It's only been two years since the Chevrolet Volt first when on sale, but Chevrolet is saying that owners of the car have driven a collective 100 million all-electric miles in this short period of time. Like any other alternatively powered car, owners are finding ways to maximize efficiency, and Chevrolet states that Volt owners are traveling under electric power more than 65 percent of the time leading to a savings in gasoline expenses to the tune of $1,370 per year.

In terms of gasoline, Volt owners are spending $1,370 less per year, but on the bigger scale, this represents a total savings of five million gallons of gas. With regular charges, Chevy says that the Volt can drive almost 900 miles on average before needing more gasoline, and one driver, Andrew Byrne of Los Angeles, said that he was able to drive 1,900 miles between fill-ups.

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Chevrolet Volt Owners Surpass 100 Million Electric Miles
5 million gallons of fuel saved; $1,300 a year in fuel costs avoided


DETROIT – Chevrolet Volt owners collectively have driven more than 100 million all-electric miles since the vehicle went on sale two years ago this month. The average Volt owner travels more than 65 percent of the time in pure electric mode as the car was designed – only using the gasoline-powered generator for longer trips.

By charging regularly, Volt owners drive approximately 900 miles, or a month and a half, between fill-ups. However, many Volt owners quickly exceed that average, based on an EPA-estimated 98 MPGe that puts electric-only range at 35 mpg city and 40 mpg on the highway. Andrew Byrne from Los Angeles is one of these drivers.

"Since my daily driving is all electric, I only really need to buy gas for long road trips," Byrne said. "I drove over 1,900 miles on my last tank of gas."

With each avoided trip to the gas station, Volt drivers continue to increase their return on investment. Based on EPA estimates and compared to the average new vehicle sold in the United States, Volt owners are saving about $1,370 a year in fuel costs.

"The best sign of a great product is when your customers are the most satisfied in the industry," said Cristi Landy, Chevrolet Volt marketing director. "Volt owners have found the Volt is not only fun to drive, but provides technology and performance where consumers need it most."

This is the second year in a row the Volt has topped the satisfaction survey of one of the leading consumer testing organizations in the United States.

"My commute is 55 miles round trip, but with the Volt I use 80 percent less gas and save over $150 each month," said Farris Khan from southeastern Michigan. "Plus the Volt is really fun to drive because of its instant torque; driving anything else feels like yester-tech!"

For the typical driver, the average Volt savings equates to:

Nine weeks of groceries at $151 per week
228 car washes at $6 per car wash
137 movie tickets at $10 per ticket

The 5 million gallons of gas saved is equivalent to $21 million in gasoline costs averted overall based on $4 per gallon of premium, or more than two supertankers of gas.

For the first 38 miles, the Volt can drive gas and tailpipe-emissions free using a full charge of electricity stored in its 16.50-kWh lithium-ion battery. When the Volt's battery runs low, a gas-powered engine/generator seamlessly operates to extend the driving range another 344 miles on a full tank.

Founded in 1911 in Detroit, Chevrolet is now one of the world's largest car brands, doing business in more than 140 countries and selling more than 4 million cars and trucks a year. Chevrolet provides customers with fuel-efficient vehicles that feature spirited performance, expressive design, and high quality. More information on Chevrolet models can be found at www.chevrolet.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 116 Comments
      MisterTurbo
      • 2 Years Ago
      Our volt has eeked past 2k miles. We still have 1/2 of the original tank of gas. Not too shabby for $20 in electricity it costs us a month.
      jamcar00
      • 2 Years Ago
      I have had my Volt for 3 months. I have driven 2000 miles in that time. I have consumed 1.7 gallons of gas in 61 miles of gas engine use (35.9 mpg). The other 1940 miles have cost me $0.033 per mile in electricity consumption. I am getting an average of 3.3 miles per kWh consumed, so using EPA's equivalency of 1 gal gas = 33.7 kWh, my electric mode driving is at an equivalent 111 miles per gallon.
      LynxFX
      • 2 Years Ago
      Honest question here, with how long between fill ups some people are doing and that gasoline can "go bad" in real world conditions within a month or two, have there been any problems or potential problems with people running bad gas in their Volt? You can add a fuel stabilizer but you need to put that in when the gas is fresh.
        Don G
        • 2 Years Ago
        @LynxFX
        The Volt has a engine maintainence function that runs the engine once in a while to lubricate the engine and use the gas. The design is to use at least one full tank per year. This is the shelf life for Super Unleaded which is why it is required in the Volt.
        @bobbleheadguru
        • 2 Years Ago
        @LynxFX
        The Volt tank is secured a little tighter than an average tank. You have to push a button inside the car and unscrew the cap on the outside to get the tank open to refill. Also the car will burn a little gas if you have truly not used any in weeks.
        Randy
        • 2 Years Ago
        @LynxFX
        Not sure but I've used year old gas in mowers, snow throwers and weed wackers without a problem. I'd imagine one could use a gas stabilizer in a Volt if they wanted to increase the longevity of gas life but I'd check to make sure the warranty wouldn't be voided with its use before using it.
      bluemoonric
      • 2 Years Ago
      Where else can you lease a $40,000 car for $299 month?
      VL00
      • 2 Years Ago
      For the clueless posters: Yes, there is a $7500 tax credit for plug-in vehicles (with a large enough battery). You didn't fund it any more than I funded your children, or the people living in the apartment complex down the street funded your home purchase (mortage interest deduction). Why don't I see delusional tea party members in DC demonstrating against the home ownership and child tax subsidies??? Ignorant people get their panties in a twist over me saving $7500 on taxes with the Volt, but apparently don't care at all about the $40,000 I didn't pay in taxes over the last 8 years because of my mortgage, or the fact that EVERY CHILD in America is subsidized to the tune of $17,500. Coal - Yes, we use coal to generate electricity in the US. And an electric car still produces FEWER emissions than a gasoline car EVEN when using coal derived energy. The point of an electric car is that electricity can be produced without ANY emissions - such as nuclear, which provides electricity for my Volt. Get a new talking point. High sticker price - Not. The Volt (after rebate) starts at $32,500. The AVERAGE sale price of a new car in the US is $30k. So $30k is average and $32.5k is high?? I drove 11,500 miles last year on 43 gallons of gas and $175 in electricity. If people took 2 seconds to analyze the cost of driving a car, they're realize the Volt easily beats the average new car over an average ownership period (6 years), in fact the Volt is cheaper to own even WITHOUT the tax rebate. Its not expensive, ITS CHEAPER than average. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0Ageg_Pnricg9dGZTVW9ZTzFNWHJlMmhrNDh2TVZ6cXc#gid=0 Biggest benefit of the Volt is rarely going to gas stations - I go about once every 75 days. You'll never again find yourself standing in 34 degree rain buying gas when you're already running late to an appointment. Also, the smell of gasoline and its constituent cancer causing compounds is something I really enjoy NOT being around much any more. You might want to look up "Peak Oil" if you're unfamiliar with the inescapable fact that oil PRODUCTION will peak and decline - tar sands/shale oil will be thoroughly exploited and yet offer no antidote. You can't pump continually increasing amounts of a finite resource for an infinite number of years.
        over9000
        • 2 Years Ago
        @VL00
        you're so stupid, spending over $30k for a compact car and it's a Chevy.... and how much harm do you think you've done to manufacture and dispose the batteries? if you want to get that snobby.... Damn Chevy Volt owners are more obnoxious than Prius owners.
          Jason Krumvieda
          • 2 Years Ago
          @over9000
          Well obnoxious comes with the territory, It is like talking to a Vegetarian The fact that they have a hybrid and they don't eat meat are usually the 2nd and 3rd things that they tell you. "Hi my name is Albert Arnold and I drive hybrid, did I mention that I don't eat meat but I like to smush it up and shape it like meat before I eat it?" I would never buy a 30k compact. And before you argue that that is the going rate for all cars that size...BS. It is the billions being dumped into the economy each month by the fed that is making the dollar worth nothing.
          over9000
          • 2 Years Ago
          @over9000
          and how much work and resources are needed to recycle batteries? You can recycle just about anything idiot. Clueless idiots are more obnoxious than any "troll". Stop getting into Government Motor marketing hype.
        Jason Krumvieda
        • 2 Years Ago
        @VL00
        That is a great example of why to buy a Volt. I never will because I have 3 kids and this thing only seats 4. My daily commute is total round trip of less than 25 miles so this would be great. I don't like it because it is ugly, unless it is all black to hide that weird thing below the windows. Part of my commute involves 2 miles on a gravel road, I would spend all of the money saved on car washes.
          VL00
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jason Krumvieda
          I took me a while to warm up to it after being disappointed with the changes from the concept car. GM blames it all on aerodynamics, but Tesla has proven that's no excuse. The Volt is impressive overall, but the Model S has better packaging (flat battery). Hopefully I'll be upgrading to a Model S next year.
        Rich
        • 2 Years Ago
        @VL00
        Do you have these rants pre-made? or off the cuff... you must me a court stenographer haha
      ss1591
      • 2 Years Ago
      I went 3800 before I needed my first fill up with my Volt. So far I have gone 4990 miles on 15 gallons of gas and I only have the 120V charger, great car GM.
      Jean Lafitte
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's nice to see yuppie welfare in action - tax credits so that most of us who pay Federal Income Tax can finance a few affluent people's Volts. Meanwhile, back at the plant... workers at the factory that makes Chevy Volt batteries are sweeping the floors, playing video poker, Monopoly... 'cause there's no work making Volt batteries. Nice work if you can get it. Seriously, if we want to balance the budget, we could do a LOT worse than drop the Volt from the GM line up. If it had to compete heads-up (no tax-subsidies or stimulus-funded plants like the LG battery plant) with ICE or gas-electric hybrids, the backlog of unsold Volts would be higher than its present 6,000. Alternatively, why not put those Volts to work in the Government in applications like postal delivery (perhaps in a crossover version - where USPS already uses crossovers)? The stop/start driving pattern would probably be very suited to a hybrid vehicle. It'd also allow surveillance of the Volt fleet and feedback to GM's engineers.
        Smilingoat
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jean Lafitte
        Where do you live, i'd really like to know. Chances are you wont respond.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Smilingoat
          [blocked]
          Jason Krumvieda
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Smilingoat
          Jean has a very good point. The typical Volt owner is a well-off White male. Why not do what we heard about 1000 times in the campaign (and now) and just pay a bit more, it is fair. If you don't agree with my statement then you are doing the "do as I say, but not as I do" crowd.
        montoym
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jean Lafitte
        quote from Jean Lafitte - "It's nice to see yuppie welfare in action - tax credits so that most of us who pay Federal Income Tax can finance a few affluent people's Volts.: - The irony there is that it's the affluent people in this country that are paying the Federal Income Taxes. The top 1% paid 37.4% of the Federal Income taxes in 2010 The top 5% paid 59.1% of the Federal Income taxes in 2010 The top 10% paid 70.6% of the Federal Income taxes in 2010 The top 50% paid 97.6% of the Federal Income taxes in 2010 Data taken form the CBO and compiled into a handy chart by The Tax Foundation. See this link and scroll down to Table 1: http://taxfoundation.org/article/summary-latest-federal-income-tax-data-2012 But no, the rich aren't paying their fair share right?
        Carguy
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jean Lafitte
        Where did you get the 6000 number from - all I have heard of is a 30 day number which is way shorter than most cars out there. Plus pick any dealer in So. Cal and call them and see if they have more than 3 cars on there lot. The answer is this car sells well when incentivized by good lease offers - but that is the case with BMW and Mercedes and pretty much every car out there.
      over9000
      • 2 Years Ago
      Gas savings of $1300 per year.... gee doesn't make any financial sense if your compact car costs over $40k to begin with.
        Snark
        • 2 Years Ago
        @over9000
        Most folks lease the Volt, and those that buy have tax credits they can take advantage of. Most Volt leases are under $300 a month, and at that rate, it absolutely makes financial sense. Even if purchasing, there are a ton of other well-equipped, comfortable $40k small sedans that cost much more to run - the 3-series is no bigger.
          over9000
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Snark
          absolutely not, you're just renting a car with limited mileage on it. The car is never really yours.
        Donny Hoover
        • 2 Years Ago
        @over9000
        Down to about 33k with the tax credit. Down to 20k in ten years. Yeah, that's worth it, especially since people seem to be keeping their cars for longer.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Donny Hoover
          [blocked]
          Donny Hoover
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Donny Hoover
          Not to mention paying a net 20k to buy a Volt. That's a nice-ass car for 20k.
          Donny Hoover
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Donny Hoover
          I don't know where you got that $1300 figure but I was using that. A civic is more efficient than the type of car that many people in this country have and yet, according to fueleconomy.gov, the volt will still save you $7500 in fuel costs over a civic in ten years. So, you'll take a little longer to break even against a very fuel efficient car, but you still will. I really don't care that you are deeper in the hole initially. If that was the only thing that mattered, nobody would buy a prius or the hybrid version of any other car. For your other concerns: No, not really. Considering that everyone seems to be saying that new cars from any brand are more reliable than ever and that hybrids have not only been more reliable than expected but been more reliable than most cars of any type. Battery packs: The ones in the prius seem to be holding up longer than expected and anybody that has experience with batteries will tell you that those NiMH ones are complete garbage compared to these Lithium ones. I don't disagree that it will depreciate like crazy, hence the same value in ten years as a car that stickers for half as much.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Donny Hoover
          [blocked]
          Donny Hoover
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Donny Hoover
          Depreciation doesn't matter dude. If you're planning to run the car either until it drops or until it is hardly worth anything, the value that you can sell it for is irrelevant. Personally, I share your attitude on the sunk costs. Money right now is more valuable to me, even in cases where spending it could save me money in the long run. But, I wouldn't fault someone else for choosing to put up the cash up front. The battery depletion is not as big an issue as you are making it and here is why: The main "killer" of lithium packs is heat. This can be due to anything from rapid discharge to just plain sitting out in the desert, as is the case with the leaf. The difference with appliances like laptops is those things get damn hot. Heck, sometimes you can fry an egg on their cooling plates. There's no active cooling or advanced control programs to babysit your laptop battery and ensure that it has a good, long life. And why should there be? In 4 years when the battery is worn out, you have an obsolete POS computer, cell phone, etc. that there's no reason to keep anyway. Why the hell would anyone spend the money/time to engineer in provisions to save the batteries for a product that only needs to last 4 years anyway? A car that is supposed to last 10 or 15 is a little different, and a lot of these provisions, such as active cooling, were put into the volt. Now, let's say that the batteries fail anyway. That's a $3,000 job right now. What do you think it will cost in ten years? Not $3,000 or even close.
          Donny Hoover
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Donny Hoover
          You keep calling me stupid but you keep bringing up the most idiotic, asinine points. Ever hear of a heat exchanger? You know, that thing that cools your engine every time you drive your car? That thing that can keep your house at 60 degrees even though it is 95 outside? I bought this thing called a freezer and it saved me hundreds a year. All of a sudden, I no longer had to drive to the nearest glacier and chip some ice off every time I wanted a margarita. You should look into one. Absolutely F#$%ing amazing! I can keep things cool and I don't have to live in Antarctica! It is a fact not open to debate that a car is not a four year appliance, akin to a laptop or a cell phone. I believe the longest warranty offered is currently 10 years, 100k miles? It is expected that your car will last that long, based on a history of...wait for it....cars actually lasting that long, and given Honda and Toyota's efforts the past couple decades, twice that long is not at all unreasonable. With that, I'm done arguing. They've found that the thing is cheaper to own than an average car. The cheapest car to own bar none? Probably not. But, I haven't seen anything out of you other than B.S. speculation and uneducated, idiotic statements. You lost me at trying to call an automobile a short term throw away appliance. What a joke.
      Spiffster
      • 2 Years Ago
      OK, so does this post have anything to do with the 7500 dollar tax rebate on EVs... anything at all? I have read it twice and I cant find the connection, not even in the press release. Whats with all these posts about the apparent injustice of the rebate? What motivates people to obsessively point out the negative in a very positive milestone. Yes, I have a Volt. Love or hate GM, this is a fantastic car and its truly a marvel of american ingenuity. People should be proud of what the Volt represents. Must be miserable waking up every day so bitter at the world.
        John Doe
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spiffster
        Republicans should love the Volt. The $7500 is a credit not a rebate. You get to keep more of your money for creating jobs. Since when are republicans against lower taxes?
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @John Doe
          Not only lower taxes but help lower the trade deficit by using less oil, help reduce further entanglements in the mid-east over oil, help provide America jobs to those that designed and build the Volt, help provide America jobs to electric utilities, help provide American jobs to natural gas drillers, coal miners, PV installers, wind turbine makers/installers, etc.
      Smilingoat
      • 2 Years Ago
      The government would save more money by axing the $1 bill than the subsidies on these cars, and over 10x If we axed the $1 (in favor and coins) and stopped producing pennies and nickles. Plus the the proposed rounding system would mean that consumers and businesses would break even, things would not cost less, or more. but hey, lets not think of these kind of changes when we can cheat someone out of their job. **** the redneck south.
        Jean Lafitte
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Smilingoat
        Naw. Let's cheat someone out of their job the Democrat way, by taxing small businesses OUT of business and spending the money on big unions and subsidies for yuppie toys. By the way, I'm in Colorado. Way to exhibit that double-digit IQ and unionized education.
          Rob J
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jean Lafitte
          He is just repeating what the American Spectator told him.
          Rich
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jean Lafitte
          Love this guy... all good points... not sure how they relate to this or each other, but alright :) Its the god damned Gov't fault :D
      Jason Krumvieda
      • 2 Years Ago
      I like all of the Pro-GM Volt Ad's...err ....I mean articles.
      TrueDat
      • 2 Years Ago
      that's roughly 8 miles a day for each Volt out there.... wow.... impressive....
        Spiffster
        • 2 Years Ago
        @TrueDat
        You're "roughly" full of crap. (100M / Total Volts sold / days on the road == 8)? Where the hell are you getting that last variable from?
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