Toyota Prius C
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  • Toyota Prius C

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  • Toyota Prius C
  • Toyota Prius C

  • Toyota Prius C
  • Toyota Prius C

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  • Toyota Prius C

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  • Toyota Prius C

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  • Toyota Prius C

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  • Toyota Prius C

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  • Toyota Prius C

  • Toyota Prius C
  • Toyota Prius C

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  • Toyota Prius C

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  • Toyota Prius C

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  • Toyota Prius C

  • Toyota Prius C
  • Toyota Prius C

  • Toyota Prius C
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  • Toyota Prius C

  • Toyota Prius C
  • Toyota Prius C

  • Toyota Prius C
  • Toyota Prius C

  • Toyota Prius C
  • Toyota Prius C

  • Toyota Prius C
  • Toyota Prius C

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  • Toyota Prius C
  • Toyota Prius C

Toyota can continue to be loved by the treehugger set, while Ford is making an appearance as Public Enemy #1 when it comes to going easy on the environment, according to the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) and its annual "greenest" and "meanest" list.

ACEEE named the Toyota Prius C the greenest vehicle, placing the compact hybrid just ahead of the Honda Fit Electric Vehicle and the standard Prius. The Prius Plug-in Hybrid and Honda Civic Hybrid rounded out the ACEEE top five. The Prius C gets a combined 50 miles per gallon.

Meanwhile, Ford swept the "top" three spots when it came to ACEEE's meanest list of vehicles that are least friendly to the environment. Specifically, Ford's F-350 FFV and F-250 FFV trucks, and the E-350 Wagon van were especially noteworthy for their environment-destroying ways, ACEEE said. Yes, these big vehicles were designed for different purposes than the fuel-sippers in the greenest list.

Last year's winner, the Mitsubishi i electric vehicle, failed to crack this years "greenest" list. Mitsubishi last year broke the eight-year stronghold of the Honda Civic Natural Gas on the ACEEE greenest list. Read ACEEE's press release below.
Show full PR text
Toyota Prius C Bests Several Electric Vehicles to Earn Top Spot

Washington, D.C.-With aggressive national fuel economy standards kicking in for model years 2012 to 2025, automakers have provided consumers with an impressive array of efficient vehicle options for 2013 according to new environmental automotive ratings released today. The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy's 15th annual comprehensive environmental ratings can be found at greenercars.org.

The "Greenest" list is dominated by new models this year, with the Toyota Prius C securing the top spot with a Green Score of 58. Having made its debut on the American vehicle market in 2012, the Prius C is Toyota's compact addition to the Prius family. The original Prius (#3), the new plug-in Prius hybrid (#4), and the larger Prius V (#11) all made the "Greenest" list this year as well.

Other top scorers are the Honda Fit electric vehicle (#2) and the Honda Civic Hybrid (#5). Three Ford vehicles made the list: the Focus EV and the Fusion and C-Max hybrids. European vehicles also placed, with VW's new Jetta hybrid and the Smart ForTwo placing #7 and #8.

This year, conventional vehicles were largely driven off the "Greenest" list by hybrid-electric, plug-in hybrid-electric, and all-electric vehicles. The Scion IQ and Smart ForTwo are the only non-hybrid, non-plug-in vehicles to remain on the list. Even the 8-time first-place Honda Civic Natural Gas vehicle was pushed out of the top twelve in 2013.

"The vehicles at the top of this year's rankings are proof that automakers are really ramping up their offerings. There are more hybrid and electric options on the market this year than ever before and the race for a spot on the Greenest list is increasingly competitive. Automakers have revamped their offerings to meet the growing demand for efficient vehicles and new fuel economy standards," said ACEEE lead vehicle analyst Shruti Vaidyanathan.

Greenercars.org provides the facts necessary to examine the eco-performance of any 2013 model. Vehicles are analyzed on the basis of a Green Score, a singular measure that incorporates unhealthy tailpipe emissions, fuel consumption, and emissions of gases that contribute to climate change.

This year, a number of updates were made to the methodology to more accurately estimate vehicles' environmental impacts. These include updates to emissions from the vehicle manufacturing process; changes to gasoline, diesel, and natural gas upstream emissions; and updates to the forecasted mix of fuels used to generate the electricity used to power electric cars.

The greenercars.org website also identifies widely-available, top models in each vehicle class. This "Greener Choices" list includes trucks and SUVs such as the Buick Encore, Chevrolet Equinox, Toyota Tacoma, and the Honda Odyssey. The Chevrolet Spark and Honda Fit top their respective car classes. As the list demonstrates, consumers can make "greener choices" whatever their vehicle needs may be. Domestic manufacturers claimed six of the twelve "Greener Choices" spots.

The "Meanest" list this year sees a number of heavier light-duty vehicles, pushing out European sports cars as the least friendly to the environment. The dirtiest vehicle for 2013 is the Ford F-350 FFV pickup truck with a Green Score of 17, followed by the Ford F-250 (FFV), and Ford E-350 wagon, both also scoring 17.

In addition to highlighting the year's "Greenest," "Meanest," "Greener Choices," and best-in-class lists, the greenercars.org website features informational write-ups on model year 2013 highlights, a consumer primer on vehicles and the environment, and advice on how to buy green when shopping for a new car or truck.

Summary Green Scores of the 1,000+ configurations of all model year 2013 vehicles are made available to subscribers of ACEEE's greenercars.org interactive database along with each configuration's fuel economy, health-related pollution impacts, and greenhouse gas emissions. Subscribers can also build custom lists for comparing vehicles. Monthly and annual subscriptions are available at greenercars.org.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 25 Comments
      me
      • 8 Months Ago
      cleaner than an all ev Tesla or Leaf whaaa?
      MTN RANGER
      • 8 Months Ago
      The Scion IQ and Smart FourTwo shouldn't even be on the list. The Volt gets better MPG (even without using any electricity!) than these micro cars. http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&id=31647&id=32172&id=32655
        BF4ALTF
        • 8 Months Ago
        @MTN RANGER
        I don't think this ranking is based entirely on mileage. For example, the Smart has been raked above cars that were rated with higher mileage. The Smart uses far less natural resources to make. I think they also look into production processes, and exhaust pollution. The Volt has been criticized on both these points. Knowing how some of you Volt fanbois are, so please note that I'm not a Volt hater. There is no need to be angry. I'm just pointing out the possible reasons why the Volt didn't make this list.
      Eideard
      • 8 Months Ago
      Ivory tower intellectual masturbation is as irrelevant as Tea Party ideology. And more boring when they produce crap like this to pat themselves on the back and pretend to be contributing to progress.
        Spec
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Eideard
        And your poo-poo message contributes to society how?
      Giza Plateau
      • 8 Months Ago
      How is a gas car greener than an electric? I don't quite follow that logic. Is it oil logic?
        2 wheeled menace
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        Easy. Consider the emissions involved in making electricity. Most of America's electricity is fossil fuel fired. The only exception is if you are running an EV off panels, nukes, or local hydro.. This car might run on gas, but it makes excellent use of the gasoline you put into it. These cars really do make a dent in our emissions and fuel consumption situation.
        usbseawolf2000
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        Fuel production is the key. Once you include the upstream emission, 50 MPG Prius is rated to emit 222 gram of CO2 per mile. Leaf is rated 230 g/mi. There is only one plugin that is rated lower than 50 MPG Prius. That plugin is the Prius PHV rated 210 g/mi. Those values are US average grid mix. You can go to EPA Beyond Tailpipe Emission site to check out the emission in your specific region by entering your zip code. http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=bt2
          Actionable Mango
          • 8 Months Ago
          @usbseawolf2000
          Spec, Did you include all the emissions from the electricity generated and used to refine the gasoline that is used to fire the electrical generators used to provide electricity? My head is starting to hurt.
          Spec
          • 8 Months Ago
          @usbseawolf2000
          But are you including all the emissions from the electricity generated and used to refine the gasoline? I doubt it. That tips the balance back to the electrics.
          Spec
          • 8 Months Ago
          @usbseawolf2000
          We do no generate electricity with gasoline. I'm sorry your head hurts because you are unable to understand these calculations. Can you provide a link showing the EPA includes the emissions from the creation of the gasoline?
          usbseawolf2000
          • 8 Months Ago
          @usbseawolf2000
          EPA does include all that. I am hust quoting their numbers. All the info are there only if you read.
      atc98092
      • 8 Months Ago
      Talk about comparing apples and oranges. At least stay in the same class of vehicle. There isn't a pickup on earth that can compare to a fuel sipping hybrid car. Yes, there's a couple of EV trucks, but they aren't for the mass market (yet).
        Actionable Mango
        • 8 Months Ago
        @atc98092
        Yes, full size pickups have a very different purpose. You might as well attack double-trailered semi-trucks for not having the same mileage as a Prius.
      AT
      • 8 Months Ago
      Who cares if it's green or not, go buy something that is within your budget, and that is essential for your daily needs/routines. After that, if it is green, great it's a plus, if not, wtf should care about your business. The funny things are people who buy trucks b/c they think it'll be needed when they move once or twice in their lifetime, or the smugness of hip environmentalists who thinks all non green machines are satanistic.
      • 8 Months Ago
      True trucks are an essential. However, many truck owners have little need for the payloads trucks offer. The UK auto shoe Top Gear in a review of the F-150 mentioned that the average owner hauls 2-3 grocery bags each week in the beds of their truck. Based on my neighbors this seems accurate. What is missing in the US is. Meaningful discussion on how on the vehicle you purchase impacts our efforts to achieve energy independence. We also need to consider the link between energy demand/price and other segments of our economy. Buying a truck versus a Prius C is an individual decesion. However, at a national level if the overal trend favors pickup trucks versus fuel efficent vehicles will impact policies at the national and international level.
      Terry Rhyne
      • 8 Months Ago
      Could it really be that the test were done only AFTER the vehicles were built. How green is the Prius when you consider the how, and what the car is made of. I have read that the batteries of the electric cars are actually pretty dirty, and they actually have a larger carbon foot print than the trucks.
      • 8 Months Ago
      This study is worthless for most plug ins because they use national grid averages, and the grid is MUCH cleaner in areas with high EV sales like California, New England, Oregon, Washington, etc. An EV on these grids performs much cleaner. Approximately 40% of EV owners also go solar, so they are driving on sunshine. Not an option with a gas guzzler like a Prius C.... When you look at lifecycle analysis for conventional cars, about 85%-90% of the energy/environmental impact is during the use phase - 15+ years of driving it, and only 10%-15% in the manufacturing. For an EV this changes because they use way less fuel and have higher manufacturing impact due to the batteries, but all in all this study would be much more accurate if they looked at regional electricity grids. The Union of Concerned Scientists did this and put out an excellent report that shows this, mostly focused on greenhouse gas emissions, but illustrative nonetheless http://www.ucsusa.org/clean_vehicles/smart-transportation-solutions/advanced-vehicle-technologies/electric-cars/emissions-and-charging-costs-electric-cars.html
      Johnny
      • 8 Months Ago
      What a joke. 350's generally function as the beds of service vehicles for police, emergency and fire departments. Would love to see a full sized ambulance based on a Prius frame. It would probably move about 5 feet before the engine exploded. Morons.
      Reggie
      • 8 Months Ago
      Gotta say l think 103 year old Detroit Electric Model D that had 100 mile range back in 1910 should make it onto the list, the only problem it will cost you £50,000 to buy. Rupert Banner, a car specialist at auctioneers Bonhams, said: 'Electric cars are all the rage now but Detroit Electric was doing very well with them 100 years ago. 100 mile range has not really been bettered 103 years later. 'The company became the most successful manufacturer of electric cars and this is a very early version of what they produced.They were very popular into the 1920s. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2262827/Detroit-Electric-Model-D-Abandoned-gas-guzzlers-amazing-103-year-old-electric-car.html#ixzz2IG7jiQ2M Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
        Actionable Mango
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Reggie
        Neat, but this wouldn't be considered a car today. With a top speed of 25mph and almost no features whatsoever, this is basically an electric golf cart with a 100 mile range.
      TPGIII
      • 8 Months Ago
      The Civic NGV was once top of this list. Now it doesn't get mentioned. Maybe the new one is not out yet and not considered. The Accord Hybrid should be on this list too, but it also is not for sale yet. Ford has two more with the same score as the C-Max hybrid that should be on the list as at least a tie, the MKZ and Fusion Hybrids. I suspect the Fiesta 1.0L EB could make this list next year. The Volt is not even mentioned, but clearly they are counting the energy source, which also may explain the Civic NGV with all the controversy over natural gas production. While I completely get and agree that the sources of electricity have different impacts on the environment, I wish they would give plug-in cars two ratings, one with typical energy source and one if you buy green energy.
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