Bits and Pieces



The asphyxiation-blue plastic of my dash looked like it would snap under a crass tone.

The line between cleverness and idiocy is a blurry one. After reading a number of write-ups on the best way to swap pedal boxes in a Fox Body Ford Mustang, I decided to eschew common wisdom and blaze a new trail of my own. Traditionally, putting three pedals where once there were two involves pulling the entirety of the ancient plastic dash from the vehicle in order to gain access to a few carefully hidden nuts and bolts. Undo some linkages, pull said hardware, reverse the process and voilà! You suddenly have a portion of the controls necessary to row your own gears.

It was pulling the dash on Project Ugly Horse that had me sweating. The asphyxiation-blue plastic of my dash looked like it would snap under a crass tone, so rather than go all hog wild with the ratchet, I took a closer look at the construction of both pedal boxes. From what I could spy with my little eyes, the swap could be accomplished with a little ingenuity, some sweat and a few well-placed curses. I busted out the grinder, set the welder to warm and got busy.
Fox Body Mustang manual pedal boxes

Every walkthrough I had read warned against pulling those bits apart with all of the seriousness of caution labels on a box of Ebola.

In reality, the two boxes are only differentiated by the presence of a metal tube that houses the clutch pedal shaft on manual transmission cars. There are two manual boxes pictured above, one with the clutch tube removed on the right and one with it in place on the left. I pulled the brake and clutch pedal from the donor box, ground off the flimsy welds that held the tube in place and installed the cannibalized pieces in the Mustang with my own flimsy welds. This process involved disassembling the plastic clutch quadrant on the right of the box. Every walkthrough I had read on the pedal box swap warned against pulling those bits apart with all of the seriousness of the caution labels on a box of Ebola, but since I planned to replace the brittle plastic with a shiny billet aluminum adjustable quadrant, I wasn't as worried about popping the spring-loaded nightmare apart.

With the pedals and aluminum quadrant in place, I routed a salvage clutch cable through the firewall via my new firewall cable adjuster and under the car, where I attached a set of junkyard linkages to the shift fork. That's when I noticed a problem with my set up. Had I read those Ebola warnings a little more closely, I would have noticed the OEM quadrant is crucial for keeping the clutch pedal taut against the cable. Without it, the pedal flops around like a despondent pool noodle, wandering up under the dash and generally being useless for changing gears. With a little head scratching, I worked up a system using one of the old springs to retain pressure on the cable and keep the pedal down where it should be.

Fox Body Mustang manual pedal conversion
Fox Body Mustang manual pedal conversionFox Body Mustang manual pedal conversion

That left me with just one missing piece of the puzzle: the shifter. You see, the T5 transmission had not come with a shifter of any variety, leaving me with a big hole in the trans tunnel and nothing to fill it with. Time for a confession: One of my motivating factors behind jumping into pony car waters was the chance to play with some of the storied brands from the American aftermarket scene. I'd grown up surrounded by names like Crane Cams, Moser Axles, Edelbrock, Holley, Moon and Hurst, but my personal automotive tastes had, for years, taken me far from the territories occupied by those companies.

I couldn't pass up the chance to lay my palm on a genuine Hurst cue ball.

With a set of Mustang keys in my pocket, that all changed. When it came to the shifter, there were plenty of short-throw options to be had, but I couldn't pass up the chance to lay my palm on a genuine Hurst cue ball. Blame it on years of prowling local auto shows and peeping through driver's side windows, eying the ivory-white of a four-on-the-floor and dreaming of first-to-second slams, so any other shifter simply wouldn't do.

On a whim, I reached out to Hurst to see if they wanted to be a part of the Ugly Horse build, and by what I can only attribute to a clerical error, they agreed to send over a Billet/Plus shifter for the T5. They bill the part as serving up reduced shifter throw as well as tricks like adjustable shift stops and a billet aluminum base. Of course, just about anything offers better feel and reduced throw over the old Ford parts. Gear selection in a stock GT of the Ugly Horse's era feels more like stirring a pot of half-done spaghetti with a bundle of pipe cleaners than knocking cogs.

Mustang Hurst Shifter
Mustang Hurst ShifterMustang Hurst ShifterMustang Hurst Shifter

When I can't sleep, I'll sit in the driver's seat and click from first through fifth.

Installation was incredibly simple with the interior out of the car, though since the chassis originally played host to an automatic gearbox, I had to trim the sheetmetal back a bit to make room for the taller manual shift base – something I would have had to do even with stock parts. Following the instructions, I torqued the four bolts down with the included gasket and I suddenly had one very nice bit of kit in the cabin.

The shifter sits at a nice height and is easy to reach from the steering wheel, but there's no calling the throws short. It's a lengthy jump from first to second gear or second to third. Fortunately, the stiff springs immediately snap the lever to neutral, and popping through gears serves up a satisfying metal *thunk* with each row. Sometimes, when I can't sleep, I'll sit in the driver's seat and click from first through fifth. It's magic, but I get strange looks from my wife. For $245.66, you can grab one for yourself here.

With the automatic transmission officially expunged from the car, I can turn my attention to more pressing matters like ditching the four-lug hubs and wimpy brakes for something with a little more bite. Stay tuned.

Project Ugly Horse is an ongoing series. Catch up by reading through the links below:

Part I
Part II
Part III


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 52 Comments
      EB110Americana
      • 1 Year Ago
      Zach, your Ugly Horse posts are awesome as ever! I wish they were longer and more frequent as they are a joy to read. Hopefully there will be many more of these even after the Mustang is complete and you move on to your next project.
      Mike F.
      • 1 Year Ago
      I love this series too. My only complaint is that the segments are posted so far apart. It'd be nice to get them maybe once a week.
      Brodz
      • 1 Year Ago
      Love Project Ugly Horse. I hope that AB has a project going continually, after this Zach.
      Riley C.
      • 1 Year Ago
      I can't wait to see the finished product! I sure hope you aren't keeping that tired 4 cylinder...
        Brodz
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Riley C.
        Of course he is. He can ring the neck out of it without braking the law. It's all about the usable horsepower.
      Classic_Engr
      • 1 Year Ago
      Nice write-up Zach. I will always have a soft spot in my heart for old Fox-body cars. I'm already looking forward to your next article.
      EvilTollMan
      • 1 Year Ago
      Good work so far man. I always get excited when I nee a new addition to the project ugly horse adventure. Good luck!
      Walt
      • 1 Year Ago
      Excellent work Zach! I hope you realize that being young means you'll dream about this project for the rest of your life, right? Experience talking here. I don't know how many times I've dreamed that my old Mercury Cougar GT was still in the garage. If only I could dream it in a better color than the "frog green" it was painted in back in the day. Loved the car, hated the color.
      F_Monk
      • 1 Year Ago
      Good stuff, as always. I can't remember if you're planning on keeping the original four-pot or planning an upgrade of some sort. No matter, projects like this are fun in a way completely specific to projects like this. When my beater '98 Mirage finally gives up the ghost, I'd love to do something similar to it. Something about the idea of racing a hopped-up beater compact sedan tickles me.
        Ryan Rogers
        • 1 Year Ago
        @F_Monk
        I used to autocross a '99 mirage. It was fun, but WWWWAAAAAYYYY underpowered! BTW---love these Ugly Horse write ups. Some good original content for Autoblog! I have no love for the fox body, but total respect for what you're doing! Keep it up!
      hellyenmtp
      • 1 Year Ago
      I got a 88 LX 5.0, with a Roush shifter aluminum ball, and I made the same mistake by not replacing the shifter quadrat and cable, when I installed the new cobra clutch.The pedal would just fall to the floor and I had to lift it with the tip of my foot when I wanted too shift the gears. LoL
      AnalogJesse
      • 1 Year Ago
      Really enjoying these pieces. More stuff like this, AB!
      AcidTonic
      • 1 Year Ago
      This site is so biased towards American cars it's sickening......
        adrenalnjunky
        • 1 Year Ago
        @AcidTonic
        Holy crap! AcidTonic made a post and didn't mention his Evo? This might be a first!
        LOLO
        • 1 Year Ago
        @AcidTonic
        go back 5 years in auto blog history and u wont find any of that. we are on the upswing with new cars and we love our old ones too. get uncomfortable get angry we are here and i hope we are here to stay.
        domingorobusto
        • 1 Year Ago
        @AcidTonic
        Good god man, can you really not appreciate an extremely well written story about a very interesting project just because it's an American car? Lighten up. There is more to life than the damn Evo. Broaden your horizons or shut the hell up.
        Classic_Engr
        • 1 Year Ago
        @AcidTonic
        @Acidic Tone: Lighten up, Francis.
        F_Monk
        • 1 Year Ago
        @AcidTonic
        Weirdo.
        Xedicon
        • 1 Year Ago
        @AcidTonic
        Jeez man it's his personal project that thankfully he's both willing and allowed to share with us here. Doesn't matter what he's wrenching on - just that he is.
        Zach Bowman
        • 1 Year Ago
        @AcidTonic
        Sorry you feel that way. I've owned vehicles from just about every corner of the spectrum, including an Acura, a Honda, a Subaru, a pair of BMW bruisers and a Kawasaki in addition to the domestics in the fleet. This is my first run at building a domestic. If this series goes well, we'll take on other projects. What would you like to see?
        bubba_roe
        • 1 Year Ago
        @AcidTonic
        @ Acid I completely agree. Its why I choose my screen name. I dont really come to this site for real car news, just entertainment. Pretty much they way you have to look at this site and others such as Truthaboutcars, Jalopnik, etc. Theyre all domestic fanboi sites.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        Zach Bowman
        • 1 Year Ago
        A 302? Now that would be boring...
          macutty
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Zach Bowman
          You can only complete that swap with an inexpensive kit from massengill.
          Xedicon
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Zach Bowman
          @Rob - But it's not your Fox body. What counts is that the project is being built - have to respect that. You're more than welcome to build "your own" Fox body however you want.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Zach Bowman
          [blocked]
        mycommentemail
        • 1 Year Ago
        Or... I dunno... you stop reading if it isn't up to your standards. K?
        Scotch Bingington
        • 1 Year Ago
        Rob, you've talked about it now, and it seems that nobody gives a ****. Whereas, lots of people like this build and are interested in it. "Project UGLY Horse" genius. It's supposed to be cheap and nasty. That's the fun.
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