From kickoff through the blackout and on to the Baltimore Ravens walking away victorious at Super Bowl XLVII, advertising analysts were tracking the impact of all those very expensive commercials. Automakers and their agencies were no exception here, which means there's been plenty of data logged in terms of which car spots actually succeeded or flopped.

Of course, as next-day results can't exactly be measured by counting up how many folks ran out and bought a new car, judging audience reaction can be a tricky business. As evidence, we've read through (and watched) some early analysis pieces from various sources, and none of them can agree on which commercial was the most powerful of the night. Not even close, in fact.

We've read through the early analysis from various sources, and none of them can agree on which commercial was the most powerful of the night. Not even close.

"Lift" is a common marketing term and basis for measuring the success of a particular piece of advertising; the term refers roughly to the improvement in audience response to a product after viewing the advertisement. Using data from Edmunds about the lift generated by auto commercials during the big game, The Truth About Cars reported that Mercedes-Benz was the night's big winner. TTAC maintained that the CLA Soul advertisement generated a whopping 3,067% of lift when it aired in the fourth quarter. The report also indicated that Volkswagen's Get Happy ad and Lincoln's Phoenix spot for the new MKZ were among the poorest performers on the night.

In an entirely separate study, car-number crunchers Autometrics had some dramatically different results (see the press release, below). In its report, Autometrics found the Lincoln MKZ spot to be the most successful of the evening, with an event-leading 42 increase in "prospects."

Moving into anecdotal review of the commercials, we see some evidence that the tenderhearted ads from Ram and Jeep were winners on the evening. USA Today interviewed former General Motors and Hyundai marketing chief Joel Ewanick, who personally found Ram's Farmer commercial to be the most compelling. Ewanick reportedly considered Jeep's Whole Again tribute to American servicemen and servicewomen to be the "second-best" spot. Of course, if you ask media expert Frank Luntz of CBS to talk about his reaction data, he'll tell you that Farmer was one of the least successful ads of the game, while Kia's Space Babies commercial was the toast of the Super Bowl as far as car makers go. Oh, and Luntz also claims that the CLA spot that the Edmunds data loved was "not distinguishable." Go figure. Scroll down to watch the CBS breakdown video, below.

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BIRMINGHAM, Mich., Feb. 4, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Autometrics announces the official impact on demand of Super Bowl vehicle commercials, where a specific model was featured.

Using patent-pending methodology to collate data from over 100 third party automotive websites, Autometrics scores commercials based on the immediate increase in the number of prospects wanting to contact a local dealer for a price quote within 20 minutes of each ad airing. With over 1 million prospects on Super Bowl Sunday, the results present the most comprehensive assessment of lower funnel demand for models advertised during the Kick-Off Show and Game.

Each commercial is ranked by the percentage increase in prospects in the 20 minute window after the ad aired, compared to a one hour window before the ad aired. Also shown is each model's share of the total increase in prospects during the Kick-Off Show and Game.

The Lincoln MKZ commercial succeeded in capturing the highest increase in prospects, at almost 5,800 share of all incremental prospects generated for individual models during the entire game, a major boost for a brand in the process of being reinvented. This was followed by the Audi S8 with a 1,391, followed by Kia Forte at 394.

Hyundai's three Santa Fe ads combined to capture 12% of all incremental prospects. Toyota's RAV4 and Hyundai's Sonata ads saw modest increases, possibly due to the early release of the ad, prior to the Game.

Autometrics will be updating its website with additional results throughout the week ahead, including pre, half-time and post-game commercials, a comparison of new vehicle brand ads from Audi, Jeep, Lincoln, Mercedes-Benz, Ram, Subaru, Toyota and Volkswagen and an analysis of the sustainability of any uplift in demand for the models above. Visit autometrics.com for further updates.


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  • 25 Comments
      willied
      • 1 Year Ago
      That GoDaddy commercial was just nasty.
      Drakkon
      • 1 Year Ago
      Clearly the best commercial of the night was the Jack in the Box Hot Mess commercial.... and THAT is how i met your mother. For an automotive connection, someone holds up a WISSOURI license plate with HOT ME55 and the motto \'SHOW STATE\' It\'s my states old red and white and they left the the ME in SHOW ME STATE. Great foreshadowing.
      throwback
      • 1 Year Ago
      I would love to see some analysis (if possible) of wether or not the superbowl ads lead to actual sales. At the end of the day isn't that what really matters?
      MikeInNC
      • 1 Year Ago
      As for car commercials (ahem..and staying out of the negativity), I thought the Audi commercial was the most enjoyable. Non-car...I thought the Doritos-cross-dressing dad spot was hysterical.
      Andre Neves
      • 1 Year Ago
      Another one of these articles? Can we stop already?
      Alexi
      • 1 Year Ago
      The Ram/Jeep commercials were a little insulting. While it was a nice tribute to America's warriors and farmers, it felt a bit false coming from the only foriegn owned among the big 3. I can't be the only one who felt like they were overcompensating
        ChrisH
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Alexi
        How? Chrysler while foreign owned isn't really a foreign car company. They started here, they build cars here, and many of their workers are here both blue and white collar. How can they be part of the big three anymore if you claim they are foreign? Look, you want insult, then ask why the other two didn't run such an ad. Chrysler is running very good superbowl ads because they do not specifically call out product, they tell you something about us and/or they make us smile. Seems to me that of the two big car makers here who both needed government loans to survive that Chrysler is doing much better recovering and being American.
          Alexi
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ChrisH
          The fact that GM and Ford chose to advertise vehicles instead of propaganda is far from insulting.
          Hoosyourdaddyo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ChrisH
          Two Carmakers? Check the facts...according to Forbes Magazine: "Ford Motor owes the government $5.9 billion it borrowed in June 2009, the same month GM filed for bankruptcy. By Sept. 15, Ford needs to start paying that money back." So GM and Chrysler paid their bailouts off in full, yet Ford hasn't.
      M-M
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's funny because on the radio you keep hearing people talk about the "Farmer Commercial", not the Dodge or Ram commercial, but the farmer commercial. That right there tells you it was a marketing failure.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @M-M
        [blocked]
      Brandobean
      • 1 Year Ago
      Am I the only one that thought the Audi commercial was downright offensive!? Here's a guy that walks right up to a woman at the prom and nonconsensually sexually assaults her. Then the commercial protrays that she "wants it" by going home with him. It celebrates his "bravery" despite his creepy rapey tendencies. Seriously,an entire league of woman I knew were so creeped out by that ad they were telling me to boycott that car brand (I'm looking for a new car right now)..I'm tempted agree. Between that and the less-offensive but equally sex-negagive "space babies" ad which encourages parents to lie to theor children about sex (funny, i realize that awkward conversation is "a thing" but those lies are actually a societal problem with unwanted pregnancy and probably sexual shame and poor comminication leading to...the Audi commercial) I thought those two could do better. Im not even that "political" about commercials. But those two were pretty egregious.
        Basil Exposition
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Brandobean
        Going home with him? What commercial are you watching? The one I saw showed a weenie-type kid who couldn't get a date to the prom going alone, getting his ass kicked, then going home alone. I guess they are trying to say you can make up for your social shortcomings by buying an Audi?
      shelvis68comebak
      • 1 Year Ago
      Agreed. When the editor and chief spews such vitrol about American cars but doesn't even live in the USA you have to question the site's integrity. Once you find out that he is a former VW ad exec and living in Japan and China consulting for competitors, you have to question where that site's paychecks come from.
      Chris
      • 1 Year Ago
      I don't care where your loyalties lie, or what your views are as one must admit that Chrysler has it going on with the Super Bowl ads. Even as one who cares a lot more about the game than the commercials, I still found myself being on the lookout for the big Chrysler ad that pulls at your heartstrings. Needless to say, I didn't feel let down by the Jeep ad. It was by far the most powerful commercial of the night, just like the ones from the last couple of years. With that said, I also appreciated some of the more light hearted ones, like the VW ad, as well as the Audi and Hyundai ones. Those 4 are the ones that stick out in my memory.
      rmt_1
      • 1 Year Ago
      With all due respect to Mr. Luntz of CBS, he completely missed the underlying truth about the "Farmer" ad when he claimed it to be a failure; the true target of the ad was men (and women) who already own a Ford or GM truck (or trucks) and make them see Ram as a viable alternate to those brands when they are in the market to buy a new truck. Increasing market share in this highly profitable area is the ultimate goal of this ad. So what if the ad doesn't appeal to those too young to know who Paul Harvey was, they don't have the money to buy a truck, let alone a fleet of trucks for a business.
        Pj Taintz
        • 1 Year Ago
        @rmt_1
        The fact that he called this ad a failure when it was clearly the best card ad in the game tells me all i need to know about luntz. and that is he isnt lutz. Clearly he has an agenda by calling the best commercial of the night, not by my standards but by many others in the industry bad. so just like other douches, fuhq him
      Healthy Chap
      • 1 Year Ago
      Does anyone really give a ****?
        Hal20xx
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Healthy Chap
        At $13 million a pop, yeah... they do. There's a bigger world out there. Try opening your door.
        Healthy Chap
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Healthy Chap
        Super Bowl ads stopped being relevant a while ago, honestly.
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