Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost front three-quarter
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost front three-quarter
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost front three-quarter

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost front
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost front

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost side profile
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost side profile

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost rear
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost rear

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost headlight
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost headlight

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost wheel
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost wheel

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost mirror
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost  mirror

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost badge
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost badge

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost econetic badge
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost econetic badge

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

There's an analogy to diesel engines hiding in the new Ford Fiesta with the 1.0-liter EcoBoost powerplant. There's still a segment of the population that has bad memories of diesel engines, and that makes it harder for Audi or Volkswagen to sell their new clean diesels in the US today. Not impossible, but more of a challenge than it needs to be. In the same way, ask any car geek if they've had good experiences with three-cylinder engines, and the response is likely to be a flashback to a bad ride in a Geo Metro.

But, if no one were to tell you that the new Fiesta 1.0-liter EcoBoost is rocking three cylinders, you'd probably be hard pressed to notice. The engine has already found a home in the Ford Focus (read our Quick Spin) and, after driving about 100 miles around Los Angeles and the Malibu hills in a Euro-spec Fiesta equipped with one, we can safely say that this is a solid B-segment car – one that happens to get over 40 miles per gallon (city) without a hybrid powertrain. Here's what we learned about the car and Ford's plans to bring it to the US.

Driving Notes
  • The Fiesta with a 1.0-liter EcoBoost engine is already on sale in Europe, and will come to the US in about a year, in late 2013. There will be a few little changes (the Econetic badges will be replaced with the EcoBoost wording that we have here) and what we think is a big one. Specifically, auto start-stop, which is available on the European model, will not be an option for Americans. The reason, we were told, is that B-segment customers are extremely price sensitive, and spending a few hundred extra bucks on this technology – which the EPA tests still don't quite understand – is something Ford doesn't expect them to do. There is still a chance this will change, though.
  • Still, at an estimated 40+ mpg, this flavor of the Fiesta will likely be the "most fuel-efficient, non-hybrid vehicle sold in North America." The current high-mileage Fiesta SFE model gets 40 on the highway (and 33 combined, 29 city). Ford is not talking about combined or city mpg estimates for the new Fiesta just yet.
  • It bears repeating that you do not feel that this is a shaky three-cylinder engine. The power – 123 horses – is there when you want it, with plenty of low-end torque. Some people on our drive were bothered by noise from the high-speed turbocharger that spins up to 248,000 rpm "almost instantaneously," but this is not enough to detract many points from the overall package.
  • Also, since a three-cylinder engine is inherently imbalanced, Ford optimized the engine mounts and made other adjustments to decouple engine shaking forces for "extreme smoothness." It worked.
  • For shorter people, the low placement of the side mirrors, especially on the passenger side, might be a problem. I'm about 5'9", and it was fine, but my co-pilot on this drive was a few inches shorter and she could not easily use the mirrors. They do sit awfully low, as you can see here.
  • Going around tight corners, the Fiesta 1.0-liter EcoBoost feels a heckuva lot better than the Honda Fit in the same situation, but we found it roughly the same as the new Chevrolet Spark, two vehicles it will compete against for frugal-minded city drivers.
  • Some of the other ways the new Fiesta will try to set itself apart is the big "40+ mpg!" sign that's sure to be emblazoned all over the dealership, the connectivity of Sync and MyFordTouch (with a new, 6.5-inch touch screen) and Sony HD radio.
  • Jim Farley, executive vice president of global marketing, sales, service and Lincoln, said the new Fiesta is part of Ford's new high-mpg line-up, making fuel economy a reason to buy a Ford. It used to be, he said, "when people thought fuel economy, they did not think of Ford. We have made a tremendous amount of progress in the last few years of changing that perception."
Put all this together and you've got a compelling "smaller is better" package that we need more details on to properly assess (price is a big one). For years, people have been asking for the Euro-spec Fiesta in the US. Well, we're going to get it, start-stop excluded.

Fiesta Engine Animation.Mov

Show full PR text
Ford 1.0-Liter EcoBoost Engine Sets the Standard for Smoothness and Quietness in Small Engines

Innovative engine mounts, flywheel and pulley in the new 1.0-liter Ford EcoBoost® engine combine to dramatically reduce the vibrations that are inherent in three-cylinder engines

Super-stiff block, isolated fuel injectors and oil-immersed timing belts help make 1.0-liter EcoBoost engine one of Ford's quietest engines

1.0-liter EcoBoost engine debuts in North America in the redesigned 2014 Ford Fiesta

For more information, visit the 2014 Ford Fiesta Press Kit.

LOS ANGELES, Nov. 26, 2012 – Start up Ford's patented new 1.0-liter three-cylinder EcoBoost® engine and chances are you'll have to look at the tachometer to verify that the engine is running.

Ford engineers always knew they could build a powerful, fuel-efficient three-cylinder engine. The real engineering magic would be solving the problem that has often sunk previous three-cylinder automobile engines – conquering the unpleasant vibrations that come from having an odd number of cylinders under the hood.

For Ford's new three-cylinder engine to be successful, it would have to be a no-compromise engine. It could not force customers to choose between performance versus economy or responsiveness versus smoothness. It had to deliver it all and it had to be affordable.

The traditional way of reducing shaking forces in small-displacement engines is to install a counter-rotating balance shaft inside the motor that cancels out most vibrations. But the problem with a balance shaft, explains Andy Delicata, Ford of Europe manager of Powertrain Noise, Vibration and Harshness, is that it is heavy, expensive, and it reduces fuel economy.

The 1.0-liter's NVH engineering team, led by Delicata at Ford Technical Centres in Dunton and Dagenham, England, attacked the problem by focusing on two areas – the engine's front pulley and rear flywheel, and the mounting system that connects the powertrain with the car's body.

The pulley and flywheel are unbalanced with weights that are placed precisely to counteract the natural shaking forces of the engine and drive the energy in a less sensitive direction. The engine mounts are designed to decouple as well as absorb the engine's shaking forces, Delicata explained.

The result is one of the smoothest and quietest engines in Ford's global lineup. "We like to compare the refinement of the 1.0-liter EcoBoost engine with what you would typically experience in a vehicle two or three classes up from Fiesta and Focus," said Delicata.

The smoothness of the engine is complemented by class-leading quietness. Engineers in Dunton and Dagenham attacked engine noise at its many sources.

For instance, a super-compact, highly stiff cast-iron block structure and an integrated engine mounting bracket are crucial in absorbing noise energy. In addition to immersing the engine's toothed rubber timing belts in oil, isolated fuel injectors electronically controlled for soft landing and a foam-covered engine collectively help keep noise and vibration from reaching the driver.

The 1.0-liter EcoBoost engine is off to a fast start in Europe. Since its launch in March in the Focus, the 1.0-liter EcoBoost engine has won four major international awards. In the Focus, the 1.0-liter engine accounts for about 30 percent of sales, no small feat in a part of the world where the diesel engine is king.

The 1.0-liter is just now launching in B-MAX and C-MAX, and will be available in North America next year in the redesigned 2014 Ford Fiesta.

# # #

About Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company, a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles across six continents. With about 172,000 employees and 65 plants worldwide, the company's automotive brands include Ford and Lincoln. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford and its products worldwide, please visit http://corporate.ford.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 103 Comments
      justgoawaymad
      • 2 Years Ago
      I own 11 cars and trucks. My daily driver to work is STILL a 91 geo metro. I have tweeked it up to 58 mpg. And NO pulse glide b/s. Funny how everytime gas goes up someone offers to buy my little metro.
      spanky
      • 2 Years Ago
      No pictures under the hood? C'mon guys!
        • 2 Years Ago
        @spanky
        [blocked]
        Gordon Chen
        • 2 Years Ago
        @spanky
        I want interior pictures too!
        AM2
        • 2 Years Ago
        @spanky
        Under the hood of a Fiesta 1.0 EcoBoost from other sources: http://strumors.automobilemag.com/files/2012/11/2014-Ford-Fiesta-with-EcoBoost-623x465.jpg http://blog.caranddriver.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Engine-bay-of-a-Euro-market-Ford-Fiesta-with-1.0L-EcoBoost-engine.jpg
      thequebecerinfrance
      • 2 Years Ago
      This is the first I could see myself in a Fiesta. But the truth I would really want that ST. But for city driving those small economical cars are just perfect:nimbre, geart fuel economy and they can park everywhere.
      TPGIII
      • 2 Years Ago
      "...one that happens to get over 40 miles per gallon (city) without a hybrid powertrain." Is this a typo? Did Sebastian experience more than 40 mpg in about 100 miles city driving? That sound too good to be true. Ford has claimed it would be rated the best of any non-hybrid. I figured that meant either more than 42 highway, or more than 36 city, or more than 37 combined. I think those are the current bests, and usually being better in just one number is enough for a manufacture to claim best. Ford, please bring stop/start to the US!
      Chris
      • 2 Years Ago
      I was just getting ready to write a check for a deposit on a new Fiesta and then read this and the ST stuff! Now I may be compelled to stop and wait a bit...
      Lou
      • 2 Years Ago
      Are that many people with memories of terrible diesel experiences. I mean I'm in my 30s and have only known one person with a diesel passenger vehicle (a truck). So here is my personal diesel experience. I wanted to test drive one. So I searched for weeks for any VW, Audi, or BMW diesel. What was the response I got? "No one wants them, so we don't really stock them, but we had a few and they were sold before they ever made it to the lot, check back in a few months." That sort of seems like a chicken or the egg problem. No one wants them, so we don't have them? Though there have been some special ordered?
        TPGIII
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Lou
        I don't know how many people remember. I had a Peugeot diesel in the late 70s (yes in the US). It was an OK car. My dad later owned several GM diesels. The Olds and his first Chevy truck were the definition of POS. That didn't stop him. He later bought and Isuzu based diesel Chevy truck and loved it. I think it was the only GM product he had that made to 150,000 miles, so it was amazing. I lost interest in diesels. I found they never lived up to the claims on longevity on low maintenance. I've driven a gas engine more than a 1/4 million miles will very little maintenance and got more than 40 mpg in good weather to the end, and it only ended because someone hit it from behind. I wouldn't take a diesel, not because of reliability concerns. In my experience gas engines last far longer than I keep a car, and they are much cheaper to buy and maintain. Maybe it's a volume thing, but when I had a diesel I paid more for everything, filters, oil, any service, and now the fuel is more too.
      Martin
      • 2 Years Ago
      Still can't figure out why I can't buy a Focus with a 1.6 E.B. in America. It's the perfect combination of power and fuel economy. Also why has America turned it's back on small trucks? Bring back the freakin' Ranger!
      Nathan Carl Lewis
      • 2 Years Ago
      I welcome the little 1.0 turbo motor. But I seriously don't get the hype... Rewind back to 1987 when the grand father of the Geo Metro (a suzuki swift/cultus to the rest of the world) the Chevy Sprint (just a Mark 1 Suzuki Cultus/switf if you will) got a little upgrade to its 1.0 3 cylinder. Enter the Turbo Sprint. 1600 lbs hatch back with its little SOHC 3 singing out 70 hp and over 100 lbs/ft of torque. The little car was economical, had decent acceleration, and could fit 4 adults. ( while if in the back seats maybe not for long depending on your height). Fuel mileage was also over 40mpg! Now aside from some old school promoting, I currently own one of these rare little gems with over 140k on the clock. Turbo spools up great still and it pulls quite quite hard. All the while I have actually managed to get 52 mpg on a trip back from the North Carolina mountains to Cape May, New Jersey. So I welcome the new Fiesta. And although I know my car with kill me with out all the modern day advances in saftey tech in cars, I still love my little car, and to that note, dont understand the big hype around fords 1.0 3 banger? Its been done before, well over 26 years ago. And I say that because they did have a carbureted non inter-cooled turbo 3 for the japan only Turbo Suzuki Cultus years before we got our sprint here.
        Brodz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Nathan Carl Lewis
        Yes but cars are getting heavier because they have to meet ever necessary safety standards. So to be able to achieve good power and torque from a small three cylinder, and drive-ability in this day and age, this is still a remarkable thing. Maybe even more so.
          Nathan Carl Lewis
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Brodz
          How much power and torque an engine makes regardless of the car has nothing to do with the sheer weight of the vehicle it is being plopped in. So in all reality its not that remarkable. I myself could add an extra thousand pounds to my Sprint and easy make more power with simple modifications, and drive-ability and fuel mileage wouldn't really be compromised. How efficient and how much power an engine makes is all about how you tune it from the factory. If the sprint were heavier back in 87, it would of had more power. So really? This is similar to the music industry who like to take old songs and beats people forgot about or barely hear much any more, and re-purposing them and calling it NEW with a flashy new name "Eco Boost"... I mean whats next? Using the same direct fuel injection tech in a NEW 2 stroke motor for cars that was developed by a motorbike company? OH WOWEE! But its revolutionary! and... done before. Just my two cents...
      Ron McCord
      • 2 Years Ago
      I live in Colombia and have been driving a mazda 2 for 4 years. This fiesta has 23 more hp and more torque and more gears. The rest of the world makes due with 100hp or less, America use to live with this hp in the 80s. It is so funny how Americans crave hp, more and more and yet you cant use it. There are speed limits and stoplights. The Ford Fiesta is sufficient car for 90% of the worlds population in urban areas. I would happily purchase the 2013 with 3 cylinders should I move back to the Usa, but with perfect weather where I live and 650 dollars rent for a 3 story house, that wont be anytime soon.
        MONTEGOD7SS
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ron McCord
        Substitute "European" for each time you said American in that post and it would still be right.
        domingorobusto
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ron McCord
        Americans used to live with that kind of power in the 80's because cars that had that kind of power were all well under a ton. These days the Fiesta is one of the lightest cars you can buy and it's 2500 lbs. Yeah, the little CRX HF I used to have was a hoot with a raging 70 hp. It also only weighed 1700 lbs. The model bloat that has become so endemic demands a greater level of power to maintain an acceptable power to weight ratio. Anything with a power to weight ratio of greater (greater is worse) than 20lbs/hp is getting to be dangerously slow. That means that a for a 2500 lb car, 120 hp is about right, exactly what the Fiesta has. And the Mazda2 is dangerously slow on American roads. I have driven one, and it flat doesn't have enough power to safely make a passing maneuver on a 2 lane road, unless you literally have a clear half-mile or greater. And, a slightly overpowered car will ALWAYS be more efficient than an underpowered one, because the engine doesn't have to work nearly as hard, and you can run the engine in a more efficient rpm range rather than having to wring its neck to get anywhere. This is why the Mazda2 is significantly less efficient than the heavier and more powerful Fiesta.
        Brody
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ron McCord
        Wealth, image, low gas prices are the reason why unnecessary HP has been climbing.
        Shiftright
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ron McCord
        Yup, welcome to America.
        Cayman
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ron McCord
        We also used to make due with 20hp cars. But I certainly can use the extra hp. Sure, we do have speed limits, but we don't have acceleration limits.
      Kurt
      • 2 Years Ago
      I am an American, and I truely do want a light car with a small engine and great efficiency. Thank you Ford
      ocnblu
      • 2 Years Ago
      P.S. - where in the heck is the 3-door? This is an unfair situation for Americans, Ford's HOME COUNTRY, and we can't get the best of everything. Shame.
        Fixitfixitstop
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ocnblu
        I have a 3-door hatch, and almost every day I wish it was a 5-door. The weight difference is negligible. I don't understand where all these 3-door, 2-door people come from. There isn't that much of a market for those configurations because they are simply not that practical.
      Taint
      • 2 Years Ago
      They won't talk about city mpg estimates because it won't be that good.
        Shiftright
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Taint
        Always has to be a hater in the audience
        2 wheeled menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Taint
        Yeah, i'm sure the city fuel economy on a 1 liter engine is gonna be awful.. lol.
        Cayman
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Taint
        I think they did talk about city mpg: "after driving about 100 miles around Los Angeles and the Malibu hills in a Euro-spec Fiesta equipped with one, we can safely say that this is a solid B-segment car – one that happens to get over 40 miles per gallon (city) without a hybrid powertrain"
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