Wave goodbye to the Audi A2, as the electric car concept first shown at the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show apparently won't be making it into production. Sources have told Britain's Autocar that the lightweight Audi vehicle – originally destined to compete against the BMW i3 and the new Mercedes-Benz A-Class – was a good engineering study, but today's lackluster global EV sales are at least partially to blame for its demise.

Like its production predecessor, the original A2, the four-door concept shown above was constructed mostly of aluminum. The Audi concept also incorporated carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer and other lightweight materials to minimize mass – the four-passenger hatchback weighed just over 2,500 pounds. The 2011 A2 concept was engineered with a "sandwich floor" construction not entirely dissimilar to that of the original A-Class. The construction method allowed the A2's lithium-ion battery pack to reside beneath the passenger compartment, while its 114 horsepower motor drove a single-speed transmission sending power to the front wheels. After a reasonably quick four-hour charge, it was expected to deliver a range of about 125 miles.

Had the program received the green light, the A2 was expected to be released in 2014 as both a pure EV and as a plug-in hybrid.


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  • 37 Comments
      ferps
      • 1 Year Ago
      First Audi cancelled the R8 e-tron and now this. It may be hard to make a business case right now, but I think VAG would be wise to develop and sell at least one pure electric vehicle to establish a foothold in the market. A unique model with a under-floor battery is the right approach (as Tesla has shown). Stuffing a bunch of batteries into an existing chassis isn't going to cut it for range or dynamics. All indications are that BMW is going ahead with the i3 and investing a lot of time and money into it. What's being done with the billions that VW promised to invest in Audi? Audi could end up playing catch-up, the way they did a decade ago with SUVs.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ferps
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          Val
          • 1 Year Ago
          The problem is that the dual-drive integration is difficult and very expensive to do well And you are saying that to a company that just spent 17 billion euros on the new golf platform... The company that is swimming in money... And what is so difficult? GM didn't actually invent some magical contraption, sure they patented a lot of stuff, that doesn't mean nobody else can do it. Volvo got a plugin hybrid on the road, and they are not exactly swimming in cash.
          • 1 Year Ago
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          Val
          • 1 Year Ago
          No, but it guarantees that they hava a lot of money to spend, which is one of your requirements. And they patented a certain way to do things, there are many other ways to do it. That is why toyota cannot sue GM over the volt, because GM was smart enough to change the linkage on one of the 4 planetary gears and add clutches. Otherwise their system is pretty much exactly the same as toyota's. Oh, and volvo did start production on a plug in hybrid that has nothing in common with the volt, as the electric motor is at the rear axle, so there is no need for a planetary gearset. Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV has electric, parallel and series hybrid modes, with twi motors, one per axle. So how did they manage to do that without the magical GM patents? Or maybe you have som info that shows mitsubishi paid GM for some patents? Let's not forget also the new Honda SH-AWD hybrid system, or the system in the porsche 918. All very similar, yet different from the volt.
      Smoking_dude
      • 1 Year Ago
      WHY? The old A2 is a seller today. It looks a bit boxy, bot Audi never tried to make a nice facelift. Germans love it. the A2 can do 250,000 miles without problems. Old Audi A2s have high resale values. Audi never understood or was willing to market it properly. I don't understand the strategy behind it. The A1 etron AXED. the R8 Etron AXED. several other etron protoypes AXED. Now the A2? But did anyone expect something different. I bet in the year 2015 VAG will not have a single EV (mass production) on the road.
      ojanusraziel
      • 1 Year Ago
      thats funny. i could swear that small regional availibilty, lack of production, and luxery uppricing was what was killing ev sales. how about a taking out all the infotainment/luxery bs and mass producing a better priced ev for the masses?
      audisp0rta4
      • 1 Year Ago
      Audi+EV Concept= CANCELLED Yup...that math checks out! :p
      loopless
      • 1 Year Ago
      Audi has a very clever A1 hybrid on the way to production in 2014, so I think this A2 did not make sense anymore.
        paulwesterberg
        • 1 Year Ago
        @loopless
        The A1 looks worse to me, and a recent article says they have no plans to build it either. http://www.wheels.ca/reviews/audi-a1-e-tron-the-best-hybrid-youll-never-drive/
      Legend
      • 1 Year Ago
      And VW is pouring 17 billion into audi to fight BMW...
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      Too bad, this is about the only audi I have ever considered buying. I bet that audi has also tossed plans for the e-tron city into the trash - content to allow the Twizy to own the medium speed electric vehicle market.
        Snark
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        Yes, they probably are content to allow Renault to own that spectacularly unprofitable market.
      • 1 Year Ago
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      Dingleberrypiez
      • 1 Year Ago
      Good call Audi, flush that brat turd down ze toilet. Then again, I could say the same about the rest of their products....
      Teleny411
      • 1 Year Ago
      This seems like a solid business decision.
      • 1 Year Ago
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        throwback
        • 1 Year Ago
        I suspect they are looking at BEV sales world wide and not seeing the sales. If BEVs aren't selling in Europe with their gas prices and government rebates, why would they sell in the USA? If the Leaf was selling as well as Ghosn expected, more companies would jump in. PHEV seem to have more sales potential.
          Actionable Mango
          • 1 Year Ago
          @throwback
          Yes, but they are cancelling the PHEV too.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @throwback
          [blocked]
      Andrew Richard Rose
      • 1 Year Ago
      They really just don't have the technical expertise the Germans , strange !
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Andrew Richard Rose
        [blocked]
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