Lexus has officially built the very last LFA. The 500th Lexus supercar rolled from the company's Motomachi facility on December 14th wearing all of the goodies of the Nürburgring package and white paint. Toyota's Lexus division started production on the car exactly two years ago on December 15, 2010 and built just one unit per working day. A total of 170 workers were hand-picked to handle parts manufacturing, assembly and painting for the LFA project. While Lexus has made it clear it will produce no more LFA models, lessons gleaned from the vehicle's construction may translate into other future products.

Specifically, Toyota says it may employ its carbon fiber reinforced plastic experience moving forward. As you may recall, the LFA made extensive use of CFRP and carbon fiber, and Lexus even created a special rotary loom to stitch together the supercar's A-pillars. Take a look at the brief press release on the last LFA below.
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500TH AND LAST LFA LEAVING THE PLANT

• Last LFA produced on December 14, 2012
• Learning from LFA engineering and production influencing new Lexus products
• In-house production of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) components for know-how gain to be used in future products


Brussels, Belgium -
On December 14, a white LFA Nürburgring Package, the last of the 500 planned LFA supercars, left TMC's dedicated production facility at the Motomachi Plant, Aichi Prefecture.

This marks the end of a key chapter for Lexus, one in which people's perceptions and understanding of the brand have been challenged, and perhaps changed forever.

The learning and passion gained from engineering and producing a world-class supercar can already be seen in the products recently launched by Lexus - across the whole range, not just those carrying the F Sport badge.

In that sense, the spirit of the LFA will live on; it will be fondly remembered for being the car that marked the start of significant change for the Lexus brand.

The development of the supercar started from a blank sheet of paper. CFRP was used for a significant percentage of the vehicle's components, taking benefit of the material's exceptional strength, rigidity and light weight to achieve a breakthrough in supercar manufacturing. CFRP production took place in-house in order to gain valuable know-how to be used in future products.

'I've lived and breathed supercars for the past decade. – remembers Haruhiko Tanahashi, the LFA's Chief Engineer. – Specifically one supercar. The LFA. Very few people have the opportunity we had: to create a world-class supercar from a blank sheet of paper.'

Production at LFA Works started exactly two years ago, on December 15, 2010, and included a team of around 170 hand-picked takumi workers involved in parts manufacturing, vehicle assembly and painting. The high performance LFA was produced at the rate of just one unit per day.


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  • 88 Comments
      adam1keith1980
      • 2 Years Ago
      This is one of those rare cars where money is no object, engineers can be engineers, and accountants be damned. The LFA is a glorious engineering exercise and fit nicely along with other once-in-a-lifetime cars such as the Honda/Acura NSX, Bugatti Veyron, and Volkswagen Phaeton. The project itself might not be profitable, but it is a wise long term investment. Because of the LFA, Lexus has “street cred” and new knowledge. The funny thing is that it is still probably the most reliable supercar available.
      cip_zendra
      • 2 Years Ago
      Jermey Clarkson, for the third time in four months, has reviewed the Lexus LFA and he said: "It’s a very long time since I drove something so highbrow, so magnificent, so detailed, so perfect. After driving an LFA, everything else feels as squidgy as one of Arsène Wenger’s coats. There’s only one comparable car I can think of. The Ferrari 599 GTO. Kato, if you follow the show closely. Obviously, this has bags more personality than the LFA and feels so much more human as a result. It’s fallible and confused, and when it rains it goes all to pieces. It’s hard to master, but deeply rewarding when you do. The LFA doesn’t show any of those traits at all. It’s more like a Terminator. You tell it what to do, and it will keep on doing it. It absolutely will not stop. Can you ever love a machine? Of course you can. John Connor did. And I love the LFA."
      Dean
      • 2 Years Ago
      Bummed that I didn't get the chance to buy one! Having the money probably would have helped a bit though...
      Mazdaspeed6
      • 2 Years Ago
      Sad to see one of the legends go. The car that proved that Toyota could build one of the best cars on earth.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Mazdaspeed6
        [blocked]
          carguy1701
          • 2 Years Ago
          SC400 wasn't that quick, brah. GT car, not a sports car.
          • 2 Years Ago
          [blocked]
      flammablewater
      • 2 Years Ago
      I wish every super car sounded like the LFA, but then it wouldn't be so special. And it still looks gorgeous. It sits in my imaginary garage, right next to my F40.
      NamorF-Pro
      • 2 Years Ago
      Sad day yet a happy one cuz they'll make something even greater! Don't like this car? Cars aren't your thing...
      miketim1
      • 2 Years Ago
      15 years from now.... this car will be a serious collector item.
      Rich
      • 2 Years Ago
      So the Supra is coming after all or ??? Lets get the show on the road here Toyota!
      foobar
      • 2 Years Ago
      They stopped because after 2 years the car is already dated looking just like every other recent Japanese cars. That's just too bad because all the tech in this car deserves a better looking package.
        cip_zendra
        • 2 Years Ago
        @foobar
        If the LFA looks dated then the ferrari f12 looks like a 20 years ago supercar.
        rL-gT
        • 2 Years Ago
        @foobar
        Reread what you just wrote...
      Autoblogist
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'm indifferent to production ending on the LFA. The car evoqued almost no emotion other than it's V10 sound.
      nsxrules
      • 2 Years Ago
      Sad to see production end (even if we all knew only 500 would be built). Lexus, get back to work on a succesor!
      Britt Benston
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'm sure there are kits so that you can make your last generation Supra look just like this.
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