2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

Ford may be clearly stating that it is not discussing any particular models with the Environmental Protection Agency as an official investigation continues, but that isn't stopping the people from filing a federal class action lawsuit against the automaker over mileage claims for the C-Max and Fusion Hybrid vehicles.

In August, Ford said the C-Max Hybrid gets a clean 47 miles per gallon in all three categories (city/highway/combined). The Fusion got the same grades. The lawsuit, which was filed earlier this month in US District Court in the Eastern District of California, claims that the marketing campaign Ford is using to promote the fuel economy for those two models is "false and misleading." Ford also used "misrepresentations and omissions" to promote the cars, says the claim.

What's interesting here – and in the Hyundai/Kia MPG situation – is that the EPA signs off on these numbers, even if the agency doesn't test the vehicles itself. Independent tests of the two cars, both by private citizens and Consumer Reports, showed that the vehicles aren't quite hitting those numbers (only getting around 37-39 mpg) in real-world situations. Just as Hyundai is reimbursing customers, the plaintiff in the case, Richard Pitkin from California, says he wants money from Ford, and that other owners should get some, too. The same law firm, McCuneWright, is the one suing Hyundai. Ford told Automotive News it cannot discuss pending litigation.

We'll let the lawsuit determine if Ford's ads are misleading. One thing no one can dispute is that they're working: C-Max sales broke hybrid launch records earlier this year.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 212 Comments
      BlackDynamiteOnline
      • 2 Years Ago
      A true cynic would say isn't it funny that things like this class-action lawsuit, and Toyota's Billion dollar settlement are buried in the media's coverage, after business hours, the day after Christmas, when the fewest eyes possible will be on these stories. How convenient for them. Maybe it's just a coincidence..... BD
      Reggie
      • 2 Years Ago
      Gotta say Ford C-Max made all those MPG numbers stated in the EPA tests, EPA has a set of parameters it uses to test cars which is not Consumer Reports way of testing them, which was also found to be true. Cant see why Consumer Reports needed to undermine the EPA tests, as you have gotta have some parameters by what you test cars with, you can bend the rules parameters to make a car as good or as bad as you want. Don't see that they will win the lawsuit, as every Tom, Dick & Harry only needs to drive around like Larry Leadfoot to prove he does not get the EPA MPG stated it would open the floodgates for claims, if Consumer Reports carried out their tests in the same way the EPA carried out their test they would have got the exact same MPG number
      • 2 Years Ago
      I am only getting 31 MPG Average http://fusionhybridmpg.blogspot.com/ in my 2013 FFH
      Tiberius1701
      • 2 Years Ago
      EPA mileage "estimates" are just that, estimates. YMMV... As a matter of fact, the EPA numbers are for the most part calculated without a vehicle ever being driven on normal roads. As an aside, every single Ford I have ever owned never achieved optimal fuel economy until about 4-5000 miles were rolled up.. My current car a 2011 Fiesta SEL with the Dual-Clutch six speed averages 33MPG in mostly city driving. One highway trip I clocked 43MPG driving between 65-70MPH. But this is my experience.
      BlackDynamiteOnline
      • 2 Years Ago
      Of course! They've only been following the tests on all of their cars for 20-25 years. I'm sure they've forgot how to do the tests. Why didn't I think of that? BD
      That Guy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wow, the Ford cheerleaders are out in force. Another thing to remember...one reviewer (NOT CR), was COACHED by a Ford employee on how to drive his C-Max...and STILL got well below what it was supposed to. Ford is being dishonest...yet again.
        Reggie
        • 1 Month Ago
        @That Guy
        Ford/EPA are both not being dishonest, Consumer Reports decided to use different driving style parameters to what the EPA uses to test cars. EPA MPG is easy to achieve, if you don't drive around like Larry Leadfoot, which l am sure is not the driving style of the average C-Max hybrid driver. Your not a Lawyer "That Guy", you are just a Ford backstabber it's pretty evident with every post you make whether its good or bad news about Ford, you are there with your knifes out to stick in the back of every Ford posting on Autoblog. Have you ever got anything positive to say?
          That Guy
          • 1 Month Ago
          @Reggie
          You obviously have an issue with reading and comprehension. This really isn't about CR at all. CR is one of MANY different sources factually stating that the mediocre Ford hybrids are not reaching what Ford is advertising. Even when Ford was coaching a CMAX owner on how to drive to acheive the advertised mileage, it didn't come anywhere close to 47. Ford is a disgraceful company and should be strung up for lying to people like they are. They know what they're doing.
      Brody
      • 2 Years Ago
      The C-max is heavy and is to fat around the midsection to get 47 mpg. I dont know why so many people defended. it.
        BlackDynamiteOnline
        • 1 Month Ago
        @Brody
        You mean a car that is 50+ HP more powerful, less aerodynamic, and 350 lbs heavier than a Prius V isn't 15% more fuel efficient? The hell you say! BD
      Dean Hammond
      • 1 Month Ago
      dare I say the biggest variable is the person behind the wheel, perhaps the dis-claimer should read, your mileage will vary BIG time...
      Dean Hammond
      • 1 Month Ago
      well you obviously dont.........want me to start listing....stop being an a$$...........theres PLENTY of cars with heavier curb weights, aero and power getting better mileage than paper weights, to use those parameters is totally ignorant, clueless and unseducated....but hey, its a witch-hunt so continue.....
      Dean Hammond
      • 1 Month Ago
      snicker...i see my voting down stalker is back at large....LMAO!
      Dean Hammond
      • 1 Month Ago
      now THAT I'll upvote....
      Jason Krumvieda
      • 2 Years Ago
      So this isn't that bad. Let's do the math...15,000 miles a year at 47 MPG= 319 gallons of gas @ $3.20= $1020 per year or $86 a month in gas. 15,000 a year at observed MPG of 41 = 365 Gallons @3.20 = $1167 or $97 a month. $11 a month for all of this. That is a pretty cheap problem to have.
        TomM
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jason Krumvieda
        you can't tell someone their problem is insignificant just because you worked out a scenario that shows an additional $11 per month in fuel costs. change a few numbers around and it makes a huge difference. gas will get back up into the $4+ range before long, factor in my actual 32mpg, and you get an additional $45 per month, $540 per year, $1620 over the life of the lease. so i think that is a very real issue. like i said in another comment, i fully expect the mpg i am seeing to climb as the car breaks in, but i do not think it will climb 15mpg.
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