Indianapolis is moving to replace its entire vehicle fleet with electric and plug-in hybrid options. The Detroit News reports mayor Greg Ballard signed an executive order this week that will see Indianapolis replace its sedans with EVs.

Over time, the municipality will work in natural gas-powered snow plows, fire trucks and other heavy equipment in a bid to wean Indianapolis off foreign energy sources. Ballard's plan includes police vehicles, which could save tax payers around $10 million per year in fuel, though the city also maintains a fleet of 500 non-law-enforcement cars. So far, there's no estimation on how much the initial changeover will cost.

Right now, Indianapolis is working with automakers and fleet firms to come up with the best deal for the EV fleet purchase. The area already boasts 200 EV charging stations and plans to install more locations soon. Expect to see the entirety of the Indianapolis fleet switch over to hybrid and electric propulsion by 2025.


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  • 47 Comments
      VDuB
      • 2 Years Ago
      Each IN taxpayer is actually getting a $200 rebate next year because we have a surplus. We're sitting better then most states. I like seeing the EV stations poping up.
      kEiThZ
      • 2 Years Ago
      EVs are perfect for most municipal vehicle fleets. They drive lots. But it's all small distances. And they have central depots where they can leave the vehicles to charge. And they often have long stretches (like at night) where the vehicles can be charged. Also, with gas vehicles, they often turn over the fleet more regularly than any car owner would. Maybe that can slow down with EVs. As for police vehicles, would love to see some city or town team up with Tesla to build an EV police intercepter. AWD. Super acceleration. High fuel economy. On-board power to power computers and accessories. Perfect police vehicle.
      turboawdftw
      • 2 Years Ago
      I am in agreement with this mayor's efforts. Although chevy volts aren't cheap, in general, all government fleets need to switch to more efficient vehicles. And I HATE it that cops keep their engines running when they're eating lunch for 1 hour. city fleets should not be using large vehicles unless necessary. I work next to a County of San Bernardino (CA) office, and the parking lot is full of mid-size and larger cars... Why does the County and City (which is bankrupt btw) need large cars? Do you really need a ford fusion or a ford explorer?? They should have Ford Fiestas w/ the 1.0L ecoboost engine. If you're too fat to get into the fiesta... too bad so sad, i guess you dont get to drive it! Sometimes i think they buy larger vehicles so that fat people can fit in them easier... When the Cruze diesel gets here, the fleets will have a viable, US made (or at least with a US nameplate) car that is efficient. Police cars should be 2.0L ford focuses, or at the largest, a fusion... There is no need for a ecoboost Taurus. No other police force in the world has as large a fleet like the US law enforcement... Tahoes, Suburbans?? What is the need for such vehicles unless you're transporting a VIP??
      Marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      Congratulations to Mayor Greg Ballard , for instituting such a far sighted policy for his city fleet. This isn't just a whim by Mayor Ballard, but part of a planned Transport policy initiated by business leaders, but with bi-partisan support from both political parties to spend $10 billion on a multi-model regional transportation plan that includes expanded roadways, express bus routes, light rail, and commuter rail pathways. Many other municipalities will be studying the experience of Indianapolis to initiate plans of their own. It's this sort of initiative that allowed the City of Indianapolis avoid much the urban decay and social unrest that beset so many American cities.
      • 2 Years Ago
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        Alfonso T. Alvarez
        • 2 Years Ago
        Yeah boy - just wait till those crooks are being 'hot' pursued by a Prius - or a cop needs to 'nudge' a fleeing vehicle to spin it out - YEAH!! Prius is the right tool for this (not to mention that they are all built in Japan) Did you even think about what you just posted?
          icemilkcoffee
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Alfonso T. Alvarez
          The hybrid Camry is fast enough to be a cop car.
        • 2 Years Ago
        [blocked]
        icemilkcoffee
        • 2 Years Ago
        Electric cars like the Leaf get the equivalent of >100mpg. At current gas price, you could save about $500 per year over the 50mpg Prius. If you keep the Leaf 7 years you would recuperate the roughly $3500 price difference between the Leaf and the Prius. This is assuming gas price stays the same for the next 7 years. Do you want to take that bet?
          edward.stallings
          • 2 Years Ago
          @icemilkcoffee
          You still can't take the leaf too far from town before you need a tow truck. A Prius is a real car, usable for a variety of transportation needs. Working girl can drive around town during the week, go 400 miles to the beach on the weekend, go across country to see the parents a couple times a year. The Nissan leaf is a joke.
        • 2 Years Ago
        [blocked]
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        Dave D
        • 2 Years Ago
        Nobody, That is just a stupid statement and you've got to calm the hysterics until you actually have FACTS. Gov't fleets have to deal with total ROI over long periods of time and you have no idea how much they're paying for the vehicles or how much fuel and maintenance they are saving. It could be a positive ROI or it may not...but we simply don't know yet. You're also ignoring that some cities have so much smog or even noise pollution that they have other issues to deal with that also cost them money. As for your assertion about businesses doing it: Fedex, UPS and Frito Lay all have at least small fleets they are testing and Fedex is using them exclusively in some areas of lower Manhattan.
        • 2 Years Ago
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        untitledfolder
        • 2 Years Ago
        Ya, ok Teapartier. We shouldn't spend taxes on anything. There's no such thing as budgets in la-la land where you live. You just rage at everything that evil gubbamint does!
        icemilkcoffee
        • 2 Years Ago
        There are lots of sensible things that businesses aren't doing because their sole focus is on QonQ growth. They don't plan 10 years down the road. A typical CEO will pump up the stock price and jump ship to bigger and better things before the house of cards collapse. Also- the government looks out for the good of all. Businesses look out for number 1 only. Quite a different goal.
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @icemilkcoffee
          @ icemilkcoffee "the government looks out for the good of all" ROTFLMAO! Oh, dear, where on earth do you live ? Pleasantville ?
      dukeisduke
      • 2 Years Ago
      An executive order? So he can just unilaterally do things, without city council approval? Doesn't sound like good government to me.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dukeisduke
        [blocked]
        Sir Duke
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dukeisduke
        For the record, every level of government can issue executive orders. Problem with EOs is that the next executive (Mayor, Governor, President) can wipe it out with another executive order. Laws however are harder to overturn.
      edward.stallings
      • 2 Years Ago
      Waste of taxpayers money. Typical government....
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        Jake
        • 2 Years Ago
        I agree with you. My problem is that anytime I see an electric car, my mind automatically discounts the claimed range by 50%. Not sure what the real world numbers are on the Volt. There are a couple of them where I work and the company installed plug in stations for people who have them. I should track these folks down and see what they're getting.
          John Hansen
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jake
          Well, I have one, so here are some actual numbers. EPA rating: 38 miles of EV range (I have a 2013) Best observed: 43 miles (113% of EPA estimate, 85 degree weather) Worst observed: 27 miles (71% of EPA estimate, 15 degree weather) Current MPG: 318 (and it feels gooooood)
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jake
          [blocked]
          edward.stallings
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jake
          If you drive like an enthusiast + if you use the heat, AC and lights (keep in mind that in the rain the best way to defog is to use AC and heat to blow hot, dry air) and wipers, you are probably right. Hilly terrain also makes range worse. So you can say that SVX pearlie is the ignorant one.
      graphikzking
      • 2 Years Ago
      I think it could provide a cost savings quicker if they did a few of the following: Why do city's buy large cars? 99% of the time it's 1 single person in them yet they all drive Fusion, Camry, etc. Why not save $3,000-$4,000 up-front and also save more on gas in the long run by purchasing a Civic, Corolla, Focus? I love that they are forward thinking! We have spent BILLIONS on 2 wars in Iraq and now funneling money for Iran. If we didn't use a gallon of foreign oil because we used renewable DOMESTIC resources then there are be less people fighting over the oil. Think about it - the money we spent in Iraq on the 2nd war could provide 100% of our electric needs for 65,000,000 people with solar panels. That's 22% of our country's electric requirement. It would also have saved countless military lives. Would have provided more well paying jobs here with installers, solar panel manufacturing (done by Sharp in New Mexico) etc. Who knows how much money we are STILL spending in Iraq trying to fund their government and keep them in place. THINK ABOUT THIS: The wealthy people that hold onto their money and give a little to charity etc.. their kids and grandkids are taken care of. The "rich" people that spend it as they get it (athletes etc) their kids may be ok.. but their families have to go right back to the normal grind. If our government keeps giving money away like there is no tomorrow - then we won't be the "wealthy" country in 10-20 years. The countries that are forward thinking will have all the money and be laughing at how we as a society are struggling to just maintain. We need to keep our money and reinvest in our country and people. Stop giving it away. It sounds harsh.. but it's the truth - we won't be able to help ourselves in 10 years and no one will be there to help us!
      Mr. Sled
      • 2 Years Ago
      Good for Indianapolis! Finally a politician that can see past the "short term". Nice.
      Vinuuz
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ah, and IN gets all the electricity that is used to charge these vehicles from non conventional power sources, am pretty sure :P
        Ryan
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Vinuuz
        There is a big wind farm west of Indy I think. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoosier_Wind_Farm They could add more of those or solar panels much easier than drilling and refining non-existent oil. And since I live downwind of Indy, I approve of this plan.
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