The Chevrolet Volt has done the double, nearly replicating its triumph from last year: For its annual Owner Satisfaction Survey, the Consumer Reports National Research Center asked Consumer Reports readers, "Considering all factors (price, performance, reliability, comfort, enjoyment, etc.), would you get this car if you had it to do all over again?" Ninety-two percent of Volt owners answered "Definitely yes," topping nearly 250 other models for which responses were received. The only difference between this year and last is that in 2011, the Volt won the title thanks to 93 percent of its owners.

Other fuel sippers earning garlands were the Toyota Camry Hybrid, Toyota Prius and Prius C, and the Nissan Leaf. The sports category also had some repeat play in the top spots, last year's twosome of the Porsche 911 and V8 Dodge Challenger were second and third, joined by the Chevrolet Corvette and Ford Mustang. The luxury segment was led by the Audi A7, Lexus GS and Audi A6.

Conversely, those stuck in the dog shed out back were fronted by the Nissan Versa, the only car to register a score lower than 50 percent. It didn't lack for company, sharing its plot of dirt with the V6-powered twins the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra pickups, the Nissan Armada, Suzuki SX4 and Mitsubishi Outlander SUVs.

There's a press release below with more information. Condensed results are available to anyone on the Consumer Reports site, the complete results viewable online for subscribers and in the January issue.
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CHEVROLET VOLT TOPS CONSUMER REPORTS' OWNER-SATISFACTION SURVEY FOR SECOND STRAIGHT YEAR
Top-ranked cars feature great fuel economy, a fun driving experience and luxurious surroundings


YONKERS, NY, November 29, 2012 - Would you get the same vehicle if you had to do it all over again? That's the single, revealing question the Consumer Reports National Research Center asked subscribers in its annual Owner -Satisfaction survey-and the answer for Chevrolet Volt owners was a resounding "yes."

Ninety-two percent of respondents who own the Volt said they would definitely buy it again, earning the car the distinction of being the top-scoring model in the Consumer Reports survey for the second year in a row.

"The Volt's two-year reign at the top of our satisfaction survey points to the continuing trend of owners' enthusiasm for cars that are fuel-efficient cars, especially as we see more and more hybrid and electric models hitting the market." said Consumer Reports' Auto Editor Rik Paul. "The combination of sporty handling and strong engine performance also goes a long way in building loyalty and generating excitement among owners."

The full report on Consumer Reports' owner satisfaction survey findings is available at ConsumerReports.org and in the January issue of Consumer Reports.

In addition to the Volt, other fuel-efficient models that scored among the best were the Toyota Camry Hybrid, Prius, and Prius C, and Nissan Leaf.

The Chevrolet Corvette, Porsche 911, the V8 Dodge Challenger and Ford Mustang topped the sporty car category while the Audi A7, Lexus GS and Audi A6 were the leading luxury cars.

On the other end of the spectrum, the redesigned subcompact Nissan Versa Sedan came in with the lowest score in the survey, with fewer than half of its owners saying they would definitely buy it again. Other low scorers include the V6 versions of the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra pickups, and the Nissan Armada, Suzuki SX4, and Mitsubishi Outlander SUVs.

One of the features that didn't seem to have a strong effect on owner satisfaction was brand nationality. The 44 top-rated models include 16 American, 14 Asian and 14 European vehicles.

While owner satisfaction can be a helpful indicator when choosing a vehicle, Consumer Reports also advises consulting its road-test results and reliability-survey data before buying. One car that meets all three criteria is the 38-mpg Toyota Camry Hybrid, which CR suggests is the best pick for those who want an all-around sedan with excellent fuel economy.

Consumer Reports received responses on almost 350,000 vehicles and more than 240 models, spanning the 2010 through 2013 model years. The survey is based on the results from Consumer Reports Annual Auto Survey, conducted by the Consumer Reports National Research Center.

Scores are based on the percentage of respondents who answered "definitely yes" to the following question: "Considering all factors (price, performance, reliability, comfort, enjoyment, etc.), would you get this car if you had it to do all over again?"

Consumer Reports is the world's largest independent product-testing organization. Using its more than 50 labs, auto test center, and survey research center, the nonprofit rates thousands of products and services annually. Founded in 1936, Consumer Reports has over 8 million subscribers to its magazine, website and other publications. Its advocacy division, Consumers Union, works for health reform, product safety, financial reform, and other consumer issues in Washington, D.C., the states, and in the marketplace.


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  • 176 Comments
      mikeybyte1
      • 2 Years Ago
      I think one of the many reasons the Volt rates so highly is that it fulfills it's purpose and target market. It was designed for a certain buyer, where the bulk of their commuting could be done on pure electric power and the rest they had the gas engine to fall back on. They know their buyer and their buyer loves the product. There are Volt owner web sites showing elec/gas real world results and they are pretty amazing. So it's not surprising it ranks so highly. Especially in CR of all places. Kudos to GM!
        MTN RANGER
        • 2 Years Ago
        @mikeybyte1
        There is surprising variety to Volt owners as seen on gm-volt.com Some treat the Volt as a BEV and eke out amazing numbers. Others treat it like a hybrid and use electricity when convenient. Still others fall between the extremes. I didn't think so at first, but the Volt has really changed how I think about cars and driving. I would buy another when Volt 2.0 comes out (unless the Fisker Atlantic wins out for me).
      Hazdaz
      • 2 Years Ago
      Good on GM for bringing the Volt out, but now they really have to spread that Voltec out to other vehicles. Sure Cadillac is getting a car based on Volt technology, but not unlike Toyota with its Synergy Drive, a large percent of GM cars should have the option to get a part of the Volt's tech.
      DaveMart
      • 2 Years Ago
      Kudos GM. I was initially very sceptical on several counts, about the complexity and cost of the engineering as well as the degree of GM's commitment. In my view this not only sets the standard for plug-in hybrids, but shows that for the moment at least plug ins sell far better than BEVs. In addition I feel that GM have now out-engineered Nissan for BEV's, in the Spark, as the batteries in that should be good for the life of the car, providing reasonable range throughout. They also have avoided the massive intrusions into passenger and cargo space in the Fords. So well done again GM!
        hodad66
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DaveMart
        I was ready to lease a Leaf. My driving habits are such that 70 miles is more than I normally need. I leased the Volt to get leather instead of cloth and the lease deal. That being said, I have had more than one occasion where I needed to take a trip unexpectedly. With the Leaf I would have been looking for a rental.... with the Volt I simply drove. Love this car!
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DaveMart
        Glad to hear that you are enjoying your Volt, which sounds with your driving pattern more suitable than the Leaf. To clarify, in most climates there is nothing wrong with leasing a Leaf, as the battery capacity should remain high enough for the length of the lease and after that it is Nissan's worry. Now that the facts are in it really makes no sense at all to buy a Leaf in my view, and even a lease does not make sense in hotter areas.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          The Leaf is still only rated for 60,000 miles on the LA4 cycle down to 80% capacity, perhaps 45,000 miles on the EPA cycle. Not only is that not economic, it is way worse than the Smart ED or the Spark EV will do. It is not battery electric cars that are at fault, but Nissan's choice of manganese spinel chemistry and the lack of adequate cooling. Everyone else is engineering batteries to last as long as the car, as for instance Ford say in their manual for the C-Max Energi. I can't confirm that, as I have been unable to locate the capacity loss graphs or even proper information on the Panasonic batteries used, but Smart and GM have both done so, and as far as we know their batteries should last just fine, and perhaps it is likely that the Ford batteries which have active air cooling in the Energi and liquid cooling in the Focus EV will also. Nissan have confirmed that that will not be the case in the Leaf, with large capacity losses and no plans for a cheap replacement battery pack. So I would argue that the Leaf is only 'safe' even in temperate climates as a lease.
      Ben Doolittle
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'm excited for the ELR, do hope it uses the second gen engineering though.
      Mike
      • 2 Years Ago
      Niche car for a niche customer base. "Green" people love to preach to the world that they're green, thats why im sure almost all of them filled out that JD power survey we get in the mail. I didn't bother like most.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Mike
        [blocked]
          Ryan
          • 2 Years Ago
          Or Canadian (tar sands), British (gulf of mexico), Mexican, Venezuelan, Nigerian, Brazilian, or a host of other problems that always come from drilling for hard to get oil.
          Iluvmyvolt
          • 2 Years Ago
          $250 spent for 9000 miles driven is green. As in green sating in my pocket. Your green goes to Saudi Arabia.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        A_Guy
        • 2 Years Ago
        Do you know what the term 'vapor' means, in this sense? ...'cuz you're using it wrong. The Volt exists and has been available to buy for some time (decently, in fact). Vapor, or typically used 'vapor-ware' suggests its all talk, design, and never actually produced. In short: u fail.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @A_Guy
          [blocked]
        GreaseMonkeySRT
        • 2 Years Ago
        Why does anyone EVER bring up economics when discussing vehicle purchases? Why do people buy an Escalade when they can get a Tahoe/Suburban LTZ for $20,000 less? Why buy luxury cars? Why offer cars in different colors? There's an ass for every seat. If people want to buy the Volt because they would rather pay an American company more money than Middle East countries for oil, then so be it. The Volt is damn near a luxury car all in its own. It cannot be compared to an $18,000 econobox. People buy cars knowing that there are more economical choices out there. Everybody wants their own flavor. I currently drive an '09 CTS just to get to work and back, a few road trips, and around town for errands. A $2,000 POS car off a used car lot would easily fulfill all of those tasks, but that's not what I want. WANT is the key word in everything when it comes to vehicle purchases.
        Harry
        • 2 Years Ago
        The median mpg on Voltstats.net is 182 mpg, but that isn't why most people buy the Volt. They buy it because it is a state of the art vehicle that allows you to nearly eliminate gasoline from your life without compromising your ability to drive long distances when you want to. Plus it is simply a ton of fun to drive. The only real drawback for the Volt is that it's MSRP is $10,000 too high this year, but the MSRP is dropping every year and the discounts Chevy is offering are rising. Plus, the $7500 credit eliminates most of the pain of the currently too expensive MSRP.
        mlmatney
        • 2 Years Ago
        Laserbrain... before you call others stupid, look in the mirror. I have a friend that is one of the smartest people I know. He got a Volt on GM's lease program... the money he is saving in gas every single month is basically his lease payment. He is pretty much netting $0 every month driving this wonderful piece of automotive technology. Who's stupid now? If you would stop thinking you know everything and open your mind, you might learn something.
        • 2 Years Ago
        [blocked]
        • 2 Years Ago
        [blocked]
        • 2 Years Ago
        [blocked]
          A_Guy
          • 2 Years Ago
          And you're not a minute too soon.
          • 2 Years Ago
          [blocked]
          Shiftright
          • 2 Years Ago
          You're ugly and your mother dresses you funny...
          Michael Sexton
          • 2 Years Ago
          And it's time to pull the stick out of your______!
        ChaosphereIX
        • 2 Years Ago
        the Volt gets much, much better than 40mpg for the average owner. I am seeing about 110mpg, my mom even better because she has a shorter commute. She hasent used a drop of gas for driving since she bought the thing. The engine actually tells her it needs to burn gas to maintain the system because it has sat in the tank for too long! Very worth the price premium if you ask me. Drive one, do some math, and also realize you are supporting a new wave of automobiles with high development costs.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @ChaosphereIX
          [blocked]
      Scooter
      • 2 Years Ago
      All 25 owners really love it!
        ChaosphereIX
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Scooter
        Volt sales are going way up as of late, October saw a dramatic increase over the previous year. This car is only going to get more and more popular as time goes on.
        Chris M
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Scooter
        You're missing about 3 zeros there. Sales are a lot closer to 25,000 than to 25.
        A_Guy
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Scooter
        Most ignorant comment of all time?
        Tweaker
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Scooter
        Haters gotta hate.
        hodad66
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Scooter
        Guess what..... Obama won too! Kick the FAUX NEWS habit..... ;-)
      gmb88
      • 2 Years Ago
      One little error in the story. It was actually the Smug Self-Satisfaction Survey.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @gmb88
        [blocked]
      design eye
      • 2 Years Ago
      A gem of a product. Can't wait till the Cadillac ERL comes out!
        • 2 Years Ago
        @design eye
        [blocked]
          Dave D
          • 2 Years Ago
          Nobody, Are you mentally or emotionally challenged? Just trying to figure out where to categorize you. If you don't like the car, then don't buy it. Do you run around screaming at people who buy a Porsche, telling them they could have bought 10 Toyota's for the same money? If you don't like a car, then don't buy it. Don't comment on it. Don't nag at others with your quasi-religious ranting.
          Shiftright
          • 2 Years Ago
          This blog is for adults. Glad you're practicing your ABCs but go on back to the little kids'' table now. 'Nobody' is an appropriate handle for you though
          tump
          • 2 Years Ago
          boring comment factory
      GreaseMonkeySRT
      • 2 Years Ago
      These results come from people who are actually driving the car, and driving it daily. Most negative comments all come from those who haven't sat in one or even driven one. I'm a gearhead and horsepower junkie and would have never considered a Volt for daily driving. If I was in the market for a new car, it would be up on the list after having driven one. It's an experience all its own to drive a Volt. It's fun, quiet, handles extremely well, and provides a feeling of acceleration unlike most any other car on the road. If you ever get the opportunity to drive one, don't pass it up. It will completely change your view of the car. Just don't forget to put the drive mode to "Mountain" and then have some fun stomping on the accelerator.
        ChaosphereIX
        • 2 Years Ago
        @GreaseMonkeySRT
        a great way to get the Volt going FAST is to put in Sport mode and "L" on the gear stick. Flies. Mountain works too, ups the throttle tip in and torque curve I think.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        Dave D
        • 2 Years Ago
        You are so full of sh*t. The car will easily recover any investment made in it over the next 10 years as the technology costs are spread across many different vehicles in the GM lineup.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dave D
          [blocked]
          Dean Hammond
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dave D
          agreed Dave...they are going to have to spread the tech, because right now they are taking it in the shorts to get the product out there, but THIS type of good press is the first step to people embracing the tech....
        Grendal
        • 2 Years Ago
        "YOU PEOPLE, the TAXPAYERS, will be stuck with the bill." I noticed that you didn't include yourself as a taxpayer. No surprise there. Living in your mother's basement without a job is a tough place to be. It's gets you a little angry, huh? I'm surprised you can afford the gas for your BMW 7 series. Are you getting a little assistance from the government?
        ChaosphereIX
        • 2 Years Ago
        and what do you drive? I am sure I can pass judgment with the best of them too...
          Grendal
          • 2 Years Ago
          @ChaosphereIX
          He's said before that he drives a BMW 7 series. That could easily be a lie with this troll. He has posted as thor petersen/knodoctor/peter nixon/luigi tony and now nobody23753.
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        Toyota lost money on the Prius for years. The Prius is now the #1 selling car in California.
          Chris M
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Spec
          Only for 6 years, in 2003 they'd paid off the initial development costs and started turning a profit. The first 4 years, 1997 -2000, it was sold only in Japan.
        mycommentemail
        • 2 Years Ago
        I'm going to start a charity. All proceeds will go to fix nodbody23753/thor_peterson's caps lock key. It keeps getting stuck. OR mayBE HE LIkeS TYpinG LIkE thaT?
        • 2 Years Ago
        [blocked]
        gop.hates.america
        • 2 Years Ago
        @nobody23753 Hey, Fox News is looking for ummm smart... and ummm insightful people like you for their fake news shows.
      Jason Krumvieda
      • 2 Years Ago
      Since it got such high scores maybe the tax credit can be cut. If the scores and the sales stay the same then it will be worth it. That seems fair.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jason Krumvieda
        [blocked]
          MTN RANGER
          • 2 Years Ago
          Previous post above this, I thought that was Mr T. for a second. Then I realized it was a troll.
          • 2 Years Ago
          [blocked]
          Jason Krumvieda
          • 2 Years Ago
          Yes. If a car can stand on it's own 4 wheels and manufacturing can keep up and sales goals are hitting their targets then why continue to subsidide them?
        A_Guy
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jason Krumvieda
        You don't like incentives for creating cleaner air and reducing dependency on foreign oil, putting money back in people's pocket? You'd rather tax credits go to oil companies for CEOs to make record profits while still raping you at the pump? oh. that sux.
          Justin
          • 2 Years Ago
          @A_Guy
          Where did he mention supporting oil subsidies? Also if people want to pay more and do what they think is the right thing, then that should be their incentive. Not government taking people's money to pay for someone else's car.
          A_Guy
          • 2 Years Ago
          @A_Guy
          @justin: But they do that with oil subsidies. Where were you then? (you as in...all 'you people' that complain about subsidizing these new car technologies)
        Harry
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jason Krumvieda
        The tax credit is going to start to go after 165,000 Volts more Volts are sold. That might be in 4 years or it might be in 3 years. If the price drops a good bit over the next year, we could see the 200,000th Volt sold by mid-2015. Then the tax credit gets cut in half, then half again and then it goes away. By then the Volt and other Voltec cars will be much less expensive to build and the credit won't be needed. Eliminating the credit before the economies of scale fully kick in would be silly. The tax credits are why the car was built. Eliminating them because the car is great before the credits do all the job they were intended to do would not be a very good idea.
        Justin
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jason Krumvieda
        Not sure why Jason was voted down. If the car is good, people will pay the full price. If they won't, then don't make me pay for it.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jason Krumvieda
        [blocked]
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