This morning, Honda announced a bunch of impressive numbers for the upcoming 2014 Accord Plug-In Hybrid at the Los Angeles Auto Show. To wit: 115 MPGe, estimated 49 city/45 highway/47 combined fuel economy and an MSRP of $39,780. During the announcement, the Accord PHEV was called the "highest fuel economy of any plug-in vehicle, period."

While for this may hold true for some customers, the fundamental nature of PHEVs means that actual mileage will vary widely, depending on the number of miles one can travel on the energy stored in the battery and the owners driving cycle.

For instance, the Accord with a cord can go about 13 miles before it starts burning gasoline, while the 2013 Chevy Volt – which is rated at "only" 98 MPGe and sports a similar $39,145 price tag – eschews running its internal combustion engine for around 38 miles. Of course, the Volt can only seat four, so perhaps a closer competitor might be the Ford Fusion Energi. It is rated at 100 MPGe, is said to be good for 20 initial gasoline-free miles and has a base price of $39,495.

The Accord plug-in will become the first production vehicle in America to meet the SULEV 20 requirements. The Accord Plug-In Hybrid goes on sale January 15, 2013 in California and New York. We recently got to drive the PHEV, and you can read all about that here.
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2013 Honda Civic Debuts at L.A. Auto Show Packed with Additional
Features, Cementing its Class-Leading Status

Pricing announced for January debut of Accord Plug-In with class-leading MPGe, Accord Hybrid due next summer; Auto show debuts for 2013 Crosstour and CR-Z


TORRANCE, Calif., Nov. 29, 2012 – The 2013 Honda Civic debuted today at the 2012 Los Angeles Auto Show sporting extensive interior and exterior design upgrades, enhanced dynamics, and a host of new standard features. Honda also announced that the 2014 Accord Plug-In Hybrid earned a class-leading EPA-certified 115 MPGe rating and will go on sale in New York and California on January 15 with an MSRP of $39,7801. Separately, the Accord Hybrid, featuring Honda's new two-motor hybrid system, will launch nationwide next summer with anticipated class-leading2 fuel economy of 49/45/47 city/hwy/combined. The thoroughly revised 2013 Honda Crosstour and 2013 Honda CR-Z also made their auto-show debuts.
"Our industry has never been more competitive or fast changing, and a significant refresh of Civic, America's best-selling compact car, just one model year after its debut as an all-new model shows true speed to market," said John Mendel, American Honda executive vice president of Sales. "Our corporate direction is to provide our customers with great products with speed, affordability and low CO2 emissions. There is no better example of this direction than today's introduction of the 2013 Honda Civic."

The 2013 Honda Civic Sedan, the nation's best-selling compact car which celebrates its 40th anniversary in America next year, goes on sale today with extensive changes to further reinforce its market leadership. While still maintaining all the efficiency and value that has made the Civic an automotive icon, the 2013 Honda Civic Sedan receives all-new front and rear exterior styling, while all Civics sport extensive interior upgrades including more luxurious finishes, and a host of new standard equipment.

Retuned steering and suspension sharpen the Civic's handling, extensive chassis upgrades including Honda's ACE™ II body structure improve safety, ride comfort and interior quietness, and every Civic model has more popular standard features including Bluetooth® HandsFreeLink®, rearview camera, Pandora® Interface, SMS text message feature, and steering wheel audio controls. The 2013 Civic arrives with even greater value for money, adding highly desired feature with an MSRP increase of only $160 across the lineup. Pricing for the exceptionally well-equipped 2013 Civic LX Sedan begins at $18,1651.

2014 Honda Accord Plug-In and Accord Hybrid
Honda announced at the Los Angeles Auto Show today that the 2014 Accord Plug-In Hybrid will be available for retail sale and lease beginning January 15 in California and New York, with an MSRP of $39,780.1 The 2014 Accord Plug-In has earned the highest EPA MPGe rating3 in its class (115 MPGe), surpassing plug-in-class competitors including the Ford C-Max Energi (100 MPGe), Chevy Volt (98 MPGe), and Prius Plug-in (95 MPGe). The 2014 Accord Plug-in has been rated by the EPA with a maximum all-electric EV mode range of 13 miles, and a fuel-economy rating of 47/46/46 mpg (city/hwy/combined). The Accord Plug-in is the first production car in America to meet the more stringent new LEV3/SULEV20 emissions standard, and it will also qualify for single-occupant carpool-lane access in California.

The two-motor Accord Hybrid will launch nationwide next summer, with anticipated class-leading2 fuel economy ratings of 49/45/47 mpg (city/hwy/combined). Unlike the unique styling of the Accord Plug-In, the Accord Hybrid will share styling much closer the conventional Accord Sedan. More details on the Accord Hybrid will be released closer to launch.

2013 Honda Crosstour and CR-Z
The thoroughly revised 2013 Honda Crosstour and 2013 Honda CR-Z made their auto show debuts today, both vehicles having gone on sale the previous week. The 2013 Honda Crosstour arrives with extensive updates to both four-cylinder and V-6 models, and a starting MSRP $525 lower than in 2012. The 2013 Crosstour offers more purposeful exterior styling, significant upgrades to the interior design and materials, and a more powerful, more fuel-efficient available Earth Dreams™ V-6 engine coupled to a six-speed automatic transmission with paddle-shift control. The 2013 Crosstour is one of the first Honda models available with the new keyless Smart Entry with Push Button start and Honda's new LaneWatch™ blind-spot display. Other standard visibility-enhancing features include a rearview camera and new re-shaped rear headrests.

The 2013 Honda CR-Z Sport Hybrid Coupe arrives with more power and better fuel efficiency thanks to an all-new Lithium-Ion battery pack, and a new Plus Sport System™ allows improved passing performance via additional on-demand electric boost, activated by a steering wheel-mounted "S+" button. Styling upgrades include revised interior trim, a new front fascia and a new aerodynamically functional rear diffuser. The CR-Z's standard equipment list – which already includes automatic climate control, power windows and door locks, remote entry and cruise control – adds Bluetooth® HandsFreeLink®, rearview camera and an Expanded View Driver's Mirror for 2013.

For more media information and images from Honda's 2012 Los Angeles Auto Show debuts, please visit HondaNews.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 28 Comments
      TPGIII
      • 2 Years Ago
      Excellent job Honda! It's good to see you are now taking hybrids serious, and moving beyond IMA. Now please take all this new technology and remake the original Insight. You should be able to close the gap on MPG and MPGe making it less economically advantageous to plug in. If VW manages to deliver on the XL1, you will be too late. On the other hand, you could but this power train in the CRZ. That should top the Prius in mileage and run circles around it.
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      13 miles for $40K? LOL. No thanks. Buyers are much better off with the Volt, C-Max Energi, or Fusion Energi. Even the plug-in Prius is a better deal.
      RC
      • 2 Years Ago
      At some point hybrids will no longer make economical sense. I just wonder what it will take to tip the scale towards EVs.
        SVX pearlie
        • 2 Years Ago
        @RC
        BEVs are going to need batteries with: - 240V at-destination charging - 480V Level III quick charging infrastructure for longer-distance travel - guaranteed long-duration range of 60+ miles - efficient recycling of battery & motor cores. Right now, the lack of infrastructure pushes people to want 80-mile, 100-mile range. The lack of recycling pushes high upfront costs. And potential for high pack degradation hurts long term predictability.
          SVX pearlie
          • 2 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          The issue with pack sizes is packaging. An 80-mile pack is literally twice the size (and weight) of a 40-miler, which is 2x the size of a 20-miler, which is 2x the size of a 10-miler. If you design the car for an 80-mile pack, but only put a 10-mile pack inside, then you have a lot of wasted space / inefficient packaging. If you design for a 10-miler, but try to graft a 80-miler in, you lose the entire trunk, and suffer negative shifts in weight.
          JakeY
          • 2 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          What BEVs really need are pack size options (akin to engine options in ICE cars), not the one-size-fits-all that almost all of them follow (Tesla Model S the notable exception). This equally applies to PHEVs. There's people willing to spend $5k or $10k extra for a Leaf with 50% or 100% more battery, but aren't willing to spend $22k more to jump to a base Model S (which targets a different market in the first place). There's similar people wanting a Volt with more or less battery. Lack of recycling isn't an issue when reuse is perfectly viable (what Tesla is already doing with Roadster packs being used by SolarCity for local grid storage and will do so with the Model S also judging by their early replacement battery program). I think we will see more and more reuse from the industry. And the prices of the raw material for lithium ion batteries most manufacturers use actually isn't driven by recycling (given it's not profitable to recycle most lithium batteries and the manufacturer pays a relatively small fee to recycle a pack). The only exception is Tesla which uses cobalt rich cells in the Roadster (the cobalt is profitable to recycle), although the cells in the Model S will use 8x less cobalt per kWh. http://www.teslamotors.com/blog/teslas-closed-loop-battery-recycling-program We already have packs using cells that have very good durability (Fit EV with Toshiba SCiB and Spark EV with A123), but the automakers who make them are primarily doing compliance vehicles and not doing any kind of advertising focused on battery durability.
      SVX pearlie
      • 2 Years Ago
      So we'll have the Accord PHEV, Fusion Energi, Volt, PIP, and whom else with an entry next year? Should be an interesting comparo.
      diffrunt
      • 2 Years Ago
      Not a single kiss principle in any of those cars
        SVX pearlie
        • 2 Years Ago
        @diffrunt
        Given the inherent complexity of developing a dual-drive system of any sort, and a limited budget requiring maximum reuse, what, exactly, would you have done better?
      Sasparilla Fizz
      • 2 Years Ago
      So, you've basically got a Plug In Prius for significantly more money and a Generation 1 drive system...underwhelming, although par for the course for Honda over the last 5 years or so.... Energi, Volt or even the PIP would be a better choice, IMHO...
        SVX pearlie
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Sasparilla Fizz
        PIP has only 11 miles AER, and that's on the generous side - most review are coming in at 10 miles or less. If the Accord AER range is 13-15, then it could justify itself over the PIP. Energi & Volt are both hands-down superior to either Japanese alternative.
          SVX pearlie
          • 2 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          Same price as the "Advanced" PIP.
          PeterScott
          • 2 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          So $8000 more for 2 more miles AER? What a steal. If you going to pay $40K for a plug in, get a Volt with triple the range.
      BipDBo
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Volt just needs a more efficient Atkinson cycle engine for marketing, if for nothing else. GM just threw in a simple, old steel engine knowing that with a 40 mile EV range, the engine wouldn't be used very often. Most miles are logged in daily commuting, not on long road trips. Over the entire life of an average Volt, I doubt that the fuel efficiency in range extending mode will make much of difference in total gas used. It's the longer EV range that makes the Volt stand out among other PHEVs.
        PeterScott
        • 2 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        There is a chance that people who buy Volts actually have higher than average road trip needs. Otherwise a longer range Leaf might make more sense. If you have a range extender, the aim should be high efficiency.
        SVX pearlie
        • 2 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        Exactly. The Volt could drop to 30 mpg in gas mode, and it wouldn't affect the net mileage by more than 5%.
      Jesse Gurr
      • 2 Years Ago
      They are only getting 13 miles out of a 6.7 kWh battery? The C-Max energi has what, a 7.5 kWh battery and gets 21 miles. How can this get better MPGe but somehow gets less range with almost the same size battery? Do they have a bigger buffer than the 85% or so other companies use so they don't overtax their batteries?
      2 wheeled menace
      • 2 Years Ago
      At that price tag, the battery needs a longer lifespan, at least double. Why not use double the amp hours of a lower discharge chemistry? you'd get more bang for your buck that way.. oh well, i guess they don't get it.. On the upside, Honda seems to finally have figured out how to get decent fuel economy on a gas hybrid. I think the Volt is the better deal by a long shot. Here here for American plug-in hybrid dominance !!
      Rotation
      • 2 Years Ago
      I don't get how it's the highest fuel economy of any plug-in when the PiP does better. I wish we'd see more EREVs, but this is great for a PHEV. Okay, Honda. TIme for the photo of the trunk. If thing's trunk isn't eaten up with batteries, this thing will be dynamite. It'll kill the plug-in-Prius for most people (leaving only hatch fans).
        SVX pearlie
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        @Rotation: The higher effective fuel economy is likely due to the larger battery and increased electric range of 13 vs 11 miles.
        Nick Kordich
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        According to the Honda link below the batteries are mounted above the rear suspension, which "helps" preserve trunk space. The 2013 redesign increased Accord sedan trunk space to almost 16 cubic feet, so even if there is some intrusion, space should still be ample. http://www.honda.com/newsandviews/article.aspx?id=6824-en I wonder what the compromise would be (in price and trunk space, and to a lesser degree handling and fuel economy) if they offered an extra-capacity option for the battery, such as one that doubled the range. At 10-15 miles, you're only saving about a dollar by plugging in - I can see drivers getting it for the HOV access and not bothering to plug it in, especially if it's not convenient to charge where they park (such as a driveway or street, instead of a garage).
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Nick Kordich
          The resulting trunk doesn't look ample to me. I don't get what's up with these companies. I agree with you about why people will buy it. HOV lane access. Hopefully they'll also then decide to start plugging it in and then decide to get a vehicle that is more of an EREV (or EV) next time they purchase a car.
        paulwesterberg
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        Once you go hatch you don't go back.
        Austin Too
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        Autoblog published a picture earlier here: http://www.autoblog.com/photos/2014-honda-accord-plug-in-hybrid-first-drive/#photo-5333701 Room for some grocery bags, but not luggage for serious family touring. I suspect the Fusion Energi will look similar, but I haven't seen any pics yet.
      PeterScott
      • 2 Years Ago
      Makes the Volt look like the real deal of the field, with up to triple the EV range than it's competition.
        Jason
        • 2 Years Ago
        @PeterScott
        Agreed, thats why I just bought a Volt...I waited for the competition to respond before buying a PHEV and they all did with half the range. 118 eMPG doesn't do me a bit of good when generally I drive 30+ miles a day in a sprawling city and would need to burn gas every day with the competition. Once you get into the gas tank, 118 eMPG doesn't mean a thing.
      Bill Fracalossi
      • 2 Years Ago
      The excitement builds! Add in Spark, the Cadillac Voltec offering, and the more Mainstream looking Accord and Fusion, the Honda CNG Civic, and we might have enough of these running around to be past the Tipping Point. I can hear the OPEC nations sniffling. Sure is an exciting time to be watching the auto industry!
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