Let the dashcam navel-gazing continue. As the story goes, Australia's National Film and Sound Archive dug up some camera footage in 2008 originally thought to hail from Hobart, Australia. A closer look revealed the images were actually of Vancouver, Canada. In 1907, Seattle filmmaker William Harbeck took his hand-cranked camera aboard one of the city's streetcars and began capturing life as viewed from the streets. The 106-year-old film shows bustling neighborhoods filled with pedestrians, stray dogs and men on bicycles all darting around town. The clip is an interesting glimpse at a life gone by, and predates the claimed oldest dashcam video we showed you before by an impressive 19 years (although obviously it's using a streetcar and not a conventional automobile).

Sadly, chronicler Harbeck met an untimely end. When he was 44 years old, he was commissioned to document the launch of a world-famous ocean liner, a ship that wound up on the bottom of the Atlantic. The name of the vessel? The Titanic. Take a look at Hartbeck's look at Vancouver below.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 140 Comments
      Audia McGee
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's really amazing. The film, people and buildings all from another time long gone. Wonder if I might looking at a distant relative or friends family from one hundred plus years ago. Guhtenno commented how nice everyone was dressed up back then. In one hundred more years I wonder what the future will say about OUR clothing or would it be lack of clothes in some cases? It's funny how some things in human history will never change like all the people rushing about. Some even strait out into traffic! I would like to see more old films please. Thanks for sharing this wonderful film with us today.
      Shep
      • 1 Year Ago
      The combination of walking, biking, and streetcars looks far more appealing than the car culture that has replaced it - and I'm a big-time car enthusiast.
        Alice
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Shep
        I am a Civil War reenactor of 16 years and for the last 7 years live in an old coal mine town in Pennsylvania. My g-g-grand moved there as a bride in 1900, so I can imagine the city of Philadelphia, let alone a small town like hers what it must have looked like! And yes, as a reenactor I could survive loss of phone, etc but know many, many who could not. And if that ever happened, we'd be sorely hurting.
        SAAj
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Shep
        Luckily, we can get the best of both worlds: America and Europe.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SAAj
          [blocked]
      seban
      • 1 Year Ago
      Amazing glimpse to a moment where all are now gone. What sort of jobs/industries were they employed in? NO phones, no cell phones or tv. Newspapers primary sources of information. GOOD MUSIC.
      paul
      • 1 Year Ago
      I love this
      Velocity105
      • 1 Year Ago
      Interesting footage, a lot like the electric trolley film from 2010 showing footage of it's travel down a main street in 1903 San Francisco 3 days before the Great Earthquake leveled the city. Enrico Caruso was singing at a nearby theater but left the city right before the earthquake. It would be interesting to be around in 2150 to 2200 assuming society is still here and see how many are watching television programs from the 20th century.
      John O'Toole
      • 1 Year Ago
      One year later the Cubs won their last World Series...
      ANTON
      • 1 Year Ago
      I am sure many people were hit by streetcars, you can see on this film how many get close to it crossing the tracks. Probably no J-walking laws back then because of the lack of cars so you crossed when you could, people just going about their day in 1907 just as we do today. 100 years from now people will look at today and wonder how we managed, just imagine this is just over 100 years ago, no airplanes flying overhead, no street lights and just a few cars if any. Look how far we have come in those 100 years, imagine how far we will be in another 100, I read that it took about 200 years to improve the bicycle with sprockets so you did not have one giant wheel and one smaller wheel and only 30 years from the first flight to passanger flights, and today we have computers to help us improve on things. The people in this film were facing a rough 40 years ahead of them, the stock market crash, two world wars, the depression, this is really the best time of their lives right here, you just never know what the future brings, we know now what they went through but they had no clue. Same with us, we are sitting here watching this and everything is okay but we could have a WW 3 or nuclear holocaust awaiting us or some kind of major earthquake or tsunami that may wipe out the east or west coast, these people could survive if they lost power and communication, we could not, if we lost our power, cell phones, computers, etc. for even one year I would say close to half of the population would not make it, we are too dependent on it. Without power no grocery stores, our food supply would be gone, it would be total chaos, I doubt that will happen but it could, we rely so much on power that we could not live without it today.
      Lane
      • 1 Year Ago
      You know what's weird, 99% of the people you see in this video are now dead.....!
      LadyGodiva
      • 1 Year Ago
      That was awesome...the music was perfect!
      dwaynestump
      • 1 Year Ago
      As a kid I can remember there being cobblestone streets and streetcar rails in Covington or Newport Ky. I'm not sure which city. It doesn't seem that long ago, but I guess it was.
        Pantino4
        • 1 Year Ago
        @dwaynestump
        Sir, No it wasn't. Plenty of us remember them and actively running.
      Scr
      • 1 Year Ago
      Amazing just how covered in **** the streets were back then. Gigantic steaming piles of it...everywhere! Thank god for all the progress where you only find that condition today in the Gaslamp District in San Diego from all the homeless dudes or around an 'Occupy' encampment.
        Carbon Fibre
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Scr
        Um progress? Corruption? Gov control? Bank control? Wireless power perfected in ancient Egypt only to be obliterated in existence by the government; courtesy Tesla? Dunno man....
      • 1 Year Ago
      One thing I notice from the 1903 London footage by Edison and the 1907 Vancouver footage is that there wasn't one overtly obese person in either films. Much different lifestyle, lots of physical movement and little, if any, processed foods.
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