In a brief chat with The Telegraph, managing director of Morgan, Charles Morgan, talked about how the tiny UK automaker will navigate the future. Morgan believes that as long as the company can find a way to exploit niche products that the big automakers can't or won't do, and if his firm can be a test bed for new technologies, then there's a way to retain both the Morgan spirit and independence.

One of those upcoming technologies could be a new chassis material of magnesium and aluminum. The combination would allow Morgan to form its panels in the traditional way, but make them 20 percent lighter. You can watch him lay out the company's present and future in the video below, and no matter the material we hope it includes the EvaGT.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      Brodz
      • 2 Years Ago
      There is something very attractive about a small boutique manufacturer that's doing it's own thing, it's own way, at it's own pace. And it's still independent. The world needs more Morgan's.
        Myself
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Brodz
        There is nothing attractive on a British company that builds cars in shed using technologies from the 1930s. Morgans, just like TVR before they thankfully disappeared, are low-quality, low-budget, unreliable and overpriced contraptions. I don't really care what Morgan's boss is saying to appease conservative and traditionalist Telegraph readers. Same thing with Jaguar 's electric turbine car - it was never meant to enter production, the only thing that got cancelled was a PR campaign. If you want a small niche manufacturer that does things right, look at German company Wiesmann, for example. Morgan operations look amateurish next to them.
          imag
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Myself
          I am sorry: you must not have experienced the joy of driving simpler, lighter machines on empty backroads. If you had, you would wish Morgan all the luck in the world. I have tremendous respect for today's mass-produced vehicles. They are safer, faster, more reliable, vehicles, better in every way save one: they aren't as much fun. I don't need 600 horsepower on a back road. I can't use it, and it in fact makes me feel like I cannot exploit the full capability of the car. I don't need sound deadening or perfect suspension or power steering or a serene ride. I want the *experience* of driving. I want the sounds and the smells and the feel of the car through my hands, feet, and butt. That is why some of us appreciate Morgan. In an era when a modern car platform costs over a billion dollars, it is nice to see people hand-building passion cars in a small factory. After all, people love driving classics. What's wrong with building modern cars that are like classics with a bit more power, better brakes, and slightly upgraded reliability? I think it's wonderful that they are still around. Weismann is a great company, but we don't need another. We need Morgan. The three wheeler alone justifies them completely.
          Myself
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Myself
          @imag Read my post carefully. I'm all for light cars and joy and everything. There are cars for that - they are modern, safer, waaaay more reliable and offer pure joy of driving. Mazda MX-5, Lotus Elise... They are built for 21st century using latest technologies. I type this on an iPad, not on a typewriter. Morgan's the past, living off mistaken sense of nostalgia and it's only place is in the history books.
          Brodz
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Myself
          Well as Charles explained. He tours many CEO's of Global vehicle manufacturers around the Morgan factory, because they are the companies that his company sources parts and technology from. So to call them low-budget, low-quality, and unreliable would be to call out the big manufacturers who's components go into making Morgans. i.e. BMW, Ford, and others. Which leads me to conclude that you have formed an opinion without facts, and then given it. Or you lack the cognitive abilities to process the facts, and are therefore ill-qualified to make such a conclusion. For your sake, I hope it's the former.
      ihatedavebushell
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wow - that is a big step forward form the ash tree they currently use for the frame - no more reframing your car at the home wood shop!
        Teleny411
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ihatedavebushell
        I doubt that they will replace the ash frames on the plus 4s. Probably for new products!
      Harold O
      • 2 Years Ago
      Back in the 20s and 30s when aluminum was a new material many of the higher tech cars used it for various parts from body panels to gear housings etc. Simple for lighter [faster] cars .These include Marmon ,Bugatti and others. In the USA our ash trees are being killed by an oriental insect so it's on to metal.
      Vincent Teron
      • 2 Years Ago
      The exploitation of niche materials in their product makes for a very clever business plan. It's probably the only way to keep Morgan relevant as an automobile company.
      eeenok
      • 2 Years Ago
      new chassis material? rover, for example, was using aluminum/magnesium alloy ("birmabright") in car bodies in the 40's