Kelley Blue Book announced its annual Best Resale Value Award winners, and we weren't too surprised to see the list dominated by Japanese automakers – mainly Toyota and Honda. KBB hands out the awards based on the projected residual value of mostly all 2013 model year vehicles, and Toyota skated home with a number of awards including 10 of the 22 overall categories and having five of its products in the top 10 for models with best resale value. KBB's Best Resale Value Awards were announced in the same week as the ALG Residual Value Awards, and there were many similarities between both lists, especially when it came to Toyota.

To come up with its winners, KBB measures depreciation over the first five years of ownership, and looks for the cars it expects to hold its value the best after this time; on average, the report says the 2013 model year vehicles will lose 61.8 percent of its value in five years. Of the 22 categories, 15 slots were filled by Toyota, Honda and Nissan products, while the Camaro and Porsche (Cayenne and Panamera) each took home a pair of awards. If Toyota has anything to be upset about in this list of cars, it's that categories for Hybrid/Alternative Energy Car and Electric Vehicle went to the Ford Fusion and Chevrolet Volt, respectively.

The overall top 10 models for the best resale value in 2013 are, in alphabetical order:
Scroll down to see KBB's press release that includes a breakdown of all individual category winners.
Show full PR text

2013 Best Resale Value Award Winners Announced By Kelley Blue Book
KBB.com Offers Advice on Choosing New Cars Predicted to Maintain Value over Five-Year Ownership Period


IRVINE, Calif., Nov. 26, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The 2013 model-year vehicle winners of the annual Best Resale Value Awards, recognizing current and forthcoming vehicles for their projected retained value throughout the initial five-year ownership period, were announced today by Kelley Blue Book, www.kbb.com, the leading provider of new and used car information. Since depreciation (or loss of value) is typically a car buyer's primary expense during ownership, these awards, like all of KBB.com's new and used vehicle information, are designed to help consumers make more informed car-buying decisions.

Kelley Blue Book's Best Resale Value Awards are based on projections from the Kelley Blue Book® Official Residual Value Guide, determined by a skilled staff of automotive analysts. These prestigious awards honor vehicles expected to maintain the greatest proportion of their original Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) after five years of ownership. Low-volume vehicles and vehicles with a MSRP of more than $60,000 are excluded from award consideration, except in the luxury and high-performance categories.

2013 BEST RESALE VALUE: BRAND

TOYOTA

2013 BEST RESALE VALUE: LUXURY BRAND

LEXUS


2013 BEST RESALE VALUE: BY VEHICLE CATEGORY

SUBCOMPACT CAR: Honda Fit

COMPACT SUV/CROSSOVER: Jeep Wrangler

COMPACT CAR: Honda Civic

MID-SIZE SUV/CROSSOVER: Toyota FJ Cruiser

SPORTY COMPACT CAR: Honda Civic Si

FULL-SIZE SUV/CROSSOVER: Toyota Sequoia

MID-SIZE CAR: Honda Accord

LUXURY COMPACT SUV/CROSSOVER: Infiniti EX

FULL-SIZE CAR: Toyota Avalon

LUXURY MID-SIZE SUV/CROSSOVER: Porsche Cayenne

ENTRY-LEVEL LUXURY CAR: Lexus IS

LUXURY FULL-SIZE SUV/CROSSOVER: Lexus LX

LUXURY CAR: Lexus GS 350

MID-SIZE PICKUP TRUCK: Toyota Tacoma

HIGH-END LUXURY CAR: Porsche Panamera

FULL-SIZE PICKUP TRUCK: Toyota Tundra

SPORTS CAR: Chevrolet Camaro V6

MINIVAN/VAN: Toyota Sienna

HIGH-PERFORMANCE CAR: Chevrolet Camaro SS

HYBRID SUV/CROSSOVER: Lexus RX 450h

HYBRID/ALTERNATIVE ENERGY CAR: Ford Fusion

ELECTRIC VEHICLE: Chevrolet Volt


2013 BEST RESALE VALUE: TOP 10 CARS

-Honda Civic
-Scion tC
-Honda CR-V
-Toyota FJ Cruiser
-Jeep Wrangler
-Toyota Land Cruiser
-Lexus LX
-Toyota Tacoma
-Porsche Cayenne
-Toyota 4Runner

(Residual values used for award calculations are based on the November/December 2012 Kelley Blue Book® Residual Value Guide. Top 10 models appear in alphabetical order).


While most car buyers today consider sticker price one of the most significant numbers when choosing a new vehicle, the editors at Kelley Blue Book's KBB.com recommend that shoppers consider a number they won't find on any window sticker: the resale value. Depreciation often is the greatest expense incurred by drivers during the first five years of vehicle ownership. An average 2013 model-year vehicle only will retain about 38.2 percent of its original value after a five-year ownership period, meaning that a $50,000 new car today will only be worth somewhere close to $19,100 after five years. Vehicles with average or below-average resale values are generally plentiful in the marketplace and easy to find. But certain vehicles are projected to hold their value better than others. While much of a vehicle's resale value is based on supply and demand, as well as current and projected future market conditions, vehicles that retain their value best are rarely discounted and tend to generate high levels of consumer interest.

"The competition for Best Resale Value within many segments has become very heated in the last few years, as major vehicle redesigns and new model introductions have challenged the traditional favorites," said Eric Ibara, director of residual consulting for Kelley Blue Book. "However, for the second year in a row, Toyota and Lexus retain the top Best Resale Value ranking for both non-luxury and luxury brands, based on the average 60-month residual value across all models in each brands' respective lineup. Combined, there is an impressive total of 12 Toyota and Lexus models bringing home 2013 Kelley Blue Book Best Resale Value Awards this year; half of the Top 10 models with Best Resale Value for 2013 hail from either Toyota or Lexus."

Vehicle shoppers should take several factors into consideration when buying a new car to ensure as much future value as possible. Just because a car is expensive or from a luxury brand does not necessarily mean it will hold its value better than an inexpensive car down the road. In fact, because resale values are calculated as a percent of original MSRP, an expensive vehicle has to command a relatively high price later as a used car to maintain its residual value. For example, a $60,000 vehicle has to be worth $21,000 five years later to have a residual value of 35 percent. At this price point, not only will it compete with other used luxury vehicles, but it also will compete with some new vehicles in the marketplace. Meanwhile, an $18,000 new vehicle only needs to be worth $6,300 five years later to have the same 35 percent residual value, and at that price point it will not compete with new vehicles.

"Getting the most for your money means knowing what your car will be worth when you sell it, not just what it's worth when you buy it," said Jack Nerad, executive editorial director and executive market analyst for Kelley Blue Book's KBB.com. "Vehicle depreciation is a new-car buyer's biggest expense, yet many shoppers don't realize that resale value information is available for free on Kelley Blue Book's KBB.com. Taking the time to research and wisely choose vehicle makes, models and options now can help new-car shoppers get as much money as possible when they sell or trade-in the vehicle in the future."

In addition, most options and packages added to a vehicle do not necessarily increase its resale value. However, there are exceptions to the rule, such as a high-performance engine or a performance package in a sports car. Finally, regional preferences can significantly impact the value of a vehicle. In the colder sections of the country, a two-wheel drive vehicle's resale value will not be as high as a four-wheel or all-wheel drive option of that same model. At the other end of the thermometer, in warmer climates black (or dark-colored) cars will not have as high resale value as they could command in other regions.

While the company's Residual Value Guide has been published since 1982, Kelley Blue Book established its annual Best Resale Value Awards in 2003. Kelley Blue Book reports projections based on current vehicle data, relevant auction transactions, sales data, market conditions for each vehicle, competition within vehicle segments, expectations of the future economy and the combined experience of Kelley Blue Book's residual analysts. Residual values reflect projected future auction values for vehicles in average condition with 75,000 miles at the end of a five-year lease or ownership period. Kelley Blue Book's residual values are used by manufacturers, banks, financial institutions, and the automotive leasing industry.

For more information about Kelley Blue Book's Best Resale Value Awards, please visit http://www.kbb.com/new-cars/best-resale-value-awards-2013/.

For more information and news from Kelley Blue Book's KBB.com, visit www.kbb.com/media/, follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/kelleybluebook (or @kelleybluebook), like our page on Facebook at www.facebook.com/kbb, and get updates on Google+ at https://plus.google.com/+kbb/.

About Kelley Blue Book (www.kbb.com)
Founded in 1926, Kelley Blue Book, The Trusted Resource®, is the only vehicle valuation and information source trusted and relied upon by both consumers and the industry. Each week the company provides the most market-reflective values in the industry on its top-rated website www.kbb.com, including its famous Blue Book® Trade-In and Suggested Retail Values and Fair Purchase Price, which reports what others are paying for new cars this week. The company also provides vehicle pricing and values through various products and services available to car dealers, auto manufacturers, finance and insurance companies as well as governmental agencies. KBB.com provides consumer pricing and information on cars for sale, minivans, pickup trucks, sedan, hybrids, electric cars, and SUVs. Kelley Blue Book's KBB.com ranked highest in its category for brand equity and was named Online Auto Shopping Brand of the Year by the 2012 Harris Poll EquiTrend® study. Kelley Blue Book Co. Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of AutoTrader Group.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 37 Comments
      Andre Neves
      • 2 Years Ago
      And the Wrangler should be #1 on that list. BTW, with all the recent recalls and issues Toyota has has in the past couple years, how the heck do they have so many cars on that list!? FJ Cruiser? What?
        PICKLEBOY
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Andre Neves
        You do realize that most car manufacturers have recalls constantly. Not all of them are reported or big news. GM and Ford and many other companies have had their fair share of recalls, some even more than Toyota
          Andre Neves
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PICKLEBOY
          ....I would assume that something like that would hurt the resale value of a car. I dunno, just a guess.
          Andre Neves
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PICKLEBOY
          It's one thing to have a recall for a faulty sensor or latch, it's another thing to have them for rusted subframes. http://www.toyota-4runner.org/attachments/3rd-gen-t4rs/50074d1315530498-picture-4runner-rust-check-your-frames-4runnerrust2.jpg
          404 not found
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PICKLEBOY
          What does it matter what the recall is for as long as it gets fixed?
        luigi.tony
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Andre Neves
        Andre, do you want me to start a list of recent Jeep recalls for faulty airbags, skidplate fires, gas tank explosions...?
        Donny Hoover
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Andre Neves
        I know Jeeps have ridiculous resale value but you seem clueless on FJ Cruisers. Similar vehicle, similar cult following, also holds value well. Here's two I just found on craigslist and they're even private party so they could be even more expensive: A 2004 with 82,000 miles: $24,500 A 2007 with 45,000 miles: $22,500 Its at the point where you'd have to be a total moron to buy a used one. That's within a couple thousand of what they paid for them new.
      Jack Holliday
      • 2 Years Ago
      these magazines are all paid off by jap car makers ...........especially CR
        Henry
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jack Holliday
        I hate to break it to you. KBB numbers are based on what you and I and every other Joe Blow or Jane Flow will pay for the cars if we are in the market to buy one. So there is no subjectivity there. And most of those buyers who made them what they have become are Americans like you and I.
        Worx2749
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jack Holliday
        Stupido.
        M5_4_life
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jack Holliday
        I know! And I'm taking your word for it since you're an authority on such issues!
      RodRAEG
      • 2 Years Ago
      Resale isimportant for a car you don't plan on keeping.
        mbukukanyau
        • 2 Years Ago
        @RodRAEG
        Exactly
        Henry
        • 2 Years Ago
        @RodRAEG
        Not really. If you like driving new cars every 3 to 5 years, it makes a whole lot of sense. There are a lot of people out there that don't want to drive anything more than 5 years old.
      mbukukanyau
      • 2 Years Ago
      Good for me, since I have no interest in Toyotas, I can pay less for cars I like
        zoom_zoom_zoom
        • 2 Years Ago
        @mbukukanyau
        I recommend a Chrysler or Dodge. Get a used rental version. Very cheap.
      bubciak
      • 2 Years Ago
      Resale value :)) such a BS.
      rL-gT
      • 2 Years Ago
      In before the Hate comments
        You missed it
        • 2 Years Ago
        @rL-gT
        And? How is your stupid "in before..." comment supposed to stop anybody from posting hate comments?
          rL-gT
          • 2 Years Ago
          @You missed it
          Just a useless comment like the other random hate comments in this thread. get it now?
          You missed it
          • 2 Years Ago
          @You missed it
          You are welcome. But seriously, what is the point of such comment? Seems just as dumb as those "First!!!" comments.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      zoom_zoom_zoom
      • 2 Years Ago
      Resale value is important also when your car is totaled. I once had a car for only 6 months, a lady ran a stop light and totaled my new car. Thankful I drove a Japanese car that didn't lose any valueand the insurance paid off the loan plus some.
      L14t
      • 2 Years Ago
      I was talking to a friend the other day about cars. He is the type of person who thinks ford-is-the-best-brand-EVER guy. He absolutely adores early 00's mustangs. He said my miata wouldn't be as reliable as his ford. I told him Japanese cars are more reliable than American cars. But ford is the most reliable brand there ever is he said. I would like to show him this list as a slap in the face. And every other reliability list ever made. I have nothing against ford (I drool over the fusion) but people like that make me lose respect for that brand because of their arrogance
        Dean
        • 2 Years Ago
        @L14t
        I wouldn't lose respect for the brand because of someone like your friend. I would however lose respect for your friend for being so narrow minded. Ford isn't my brand of choice, but I will admit, they have introduced some great cars recently.
        mbukukanyau
        • 2 Years Ago
        @L14t
        The Japanese can keep their reliable cars.
          zoom_zoom_zoom
          • 2 Years Ago
          @mbukukanyau
          And the UAW can go pound sand and go out of business.
      PICKLEBOY
      • 2 Years Ago
      No surprise. I had a 1991 Toyota Corolla for my first car and it ran perfectly during the two years I owned it. Never had to take it to a shop, always started easily. Toyota definitely makes a reliable car that in turn gives great resale value. It was totaled and I got 2000 bucks from my insurance. It was 21 years old! try getting that kind of cash for any other brand car of that age
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Agilis
      • 2 Years Ago
      List is total nonsense. Honda Fit at most with almost every option is just under 24K. So of course the depreciation of this vehicle is going to be low, it's cheap to begin with.
        piggybox
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Agilis
        Cheap = low depreciation? Sorry, your logic is a total nonsense.
          Agilis
          • 2 Years Ago
          @piggybox
          No. I never said it was cheap. By no means is a Honda Fit cheap. I simply meant that the lower base price just means there is very little room to depreciate. A vehicle that is 25K is not going to, after 5 years, be worth 8K. Dealers would find it very difficult to sell otherwise.
          Agilis
          • 2 Years Ago
          @piggybox
          My mistake, I did say cheap. I was talking about the price, not the car's value. Not the best choice of words.
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