• Dec 18th 2012 at 7:32PM
  • 7
EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association
  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association
  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association

  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association
  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association

  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association
  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association

  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association
  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association

  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association
  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association

  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association
  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association

  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association
  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association

  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association
  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association

  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association
  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association

  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association
  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association

  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association
  • EVEN - Icelandic Electric Vehicle Association

It's no secret that Gisli Gislason wants to bring electric vehicles to Iceland. A year-and-a-half ago, he struck a deal with Amp Electric Vehicles to send 1,000 EVs to the island nation. That won't happen now. He's also navigated a $39-million deal for 150 EVs, with similar results. Undeterred, Gislason's and his cohorts today founded the Icelandic EV Association. It's the latest move to make Iceland one of the most EV-ready countries in the world.

Gislason told AutoblogGreen that, "Since the EV revolution is just starting in Iceland, we have a unique opportunity to do things by the book – which we are writing." At the start of 2012, there were 11 electric vehicles in Iceland, Gislason said, along with just a few Level 1 charging stations. Today, there are "more than double" that many EVs in Iceland and proponents have started to set up Level 2 chargers, Gislason said. "Strangely, but fortunately, we are the only player on the market setting up the infrastructure. We are therefore trying to get everyone on board to set up one system that will be open for everyone to sell access to," he said.

"This will benefit the EV owners because they can choose which energy provider they want to subscribe to in the future and get access to all the charging poles and fast charging stations available. In Norway, there is a problem because the EV revolution started without control and EV owners have to subscribe to more than one company to be able to get access to enough charging stations to feel secure," he said.

If the Icelandic EV Association's plans work, Gislason said he expects to import about 300 EVs next year. His ever-enthusiastic spirit allows him to see this in a positive way. "Let the games begin," he said.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 7 Comments
      DaveMart
      • 2 Years Ago
      Plug in hybrids can use the engine's waste heat to keep warm. In Iceland's landscape that and the greater range would make me feel a lot safer than driving a BEV.
      • 2 Years Ago
      Thanks for fixing the page title, and the piece subject. ... The piece's topic of organizing and developing plugin (both EV & plugin-hybrid) vehicle use in Iceland is quite important. Iceland is perfect for plugin vehicles with an abundant amount of geothermal energy. The distances mostly driven are not that far, thus commutes and or shopping would be well within an EV's range. Later, when fund is available a series of well planed strategically located public level-3 EVSE would allow transversing any longer distances. I hope the gen2 versions of the most popular EVs, Leaf and iMiev will have better thermal pack management (warmers for cold areas, and cooling for hot areas) to maximize pack range and life. Though both of these EVs are really fine, the manufacturers went cheap on a few critical points. They knew better, but made fine EVs that are more suited to operate in temperate climates. Another point they went cheap on was the on-board charger (changes the AC to DC to recharge the battery pack). Instead of the cheaper 3kW on-board charger, they should installed or at least offer an option for drivers to buy a *full-powered 6kW on-board charger. With complaining (_itching) from U.S. east-coast fossil-fuel vested conservatives about plugins are coal burners, they could not use that point with Iceland's more-benign geothermal electricity. I wish Iceland well, and look for to more good-EV-news from Iceland plugin drivers. {brucedp.150m.com}
      Turbo Froggy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Looks like Nissan is already considering selling the Leaf in Iceland: http://www.nissan.is/rafbilar/leaf/leaf-42.html It would be a matter of convincing the local dealers to bring them in. Maybe Nissan should do a reservation $99 and judge the demand. I don't think it would be difficult to sell 350 of them.
      Ugo Sugo
      • 2 Years Ago
      You have to admire the relentless optimism (or recklessness) of such people in a bankrupt country as Iceland. Must be the sun!
      incompatible.quadrilateral
      Gislason is a tenacious man. I hope he succeeds this time.
      • 2 Years Ago
      Thanks for fixing the page title, and the piece subject. ... The piece's topic of organizing and developing plugin (both EV & plugin-hybrid) vehicle use in Iceland is quite important. Iceland is perfect for plugin vehicles with an abundant amount of geothermal energy. The distances mostly driven are not that far, thus commutes and or shopping would be well within an EV's range. Later, when fund is available a series of well planed strategically located public level-3 EVSE would allow transversing any longer distances. I hope the gen2 versions of the most popular EVs, Leaf and iMiev will have better thermal pack management (warmers for cold areas, and cooling for hot areas) to maximize pack range and life. Though both of these EVs are really fine, the manufacturers went cheap on a few critical points. They knew better, but made fine EVs that are more suited to operate in temperate climates. Another point they went cheap on was the on-board charger (changes the AC to DC to recharge the battery pack). Instead of the cheaper 3kW on-board charger, they should installed or at least offer an option for drivers to buy one. With complaining (_itching) from U.S. east-coast fossil-fuel vested conservatives about plugins are coal burners, they could not use that point with Iceland's more-benign geothermal electricity. I wish them well, and look for to more good-EV-news from Iceland plugin drivers. {brucedp.150m.com}
      • 2 Years Ago
      Typo found in page title, and the title of the piece. Assocition should be Association
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