The Detroit News reports Ford is having real trouble moving its new Focus Electric. As a result, the automaker is offering substantial incentives in an attempt to lure in more buyers. How substantial? Try $10,750 off of a three-year lease. What's more, the EV can now be had for $37,995 ($2,000 less than its original base price) on top of an additional $2,000 cash discount to buy the EV outright – or you can opt for 1.9-percent financing if you work through Ford Motor Credit. None of which factors in various potential government incentives. Last year, Ford managed to sell a paltry 685 of the 1,627 Focus EV hatchbacks it built.

Ford isn't alone in trying to woo more buyers to its EV effort. Nissan cut the price of its Leaf by a whopping 18 percent for 2013, now down to $28,800 and built in the USA. The move followed the automaker's substantial incentives in 2012.

If you want a Focus Electric, you can now apparently get your hands on one for as little as $285 per month with $930 due at signing for a 36-month lease with 10,500 miles per year.


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  • 192 Comments
      Snark McGee
      • 1 Year Ago
      consumer reports declared it the most fun EV they have tested thus far. (that probably won't last as they just bought a tesla)... the battery taking up space in the back sucks.
      purrpullberra
      • 1 Year Ago
      This was never a very important car to Ford. They'd just like to lose as little money as possible while they learn how to do EV's well. They didn't engineer any of the FFE but the others, hybrids, are all in house designs and are better to learn from now.
      Cody
      • 1 Year Ago
      if automakers would actually ADVERTISE their EV offering instead of ignoring them, more people would atleast show interest in it. This is part of the reason the EV-1 from GM failed: no one knew about it other than a handful of people.
        Cody
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Cody
        this is why the Prius is so popular, Toyota advertises it quite a bit
          rmkensington
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Cody
          The prius is a useful car that you can drive all day long, thats why it sells. Electrics are going to be a fad until they start getting more miles per charge.
          recharged95
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Cody
          Thinking about, that all they did (advertise the Prius... from ads to product placement) from 2009-2011 until the Camry unintended accel press-debacle cleared.
          Michael
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Cody
          mk, Miles per charge isn't the biggest hurdle EVs have to get over to reach a larger audience. The 2 main factors in my opinion are: #1 - charging infrastructure #2 - public education on the cost of ownership (while an EV may cost more upfront, does it cost more over a 5 year period, will the resale value be higher than that of an ICE, etc.)
      merlot066
      • 1 Year Ago
      The Focus EV isn't the cornerstone of Ford's alternative powertrain lineup. The Leaf is for Nissan. The numbers tell it all. Ford only built 1600 BEV Focuses last year, Nissan sold 1400 Leafs in December alone. Ford is aggressively producing and advretising the Fusion Hybrid and C-Max and Nissan is aggressively producing and marketing the Leaf. They had a major tv-marketing campaign (taking a stab at the Volt for needing gas) and I remember seeing dozens of advretisements in car magazines (all expensive back page or double-page magazine ads) and online. I haven't seen a single advretisement anywhere for the Focus Electric. Ford is banking on Hybrids being big in the short-term, while Nissan doesn't make a single hybrid and is putting all their resources into the Leaf.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @merlot066
        [blocked]
        Dean Hammond
        • 1 Year Ago
        @merlot066
        Bingo.....full EV isnt a truly profitable proposition....hybrids and plug in hybrids are.....
      Danrar
      • 1 Year Ago
      You mean a vehicle sold in only a small subset of dealers, with no advertising, cheaper alternatives, some drawbacks and a fairly high price didn't sell well? Wow, didn't see that coming.
        raktmn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Danrar
        Don't forget dealerships that would rather use the Focus EV as a way to put the hard sell on you to buy a standard gas Focus, rather than to sell one of their EV's. I went in to one of our local Ford dealerships to ask when they thought they might get a Focus EV, or their new PHEV. The salesman told me it looked a lot like the gas Focus, and led me out into the lot to sit in a gas Focus. He then tried to get me to drive it and gave me the hard sell on gas mileage. He actually started bashing the Focus EV's range and space inside, which is when I finally realized I wasn't going to get any information about any Ford EV or PHEV and I thanked him and left.
      futuramautoblog
      • 1 Year Ago
      That's some smoking lease number. If I live at a place with accessible outlet, I'd certainly lease one and see how having an electric car for 3 years!
      Mike
      • 1 Year Ago
      One reason could be the color. This car is only available in a light blue, turquoise, silver, black and white. Not very exiting colors for a small car.
      Stumpy
      • 1 Year Ago
      I would love an EV as a Daily Driver someday. As my drive to work is under an hour round trip. That said, I think EVs are best for a person (or family) that has access to multiple cars. For me, M-F would be the EV. Then Sat/Sun would be out in my Miata. Best of both worlds.
      Spiffster
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wow, not a bad price IMO. Should have kept CO an intro market like they had originally planned and I may have bought one of these instead of a Volt. BTW, you can get a Volt for 4k under MSRP fairly easily. Both are very nice options depending on your needs.
      air8271
      • 1 Year Ago
      Something is wrong here. Why would the lease incentive be four times the cash incentive? Note that the Ford build-your-own site includes the $7500 federal tax credit in the calculations. Looks like the cash incentive does equal the lease incentive IF YOU INCLUDE THE FACT THAT THE CASH BUYER WOULD FILE FOR THE $7500 ON HIS OR HER OWN.
        raktmn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @air8271
        Yes, it does look like the lease numbers include the lease company passing on most or all of the $7500 federal tax credit on to the person leasing the car. This is how Volt and Leaf leases are so low.
      Dano
      • 1 Year Ago
      Making someone pay to beta test your product may work with operating systems and video games, but it isn't the best idea for a $40k car. Want to get your cars out there and at the same time move the technology forward?? 1) Offer 250 cars on a 1 year unlimited mileage lease for $99 a month in a drawing. Everyone who enters must meet certain criteria that covers you completely, IE insurance that will cover the car and more, have a garage, age limits, etc. 2) After 6 months if all cars are running well, scale up to 1000 cars for a 2 year lease, $199 a month, same criteria. 3) After 1 year collect all cars from first lease and tear them down. Find all problems, wear items, anything that will help advance the technology and use it on your current lease owners and future cars. 4) Continue with this until the price/technology has reached the point that most people can afford the car, and range has grown. If enough cars are on the road, range anxiety will take care of itself. Yes you will not make much money on the cars. But you aren't making anything now with people not buying them. Selling at a loss with incentives on perpetuates the issue since people start to expect those incentives in the future. All of the Big 3 are stuck in this cycle, have been for years. I am sure my suggestions are not perfect, but there are many people out there much smarter than me that could build on these ideas.
      John Switzer
      • 1 Year Ago
      Still early on in the technology, wait 10 years and see what is possible and/or available. They are coming, but will improve as designers and engineers sort out the problems. Cost will come down when the ability to increase production lowers unit costs. It's like battery design; who knows, in 10 or 15 years, batteries might be half their present size and have twice the charge. Time will tell.
        Generic
        • 1 Year Ago
        @John Switzer
        I agree, but just like a ICE, it needs to actually look attractive to sell and worth the asking price tag. They would also need to be advertised and pushed just like any other car that sells well.
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