Car and Driver reports the 2013 Ford Fusion Energi will carry an entry price tag of $39,495 before a $4,000 federal tax credit. That chunk of coin will land you behind the wheel of an SE trim plug-in hybrid, though if you feel like spending a few more pennies, the Fusion Energi Titanium can be had for $40,995. Those both offer a combined driveline output of around 188 horsepower and an all-electric range of around 20 miles depending on driving habits and ambient temperature.

Still, Ford may have a hard time convincing buyers to spend their money on the Energi when the (albeit smaller) Chevrolet Volt lands at $39,145, plus destination, and offers 40 miles of all-electric range. Throw in the fact that the Fusion Hybrid comes in a full $11,500 cheaper than its plug-in sister, and the argument for the Fusion Energi becomes even thinner.


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  • 80 Comments
      Teleny411
      • 2 Years Ago
      I still can't get over how much better looking this gen Fusion is....
      Arturo Rios Jr.
      • 2 Years Ago
      The benefits of this car will be substantial to people who do not drive many miles a day troughout the year. Myself for example, I live 1 mile away from work and less than a mile away from school. The short trips are probably once a week to visit parents, 50 miles away, and it varies on long trips. Either way 80% of the time in a year I drive less than 20 miles a day. So in theory I will only be putting gas in my car for 2000 miles a year, instead of the usual 10 000. I think the extra money is worth it if you can afford it to begin with, otherwise the regular hybrid makes perfect sense.
        Rotation
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Arturo Rios Jr.
        You'll save 8,000 divided by 47 mpg or 170 gallons of gas a year. At $3 a gallon that's $500 a year, we'll presume the electricity you replace it with is free. You'll never ever make back the extra $11,500, it'd take 23 years at this rate, say 15 with the price of gas going up over time. So you really require a non-monetary justification to buy this car.
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          $3/gallon? Not in most of the country . . . and not anywhere a couple years from now. But I agree that in his case it doesn't make much sense . . . if you are only driving a couple miles a day it doesn't much matter what you drive.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          [blocked]
          sirvixisvexed
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          Wrong, Rotation. I've been repeating the same thing over and over to deaf ears: A different machine with different parts will be worth a different amount of money in the future. Hybrid an EVs with price premiums over their comparable gas equivalents is ALWAYS (unless a certain model is a notorious lemon) worth more than that gas car. I'll go slower: In, 5, 8, 10, or however many years, a 2013 Fusion Energi will be WORTH MORE than a 2013 regular Fusion. Often times, and history has shown this since hybrids began being sold, the hybrid will hold the entire price premium in value throughout ownership. People complained that priuses from the mid 2000's were something like $4000 more than a comparatively equipped gasser that got much lower mpg. Journalists and regular people did their dumb math about making up the difference in costs, only to look like fools when low and behold, 5 years after new, the hybrid was STILL worth than same gap in purchase price.....making all of those ridiculous equations wrong.
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          No, srivixisvexed. I'm talking about a time period after which the car is essentially valueless. Anyway, you'll never make up the difference between the two on resale either. The Energi is priced to take into account the $3750 rebate you get when buying it. As used cars have no rebate on them, used cars end up comparing to the rebated price of the new car, which depresses the value of the used vehicle. Furthermore, I just compared a 2003 Prius in clean condition with 80,000 miles to a 2003 Honda Accord 4-cyl LX in clean condition with 80,000 miles. The Prius is worth $5,645. The Accord is worth $5,807. I don't see your idea that you're going to get your extra money back later. You'll get a portion back, but you won't get it all back. So unless you keep the car 15 years you're going to come out behind. Anyway, you're comparing an Energi to a regular Fusion, I was comparing an Energi to a regular Hybrid Fusion. Even if you think a hybrid will be worth notably more, it's not going to be worth $11K more. You're going to have to find a non-financial reason to buy the Energi over the hybrid.
          sirvixisvexed
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          Rotation, Not sure where you checked value. I often check autotrader and cars.com to verify the general rule of hybrids depreciating much slower, because that's the cars actually being sold, not some company's subjective 'book value'; and I always compare non hybrid equivalent to hybrid. Comparing a plug-in to a regular hybrid is a very new thing, which you are basically correct on: I'd take a 2013 fusion hybrid over an Energi as well....but if one compared the Energi to a non-hybrid vehicle with much lower MPG, say a 30k non VS the Energi at 40k....then that $10,000 gap will, as you say, slowly close and become less relevant as the cars get to 15 or 20 years old...."valueless" as you say, but even at 10 years old, an Energi will still be worth a significant chunk more than the 30k non hybrid.....enough to have it make financial sense for the people who bought the Energi, and moving the "break even" time up a good number of years sooner. Plug-ins are tough to argue with this. My argument has always been regarding non hybrid vs hybrid. If you compare some more hybrids vs. non hybrids from actual sales websites, I think you'll start to see the examples that I usually do. Try to make sure you know what both cars cost when they were new as well.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        • 2 Years Ago
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      gtv4rudy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wow! 40gs.
      Yang Xi Gua
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'd rather drive a Honda Accord plug in hybrid
      TrueDat
      • 2 Years Ago
      look... the Energi does one thing.. it raises the average fleet MPG numbers so that Ford can keep their trucks. that is its purpose. period. it's not meant to be high volume, or much of any volume at all.
        Rotation
        • 2 Years Ago
        @TrueDat
        Fleet average is average of cars sold. If the car doesn't sell, it doesn't impact the fleet average.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @TrueDat
        [blocked]
      2012JKU
      • 2 Years Ago
      This vehicle will be a much better value in a year or two when the usual Ford depreciation kicks in.
      winc06
      • 2 Years Ago
      Let me see. Chevy Volt based on the Chevy Cruze economy car which competes with Civics and Corollas with little difference except the power train for $40K or Ford Fusion Energi based a moderately luxurious mid sized car which competes with Accords and Camrys for the same price and gets 47mpg after the ev only cycle while the Volt gets 32mpg. Tough choice.
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @winc06
        Volt: 37 Combined 35 City 40 Highway http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&id=32655 And the Volt goes the first 38 miles on electric (which covers most people's daily driving) and the Fusion only gets 20. If you need the big car, get the Fusion. Otherwise, the Volt pretty much wins.
      Avinash Machado
      • 2 Years Ago
      Apples to oranges comparison. Volt is a C segment car and Fusion is from the D segment.
        Fixitfixitstop
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Avinash Machado
        Or apples to oranges for some because the Volt has a hatch and the Fusion does not.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Avinash Machado
        [blocked]
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        • 2 Years Ago
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      Cory Stansbury
      • 2 Years Ago
      Given how much larger the price delta is on this compared to the Cmax, I'm wondering if both come optioned out with almost everthing, a la Acura. If that isn't the case, they're just gouging on the Fusion. I really expected this to be my next car. If my prediction is right, it still very well might be (as a fusion hybrid optioned handsomely is in the mid 30s with no tax rebate). However, if this is the base price and you can put 5-7k of options on there...no dice. Also wondering on the trunk. A long time ago, Ford used to show 8 cubic feet on their spec sheet. They then changed it to TBD. I am hoping they found some other place to put some batteries, as 8 cubic feet is pretty small. Minus the looks, the Volt may end up being the better car. With the mileage being reported by everyone for the fusion and Cmax hybrids, it appears in the real world, the difference may be ~5 mpg between the 2. The 40 miles per charge and price advantage is pretty compelling. Too bad I don't want to be seen in a Volt...rear end is frumpy.
      postpast
      • 2 Years Ago
      This is acually a real good value, $40 995 for the Fusion Energi Titanium less $4000 tax credit equals 36 995. Thats only 4 grand more then the hybird or ecobost Titaniums ($32,995)
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