2013 Scion FR-S
  • 2013 Scion FR-S
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  • 2013 Scion FR-S
  • 2013 Scion FR-S front 3/4 view

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  • 2013 Scion FR-S
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  • 2013 Scion FR-S
  • 2013 Scion FR-S engine

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  • 2013 Scion FR-S
  • 2013 Scion FR-S interior

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  • 2013 Scion FR-S
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Vital Stats

Engine:
2.0L Boxer-Four
Power:
200 HP / 151 LB-FT
Transmission:
6-Speed Manual
0-60 Time:
6.8 Seconds (est.)
Drivetrain:
Rear-Wheel Drive
Curb Weight:
2.0L Boxer-Four
Seating:
2+2
Cargo:
6.9 CU-FT
MPG:
22 City / 30 HWY
The New Poster Child For Cheap Thrills



Let me tell you about a man named Larry. Larry works for a company called STI Fleet Services, one of a few companies that are responsible for the cleaning, prepping, maintaining, scheduling, delivering and picking up of the cars we test on a weekly basis, not to mention a whole slew of other duties. STI and its competitors are the silent heroes of this whole automotive journalism biz. Larry is one of the guys responsible for a lot of the grunt work – he's been delivering cars to me for nearly seven years now, and because of that, we've developed a bit of a rapport. Now that I think about it, my history with Larry goes back farther than several of my friendships, as well as every romantic relationship I've ever had... combined.

With that much history behind us, Larry knows my taste in cars pretty well. And even though he doesn't voice his own opinions about what's being delivered to me, Larry silently knows when he's about to hand me keys to something truly special. When Larry arrived at my door with a bright red 2013 Scion FR-S, I tried to play it cool. But Larry knows me better than that.

"This is your car, man. It's all you."
Larry is right, too. I've been salivating over the Scion FR-S and its Subaru BRZ counterpart since the first set of spy shots landed in our inbox so many moons ago. And while a few of my coworkers had already driven these coupes in various locales (I am still so very jealous of Managing Editor Jeremy Korzeniewski and his Isle of Man rampage), this would be my first stint behind the wheel of the manual-equipped Toyobaru. (Full disclosure: I had already driven an automatic BRZ prior to this.)

2013 Scion FR-S side view2013 Scion FR-S front view2013 Scion FR-S rear view

I'll be honest, though. The FR-S isn't the one I'd have. Park it next to a Subaru BRZ and most people will have a hard time spotting all of the differences, but they're certainly there. And I notice. And for some reason – it could be the LEDs in the front fascia or even the subtle spoiler out back – the BRZ just turns the "want" factor up to 11 for me.

Its 11 inches shorter, an inch wider and 4.5 inches lower than a Honda Civic Coupe.

But that isn't to say the Scion isn't an attractive car. It's wonderful to see just how much of the original FR-S concept's design has carried over to the production model, including the sculpted front fascia with wheel arches that extend up beyond the relatively flat hood and the sloping roofline that flows into a clean, chopped off rear deck. No, the bold 20-inch wheels of the concept didn't carry over to the street-legal car, but the 17-inch rollers seen here do fill out the wheel wells enough to give the car an appropriately aggressive stance. The wheels themselves aren't particularly emotional or evocative in terms of design, but they're nice. And besides, that's what the aftermarket is for.

Overall size and proportions are where the FR-S gets really attractive, though. A lot of comparisons have slotted this car in with the Mazda MX-5 Miata and Hyundai Genesis Coupe, and in terms of its overall dimensions, the Scion is basically smack dab in the middle of the two. For another perspective, know that the FR-S is 11 inches shorter in length, an inch wider and 4.5 inches shorter in height than a Honda Civic Coupe. It's a short, squat little thing, and it's damn pretty.

2013 Scion FR-S headlight2013 Scion FR-S wheel2013 Scion FR-S badge2013 Scion FR-S taillight

That size comparison is a good way to describe interior dimensions as well. It's certainly not as cramped as a Miata, but a Genesis Coupe feels immensely more spacious by comparison. Taller passengers will certainly have a hard time getting comfortable in the Toyobaru – there isn't a ton of headroom, and even though the steering wheel does telescope some, you'll be doing your best Stretch Armstrong impression if you have to slide the seat back to accommodate longer legs.

Taller passengers will certainly have a hard time getting comfortable.

But for those of us not in the 90th percentile of height, the FR-S fits like a glove. Despite having a rather complicated audio control setup (wait and see just how long it takes you to adjust the bass/treble – seriously), the center console functions are very simply laid out and easy to use. It's all you need and nothing you don't – three dials to control the heating/cooling; simple stalks coming out of the steering column to manage your wipers, headlights and turn signals; and a center console free of any clutter except for a tall, well-positioned six-speed manual shifter front and center.

The cabin isn't uncomfortable, either. The front seats provide ample support, both in terms of overall butt-cushioning and lateral bolstering, and for two people, the interior is spacious enough that you won't want to kill each other on long trips. Those rear seats, however, are basically useless for anything resembling a human adult.

2013 Scion FR-S interior2013 Scion FR-S front seats2013 Scion FR-S gauges2013 Scion FR-S traction control button

Fine, though. The FR-S isn't a vehicle meant to coddle and soothe – it's a driver's car, first and foremost. Power comes from a 2.0-liter boxer four, sending 200 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque to the rear wheels via either the six-speed manual transmission you see here or an optional six-speed automatic. I've tried both applications, and while the auto is fine, I guess (don't do it), the manual is better. A lot better.

Any time spent mashing the throttle below 4,000 rpm is not time well spent.

Anyone who has spent time behind the wheel of a four-cylinder VTEC Honda or a Mazda MX-5 will know the FR-S' engine dynamics rather well. Basically, stop worrying about fuel economy (22 miles per gallon city and 30 highway, if you need to know) and just rev the hell out of the thing. This is a light car – only 2,758 pounds – but come on, 200 horsepower isn't exactly a ton of grunt. Aiding in off-the-line slowness is the fact that the full 151 pound-feet of twist doesn't come on until 6,400 rpm, so basically, any time spent mashing the throttle below 4,000 rpm is not time well spent. Downshift, and downshift often. Keep the revs high and you'll be happy. And so will the Scion.

Because of that need to shift frequently, you definitely want the manual transmission. It's clear that Subaru took the lead on development of the six-speed do-it-yourself tranny, as the shifting action feels closer to WRX STI levels of involvement than anything Toyota has ever put out. The transmission all works flawlessly with a nicely weighted clutch pedal that doesn't require a ton of travel and a gearbox that rips off crisp, notchy short shifts. Throttle response is equally good, with a linear power delivery and not a ton of juice flowing right at initial tip-in. It's all very engaging, and very, very well done.

2013 Scion FR-S engine

It may not use the strongest of engines, but if there's one thing I've learned throughout time, it's that tons of power does not necessarily a good car make. Yeah, a thousand horsepower is fun, but not if the car falls all over itself putting that force to the ground. And in the FR-S, chassis development was clearly priority Number One. Weight distribution rings in at a 53/47 front/rear split, and overall tuning was done to make the coupe involving and dynamic above all. Yes, that means ride comfort is compromised over rough pavement, but get some smooth tarmac with lots of twists and you won't care.

Overall tuning was done to make the coupe involving and dynamic above all.

MacPherson struts reside at the front and there's a double wishbone suspension setup at the rear, with stabilizer bars (18 millimeters in front, 14 millimeters out back) keeping things stiff. But the tuning done to this setup is what makes it shine – body roll simply doesn't exist and there's excellent feedback being delivered to the driver from all four corners. The stock Michelin Primacy HP summer tires are grippy enough while still letting you easily kick the tail out, but man, this thing grips.

Like so many other new products hitting the market, the FR-S uses electric power steering, and while we've had our reservations about this setup in a number of Toyota products, things are a-okay in the little Scion. The steering is direct and linear with a good weight on center, and from behind the wheel, you really don't get any of that wishy-washy false feeling that electric racks have been known for in the past (especially those associated with a Toyota badge).

2013 Scion FR-S rear 3/4 view

The FR-S isn't quite as perfectly balanced and flickable as a Miata, but it's really, really close. And that's still high praise. It is slow off the line, but so is the Mazda (the FR-S' 0-60 time of 6.8 seconds is three-tenths of a second quicker than Miata-san), but once it gets going, it's good.

You were right, Larry.

This thing absolutely wins the fun-per-dollar category.

All in, this 2013 FR-S stickered for $25,255 including $755 for destination, and aside from a choice of transmission and a few accessories, the car pretty much comes one way. If you want niceties like leather, keyless start and a prettier audio display, you'll have to option up for the BRZ Limited – $28,265 including destination. But as a starting point, the FR-S is a really sweet package. As far as rear-wheel-drive sports coupes go, this thing absolutely wins the fun-per-dollar category.

What's next? Turbo power. It's coming, and we've also heard reports of a convertible version joining the lineup, too. I'm all in favor of expanding this FR-S/BRZ lineup here in the States, and that forced-induction version is absolutely calling my name. The naturally aspirated 2013 FR-S is a honey, and if this is the sort of starting point we have to work with for a more powerful version down the road, I'm on the edge of my seat. But Larry already knows that.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 273 Comments
      domingorobusto
      • 2 Years Ago
      I test drove an FR-S a few months ago, and my impressions largely mirror those found here. The exterior is quite nice. I'm not sold on the tail, but I don't hate it either. All in all, it's a great looking little car. The interior is refreshingly simplistic. Everything is nicely laid out and comfortable. It definitely doesn't feel luxurious inside, but it also doesn't feel cheap. The seats are excellent. Nicely grippy and well bolstered, but plenty comfortable. The controls all fall very nicely to hand, and the shifter is perfectly placed. The pedals are nicely set up for heel-toe as well. There is ok headroom in the back for me at 5'11", but no space for legs. If you put an adult in the back, it will have to be behind the passenger and the trip better be VERY short, because both passengers will be horribly uncomfortable. The trunk is surprisingly large, and quite useable, with a decently sized opening. The handling is VERY good. Nicely controlled body roll, although I tend to like even a little more rear roll stiffness. Transitional behavior is very nice. The FRS is set up just a little tail happy, which is very nice. It's set to quite a nice balance of handling and ride quality. The ride is slightly stiff, but not at all uncomfortable. If there's any faults, it's that the ride height is quite tall and the stock tires are terrible. Some lowering is in order, and some tires that actually have something resembling grip. The brakes are decent. Pretty good feel and decent power. They aren't anything special though, and if it had more power it feels like they'd be inadequate. The engine is very nice in character, but underpowered. The thing is absolutely gutless. You MUST rev the hell out of it, even in everyday driving. You must treat it as a momentum car, because it's corner exit power is awful. And extra 100 lb-ft would be the best thing that could happen to this car.That being said, it likes to rev, it sounds great, and when you do rev it the power is....acceptable. The transmission is a treasure though. Nicely spaced gears, easy but positive shifter action, made if effortless to flick between gears without a single miss. All in all, a wonderful car in search of more power. If they give it bigger brakes, better tires, and 250 hp/torque, one of these will be in my driveway.
        Indubitably
        • 2 Years Ago
        @domingorobusto
        The brakes are fine -- the factory pads are the issue. Same with the tires. This is what most reviewers have sited about the car.
        wtrmlnjuc
        • 2 Years Ago
        @domingorobusto
        Fun fact: they're Prius tires.
      Patrick
      • 2 Years Ago
      A car is great when it accelerates quickly and has good handling. But any car that can be taken to its limits without needing an empty runway is even better because not everybody has that available. Cars like these are great fun and easily enjoyed. That's all.
      ZéMorales1445
      • 2 Years Ago
      If this car would be for sale in my country at a reasonable price (ha yeah right) I would love to buy it. Sadly there are not many RWD cars in good shape/good price/manual in the used market, and new RWD cars are out of my price range. A new MX5 comes at about 32k give or take, or a used 2007 at 15k but I am not a fan of convertible cars and I think I could adapt better with the space of the GT-86 than with the MX5. Sadly it might never come and so I must make do with something FWD... Coming from an 83 VW Bug I would not have any issue with 200 hp :)
      Rich M.
      • 2 Years Ago
      having driven the car on track the car does live up to the hype. yeah it could pull a little harder in 2nd and 3rd but its not slow as some posters make it out to be and posters whose probably never driven it or they drove it at a dealer where you’re lucky to go beyond 5/10th the cars limits. best thing about the the car is 3rd gear at 65-70mph during a quick left to right chicane, the rear yaws a little but not too much to the point that its about to break loose. ive driven 997 gt3 rs, cayman-s, boxster-s, to Z, S2000, RX8 and even an mx5, and they don't feel like this car. people will say for $25k there's no other car like it, i would say for double or triple the price there's no other car that feels like it. the only car that comes close in dynamics is the elise but FRS is an everyday livable car not weekend track car. also, there are cars before you drive it you know its going to be great, you just know by looking at it and that’s the frs. the first thing you notice when you see it person is how low the car is even with other sports-y cars around it. then when you sit in it, its a proper sports car where the seats and rails is almost leveled with the front and rear axles which is becoming rare not just in cars but modern day sports cars. the tiller is perfect in size not too thick and not too small in diameter, and there's no additional buttons that you can accidently press while aggressively driving. the shifter action could be better but not by much. its better than 90% of the manuals out there, its not snick-snick like mx5, or rubbery like a porsche, or resistant like a Z, or smooth like the S2000. in fact it doesn't feel like any of the cars mentioned, its positive, upshifts are quick to slide into the gates, although downshifts during aggressive driving from 3rd to 2nd even with heel toeing will occasionally find the gates vs. the slot. the best manual gearbox i think ever belonged to the S2000 and this gearbox is not like that, but i'm going to assume this will be stronger and less susceptible to 2nd gear grinds. here’s the thing with the car. If you haven’t driven it you can’t say anything about how it drives. i think power wise it will be enough for 80% of the people that will own it. Also it’s a momentum car, if you don’t like working to get up to speed then this isn’t the car for you. MX5, RX8, S2K, Boxster and Cayman owners will know what I mean by this. It’s a great car when a car like this is needed but you have to truly drive it to know what all the reviewers are talking about.
      capn233
      • 2 Years Ago
      "I wish I could quit you, Larry." I think that is an actual quote from the above.
      MikeInNC
      • 2 Years Ago
      I have to admit. I really didn't want to like this car. I've always preferred European styling and interiors so, I have absolutely zero affection for Subaru or Toyota. I did think it looked decent in pics but I spotted one on the road the other day and I have to admit. It's a pretty nice looking machine in person. Sure, it's got a little bit of 'boy racer' going on inside the car but I think that's acceptable. I can't vouch for the feel of it but it looks decent. Really, quite a nice bit of execution. I'd prefer another 50 horses but there is a difference between a fast car and a car you can drive fast. I prefer the latter and this fits. Not bad, not bad at all.
      sundell131313
      • 2 Years Ago
      It seems a lot of people on here dont know how the car business works. you come out with your car, get the early adopters to buy it, leave a few things out on purpose, and then 2 years or so add in the things its missing (in this case, a turbo) and voila! you get more customers to buy it. thats business 101.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @sundell131313
        [blocked]
          Drakkon
          • 2 Years Ago
          ..The Samsung commercial of the people standing in line. "when you you think we'll get the tap thing?" 'Next time. Definately next time."
        Donny Hoover
        • 2 Years Ago
        @sundell131313
        Yes, this brilliant marketing strategy was successfully employed for the retro redesigns of the Camaro and Mustang, selling only the v6 models for a few years. Oh wait...
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Donny Hoover
          [blocked]
        • 2 Years Ago
        @sundell131313
        [blocked]
      Huy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Please put better tires on this. http://www.roadandtrack.com/special-reports/scion-fr-s-tire-transformation
      FuelToTheFire
      • 2 Years Ago
      It gets my blood boiling how this car is so overpriced and overhyped. It has been proven again and again that today's ideal sportscar = AWD and turbo. This thing has absolutely no horsepower nor torque. Sure, it can handle, but what fun is there to a corner if there is no speed involved? This car was supposed to kill every mid-range compaact sports car out there, like the WRX, MS3, and Focus ST. It can't even keep up with the Civic Si. No real car enthusiast would buy this, especially with all the great choices out there which kill this thing in performance. The only people who would buy this are ricer boys and posers. For a lower price, a WRX kills this. A real, Torsen based AWD system, a 0-60 of 4.7 vs 7.4, much better handling, more practical, won't feel gutless . The list goes on and on. In before all the ricer boy fanboys who traded their fart can Civic in for this car start downvoting me.
        F_Monk
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FuelToTheFire
        All this depends on what one values in a car. Despite your assertion towards being a "real car enthusiast", you're not. Nor really. It's your way or not all. See, some us prefer to actually drive a car, rather than letting AWD make our task easier. What you don't get about cars like the FRS/BRZ, Miata and many other rear wheel drive machines is that you can carry major speed into corners (and through them, and out of them). You just need to know how to drive. Cars like this reward driver ability, rather than compensate for a lack of it.
        CHDTW
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FuelToTheFire
        haha stop trolling dude! How bored are you that you go to comment and prove your "superior car knowledge" on a page where obviously people who like this car are going to read?? I guess you know more than- Top Gear UK Top Gear Australia Road & Track Car & Driver Consumer Reports Motor Trend Autoweek Autocar South African Guild of Motoring Journalists US News Auto Express News Limited/Carsguide Wards Carsales Australia Scottish Car of the Year
        foxtrot685
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FuelToTheFire
        "This thing has absolutely no horsepower nor torque. Sure, it can handle, but what fun is there to a corner if there is no speed involved?" You've obviously never driven this car or any other lightweight sports car that doesn't make a whole lot of power. The beauty of them is that usually because they are so much better balanced they have greater handling dynamics... if you know anything about driving, the better the dynamics and that awesome balanced chassis allows you to brake later and carry great speed thru turns. Keep the engine on the north east side of the tachometer (or in this case, the north west) and youll have plenty of power to sling shot you to the next apex. Since theres less weight to carry, it won't take the car long to get back up to speed. You have to remember, this isnt a drag racer, and things are different once you get moving. I know paper racers like yourself like to quote 0-60 times but thats not what this car, the Miata, the RX-8, the MR2, nor the original AE-86 are about. "No real car enthusiast would buy this, especially with all the great choices out there which kill this thing in performance. The only people who would buy this are ricer boys and posers." Quite the contrary. Real car enthusiasts buy cars like these because of something that most cars of today lack... AN EMOTIONAL CONNECTION BETWEEN MAN, ROAD, AND MACHINE. All the cars listed are great, but that makes the FR-S no less fun to drive in its own right. People like you go out and buy all of the cars you listed because you are paper racers. You have to have the most HP and the fastes 0-60 times on paper so you can go to car shows and brag about how fast your car is to other paper racers that have the same cars listed. Nevermind that you've never taken the car to a track, and almost never autocross it. Real car enthusiasts could care less about this information and appreciate what the car brings to the table, especially the DRIVE... especially at autocross events and open track days. You sir, are a horsepower/ 0-60MPH time enthusiast, not a car enthusiast. :)
        m_2012
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FuelToTheFire
        twins are 6.8 (7.4 is auto) 0-60. STi is, what, $15K more than this car- not hardly cross shopping category. It sure has stomped enough cars in comparos.
        jason32379
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FuelToTheFire
        It sounds like you're in your own fanboy club. The one called "n00bdrivers"
        G
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FuelToTheFire
        there are people that are not ricer boy fan boys i hope you know who buy just because they like
        carguy1701
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FuelToTheFire
        Oh look, a moron.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FuelToTheFire
        [blocked]
        Donny Hoover
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FuelToTheFire
        Why do you have to spew this noise every few weeks on here? AWD = more weight turbos/intercoolers/other piping = more weight more weight = fail I can think of one successful tarmac racecar ever that has been AWD, and the newest street version of it, although great car and a performance bargain always ends up a little worse handling and a little slower around a track than the RWD exotics it competes against. We both know which car I'm talking about here. You know, that twin turbo'd thing. I think it is named after a lizard or something like that. So, if you're magic configuration is so great, perhaps you can explain to me how it loses on a track not only to similarly powered RWD exotics but to a Z06 carbon that has a significant power disadvantage against it. Then explain to me why F1, who represents the pinnacle of racing technology, is not using AWD.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Donny Hoover
          [blocked]
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Donny Hoover
          [blocked]
          Donny Hoover
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Donny Hoover
          F#%k off. Quit trolling all my posts, you loser. You're a toyaburu fanboy and you don't like me criticizing the lack of one with more power. We get it. Look at anything performance oriented. The fastest production car on the ring and every other track is not AWD. If you're not on dirt, AWD is too much added weight to be the best choice. Maybe one day it won't be. Who knows. Still, get off my back, or if I say something wrong at least correct it politely. Or would you prefer to align yourself with somebody that currently has 29 thumbs downs and continue to spew insults like a tard?
          Donny Hoover
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Donny Hoover
          Yeah, I'm a toolbag because I said it is foolish for Subaru/Toyota to have given no hint of intent to add forced induction to this car after being released almost a year ago. I'm entitled to my opinion, which a lot of people happen to share and it would be nice if people like you didn't fly off the handle about it. I'll remind you, this is an article about the Toyaburu, not the various regulations of F1. Then you go through and troll all of my posts, making idiotic points like that bit about the ATS-V. That's the mark of a sociopath and a troll, one which I won't waste any more time with. Maybe next year, when you're 16, daddy will give you the keys to the SVX and you'll mellow out a bit.
        Drakkon
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FuelToTheFire
        I would minus this post more than once if I could.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        jtav2002
        • 2 Years Ago
        So, you mention the handling sucks, then suggest 3 FWD cars that would be better? LOL. The FR-S would run circles around this car on the twisties. Sure, are those other cars faster in a straight line? Yes. Everything isn't about drag racing though (shocking, I know. We'll let you digest that for a bit).
          • 2 Years Ago
          @jtav2002
          [blocked]
          domingorobusto
          • 2 Years Ago
          @jtav2002
          Having driven both an FR-S and Focus ST in anger, the Focus does handle just as well or better (not counting differences inherent to the difference in drivetrain layout). A lot of that is tire, but it's kind of stunning how fun the ST is and how good the handling is. The ST really would simply walk away from the FRS, even in the twisties, as the handling is of a very similar level, and the Focus is MUCH more powerful and has better tires. If you can live with a FWD (I can't), the Focus is a much faster and almost as fun car for the same or less money.
          Frisky_Dingo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @jtav2002
          The ST doesn't handle as well as the FR-S. Almost, but not quite. It is amazing for a fwd car, though. And I don't see it just 'walking away' from an FR-S. Not with the torque steer, and fade-prone brakes. The lack of LSD really hurts the ST. And better tires would put the FR-S on an equal footing in terms of outright numbers in comparison to the ST.
        miketim1
        • 2 Years Ago
        This car looks way better then those and im sure it will be more reliable also. To add to that the Scion will have a much bigger aftermarket enhance then car more then the Ford, GTI and Cooper. Plus you have that handling of a RWD over a FWD.
        Justin Campanale
        • 2 Years Ago
        Do you really think a torque-steering Focus ST handles better than this thing?
          Huy
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Justin Campanale
          Yes. Not because it handles poorly, but because Toyota and Subaru decided to give it crappy tires.
        superchan7
        • 2 Years Ago
        People tend not to cross-shop sports coupes with hatchbacks. It's a trade of practicality. For example, I can appreciate sports sedans/wagons/hatchbacks, but I sacrificed the space and comfort and bought a 2-seater sports car that costs more AND hauls less.
      FierySolstice
      • 2 Years Ago
      How can the Japanese car companies get away with blatant rebadging, but the American car companies can not? The Subaru BRZ is the same exact car!
        John
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FierySolstice
        It's not a "rebadge." They co-developed the car, so they each get one, and decided to not to spend tons (and increase the prices) by making huge sheetmetal alterations. If Toyota did all of it and handed one to Subaru to sell also, that would be a rebadge.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @John
          [blocked]
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FierySolstice
        [blocked]
        RA
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FierySolstice
        you must be new to the car world
        Chris Bangle
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FierySolstice
        This car isn't a rebadge. It was jointly developed by two different companies that both took a version of it. That's a big difference from GM making 3 different versions of the same car that it engineered itself and slapping different badges on it... or taking someone else's car and putting its own badges on it.
        telm12345
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FierySolstice
        I would call it a "co-badge" not a "rebadge."
        truewhiteboy
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FierySolstice
        I've wondered the same thing. I think in this case it was a weird agreement where Toyota was going to sell it worldwide, but Subaru had the NA market. Not sure what happened to that. Seems both (for now) are selling well. Maybe we'll see more variation as the performance versions get released?
          • 2 Years Ago
          @truewhiteboy
          [blocked]
        A_Guy
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FierySolstice
        It is a valid argument and yet it oddly doesn't bother me. I think that means you have a point!
        Ben Lee
        • 2 Years Ago
        @FierySolstice
        It isnt anything new but its a legit question. Maybe Honda/ Toyota will get together and put out one car and they can each name it Accord and Camry. Ford/Chevy with the Mustang/Camaro. etc... Saving money!
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        Random
        • 2 Years Ago
        You are only as young as your heart.
        domingorobusto
        • 2 Years Ago
        By the sales numbers, Scion has so far been primarily a brand for 60+ seniors who need a small, affordable, and practical car. And why worry about brand stigma? Who cares as long as you're happy with what you drive?
          clquake
          • 2 Years Ago
          @domingorobusto
          There are only two makes that are like suits - Bentley & Rolls Royce. Other than those two, just buy what makes you happy.
          telm12345
          • 2 Years Ago
          @domingorobusto
          @Juan - If you think of cars as suits - you're missing the point.
          m_2012
          • 2 Years Ago
          @domingorobusto
          @juanb60 - you don't get out much, do you? This car is far from basic transportation.
          m_2012
          • 2 Years Ago
          @domingorobusto
          I have one and I fit none of your demographics. I am not 60+, and I did not need a small, affordable, or practical car. Anyone who has anything negative to say about this car just hasn't driven one. Drive one and come back here and post something worthwhile. Its a Subaru with an admittedly stupid badge. But that is just a piece of plastic. Its not like they share some parts and not others, they are the SAME car with a few details changed for cost savings. Can it use more torque? Sure. Can any car use more torque? Sure. The fact that these cars are holding up to lots of boost with no mods says that Subaru was prepared for such.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @domingorobusto
          [blocked]
        404 not found
        • 2 Years Ago
        I didn't know grown men were insecure about their image.
          NightFlight
          • 2 Years Ago
          @404 not found
          I never understood that either. Drive what makes YOU happy, who gives a flying F what others think. You have to like it, not them.
        tump
        • 2 Years Ago
        Somebody has a smallll peeeenis problem.
        capn233
        • 2 Years Ago
        You could always get the BRZ.
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