WI
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's not so much what they steal,but all the damage thieves do ,in the interior of thw auto, looking for change .Had a bunch of quarters for tolls,and thieves did $ 600 of damage breaking and tearing into ashtray and door pockets .
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