Who ever thought we'd hear this said about a sports car: "If we made this a diesel hybrid it could be a hot-seller." Yeah. Never. Nevertheless, that's what Audi R&D chief Wolfgang Durheimer told Auto Express about a his idea for a supercar to sit above the R8 and bang carbon-fiber fenders with the McLaren P1, Ferrari F70 and Porsche 918.

Durheimer's quest, in his double life as not just R&D director but also Volkswagen's head of motorsport, is to create a more obvious and lucrative connection between an Audi road car and the automaker's 24 Hours of Le Mans victories with diesel-powered racers. It's pure speculation after that, but Auto Express distills particulars down to at least 700 horsepower and 737 foot-pounds of torque, terminal velocity beyond 200 mph, and construction using either a bespoke carbon fiber tub or the coming MSB platform planned for all mid- and rear-engined VW-Group models. Figure a 2017 due date at the earliest.

Durheimer said his team will soon to decide the top three priorities for the future. If this diesel hybrid supercar gets the nod, it would be the antipodean twin of another possible Audi that Durheimer spoke of to Autocar, a 235-mpg city car based on the A1.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 19 Comments
      Michael Sexton
      • 2 Years Ago
      Won't this car rival the 918?
        Teddy
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Michael Sexton
        Read the article.
        Michael Sexton
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Michael Sexton
        I did, it said banging fenders with the 918. So they are going to build a car to rival their own. Smart...
      airchompers
      • 2 Years Ago
      It'd be nice of the Volkswagen group decided to compete on quality. Take a 100 Corollas and 100 of any car that VAG produces, give them to two hundred Americans who just want basic transportation, and I bet dollars to doughnuts that the Corollas will last longer than VAG products.
        Carlos Cruz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @airchompers
        Depends. Sure a Toyota's engine may run for ever while the VW would need some service. However, people buying new cars don't really care if that Jetta they're buying will require a little more TLC than a Toyota 15 years after the purchase has been made. I bought a GTI last May and it is as dependable as any other car in the same segment, and it will be for the next 5-8 years. As with any other car however, things will wear out and the car will begin to fall appart at 150k. Is this surprising? Hardly. Sure my '08 R32 and '08 GLI were more reliable than my '00 Jetta. However my '00 Jetta was over 100k and only small things gave headaches, it didn't leave me on the side of the road. The real difference comes to material quality, fit & finish, and driving dynamics. Does anyone enjoy driving their Corolla Type S, probably not. How about a comparably equipped, entry GLI? Yes. Not only does a VW usually looks better inside, but the inside is made of better and richer materials than a Toyota or Honda. Not only that, but is also drives better. So at the end of the day, the only people that care if your car can make it to hell and back at 250k and don't need any TLC are the 3rd and 4th owners of the car, not those that buy the car when new.
          Carlos Cruz
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Carlos Cruz
          @airchompers I'm not implying that creating a longer lasting VW will require them to manufacture appliances. I feel like in AB however, people tend to paint this picture of VW as an unreliable, will never leave the service bay POS. VW has worked on this and I can say that minor problems with my cars has gone down. I purchased new VWs in 2009 and 2012 and minor problems that would plage a new car went from minor to almost non-existent on the 2012 model. I do agree that the VW's materials and workmanship have gone down. I did notice however that the average buyer hasn't noticed, only the long time VW fans. I'm not saying this makes it acceptable, but I went to a VW dealership yesterday to show someone a new Jetta and they were impressed by the car, including the interior (I was disappointed by said interior).
          airchompers
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Carlos Cruz
          I don't dispute that VWs drive really well. The VW material advantage is fading as their line up becomes more tailored to America, which is unfortunate. But my whole point is that VAG, with all its resources, should maybe start building cars that hold together a bit longer. A volkswagen at 150k miles is near the end of its life, but take a look at craigslist or ebay and you'll find a huge amount of Camrys, Corollas, Civics, and Accords with 300k+ miles on the original powertrain. These things do matter to some new car buyers, my group of friends and family are all pretty frugal, and all anticipate to drive new cars at least 200,000 miles, all of these buyers would NEVER buy a VW. Perhaps, VAG can flex their engineering muscle and make a car with the VW appeal and higher quality? They're not mutually exclusive and it's closed minded to think that you have to trade driving experience for quality.
          Carlos Cruz
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Carlos Cruz
          @Michael And those people have a ninth gen Civic, Corolla or Cobalt with their name on it.
          Michael Sexton
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Carlos Cruz
          We must remember a lot of people buy cars just for transportation and don't care about how it looks or driving dynamics. They care about mileage and comfort...
        DooMMasteR
        • 2 Years Ago
        @airchompers
        I agree… but the reasons… may be more complex… e.g. why do nearly all car manufacturers in the US ≤10kmiles of oil change intervals, whereas in europe ~15-19kmiles are standard… why does VWs warranty in Europe stay intact… if you service your car on your own (oilchanges, brakepads… other stuff) I think the care and use of the cars is a whole different game… and that is why VW made the US-Versions of Passat and Jetta… again whole different cars… and they seem to sell at least a bit better than their predecessors with European genes
        Drakkon
        • 2 Years Ago
        @airchompers
        Do I get the dollars or doughnuts if you lose?
        mbukukanyau
        • 2 Years Ago
        @airchompers
        Every brand has its strengths. Germans and Americans try to put innovation and soul into their cars. Japan build for the most part appliances, save for some of their models.
          Matt
          • 2 Years Ago
          @mbukukanyau
          The Cavalier or Patriot may not have had soul but Dodge gave the Neon a hell of an attitude. There was the 1st gen ACR and then the 2nd gen had the R/T and the SRT4 which tore up the SCCA and didn't feel like another toaster on the road. Just curious, what expertise does Nissan have with turbocharging? As far as I know Dodge and Audi have been playing with turbos just as long as Nissan has been.
          airchompers
          • 2 Years Ago
          @mbukukanyau
          Pray tell, what soul did GM put in the Cavalier? And Dodge in the Neon? And Jeep in the Patriot? Must have been soul food, each of those cars was heavy in its class, poorly packaged, and were prone to die early (just like most of the people who eat soul food on a regular basis). We can throw around words like "appliance" to describe the Japanese cars, but a huge amount of innovation does come from Japanese companies, it's just kept in luxury cars or it's stuff that's removed from daily operation: things like Honda's ACE safety strategy, Toyota's production system, or Nissan's turbo charging expertise.
      mitytitywhitey
      • 2 Years Ago
      Just diesel the R8 like you originally attempted only a few years ago.
      budwsr25
      • 2 Years Ago
      Why do they keep wasting money on these race cars. They only race them 2 or 3 times then they go away. I thing that Audi would have better things to spend its money on.
      Michael Sexton
      • 2 Years Ago
      The VAG is just making cars that step on their own toes... Like the Porsche 918. How stupid is that? Your only going to sell so many of these Uber cars, and cannot justify the cost just for bragging rights..
        montoym
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Michael Sexton
        I'm pretty sure they'll sell all they want of both versions. Extreme cars like this are made in such small numbers that there is always more demand than supply.
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