The updated, second-gen Nissan Leaf was unveiled in Japan this week, and it comes with a lot of improvements. This is still the Leaf people know and (mostly) love, but it's incrementally better all around.

For example, the new Leaf has "achieved" 228 kilometers (142 miles) of range on a charge on the JC08 test mode, up from 200 km (124 miles) in the previous version. This increase comes, in part, from better regenerative brakes and lower weight high-voltage unit. A new motor is part of a combined powertrain unit that has "integrated functions, streamlined battery module and case structure, and use of lighter parts." The dashboard now also has the remaining battery capacity displayed as a percentage. There are also three new exterior colors (bringing the total to seven): Dark Metal Gray, Brilliant White Pearl and White. For battery lovers, there is also a new "long-life mode," that will only ever charge the battery to 80 percent full no matter how the car is being charged.

Nissan also said that the new Leaf has a lower-cost "S grade" model that starts at 3,349,500 yen ($40,991 US, at today's exchange rates). Compare this to the top-of-the-line G model, which starts at 4,133,850 yen ($50,590). Subsidies are available.

More details on the Japan-only updates – and a short introductory video – are available below. We should get details on the next US model soon – and we suspect many of these updates will make the trip across the Pacific. So far, Nissan has sold 43,000 Leafs around the world.




Show full PR text
Updated Nissan LEAF Available in Japan
  • Addition of the affordable "S grade"
  • Variety of new enhancements and equipment
  • 228km of range achieved at full charge (JC08 mode)
  • 700 outlets in Japan to be equipped with quick chargers by end of fiscal year 2012
YOKOHAMA, Japan (Nov. 20, 2012) – Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. today announced the release in Japan of the updated Nissan LEAF, which has received a number of enhancements. The all-electric LEAF is in its second iteration and is now available at Nissan dealers nationwide.

The Nissan LEAF is the number one selling EV in the world. Since its debut in December 2010, more than 43,000 drivers around the world have chosen the LEAF. By purchasing one, owners are making a personal contribution to help create a sustainable zero-emission society; the LEAF emits zero CO2 or exhaust during operation.

The new LEAF continues to offer excellent performance and driving feel, with smooth, strong acceleration and quiet delivery across a speed range that's comparable to that of luxury models, as well as great handling stability realized by well-balanced weight distribution.

The affordable S grade has been added for the new model year and joins the ongoing G and X grades. There is no performance sacrifice with the new S grade.

Among several new enhancements for the new LEAF are:
  • Available genuine leather seats
  • BOSE® Energy Efficient Series sound system
  • Around View Monitor which assists parking at roadsides
  • Driving range of 228km at a full charge (JC08 mode)
  • Enhanced regenerative braking performance
  • A power-saving heating system.
At present, there are approximately 400 sales outlets in Japan that are equipped with quick chargers. In order to offer even better convenience and accessibility for LEAF owners, Nissan plans to expand the availability of quick chargers to 700 sales outlets in Japan. When the expansion is completed, one-third of dealers will be able to offer quick charging service.

The major changes in specifications and equipment of the new Nissan LEAF are:

Exterior
  • Sporty and stylish 17-inch aluminum wheels (standard on G)
  • 16-inch aluminum wheels used in the current model are available as a factory-installed option (on X)
  • 16-inch full-wheel covers (standard on S and X)
  • LED headlights with auto-leveling using blue reflection LED lights (standard on G, factory-installed option on S and X)
  • Front fog lights (standard on G, dealer-installed option on S and X)
  • Seven available body colors, including three new colors: Dark Metal Gray, Brilliant White Pearl and White.

Interior
  • Chic, elegant black interior
  • Genuine leather seats available on G and X as a factory-installed option (Airy Gray color for previous model is available on G and X)
  • Pop-up and down adjustable rear center seat headrest
  • Increased luggage space from 330L to 370L, realized by moving a downsized onboard charger from the back of the car to the front
  • Remaining battery capacity shown by percentage in the Multifunction Display
  • Foot-operated parking brake.

Basic EV structure
  • High voltage unit, including an electric motor, inverter and DC/DC converter, was integrated, resulting in a 30 percent volume reduction and a 10 percent mass reduction
  • More responsive and exhilarating acceleration feel delivered by a newly designed motor
  • Weight reduced by about 80kg compared to previous model. Achieved by combined powertrain unit, integrated functions, streamlined battery module and case structure, and use of lighter parts
  • B range that generates deceleration without feeling a change in noise and gravity even on a downward slope (standard on G and X)
  • Enhanced driving performance achieved by improved steering response in the medium-speed range and optimized suspension characteristics associated with weight reduction.

Improved power consumption
  • Reduced power consumption with a heat-pump cabin heater, heated seat for all seats, heated steering wheel and heat shield ceiling
  • Changes to the regenerative brake control system enable more efficient power generation when the brakes are operated.

Charging
  • Long-life mode (where the battery is charged to 80% to extend the battery life), now available in any charging mode
  • Improved convenience of the charging port, including a locking mechanism for the normal charging connector, LED light for charging at night and electromagnetic opener for the charging port lid.

EV IT
  • Addition of "Stop-off charging spot guidance" function, "Power-saving route guidance" function and "Battery capacity at a destination forecast" function which can allay potential range anxiety
  • New ways to search for and locate charging spots easily and quickly. Adoption of "Charging spot availability information provision" function, "Quick charger location display" function and "Unavailable charging spot display" function.

Additional enhancements
  • Lighter-weight, highly efficient BOSE® seven-speaker system: Energy Efficient System (factory-installed option on G and X)
  • Around View Monitor shows an image of the vehicle's surroundings that is not easily visible (factory-installed option on G and X)
  • Highly concentrated Plasma Cluster Ion generator which eliminates odors and kills germs (standard on G)
  • Hill Start Assist which enables a driver to start the LEAF on a slope without worrying about rolling backward
Nissan LEAF has been developed in line with Nissan's commitment to using recycled materials where possible to minimize environmental impacts. In addition, the amount of the rare earth element dysprosium used in the newly designed motor of the updated Nissan LEAF has been reduced by about 40 percent compared to the previous model-without sacrificing performance.
Pricing, Tax Incentives and Subsidies in Japan

Drive system Motor Grades Price (JPY)
2WD EM57 G 4,133,850 *Photo
X 3,757,950
S 3,349,500


All Nissan LEAF grades qualify for the Japanese government's eco-car subsidies and are exempt from the automobile weight tax and automobile acquisition tax. In addition, LEAF customers can receive up to 780,000 yen in incentive grants in accordance with the Japanese government's incentive scheme for fiscal year 2012 to promote the purchase of clean energy vehicles.

Notes:

Customers can apply for these subsidies at the Next Generation Vehicle Promotion Center. Additional subsidies may be available through local governments. To qualify for these subsidies, owners must retain the vehicle for six years.
Nissan LEAF also qualifies for preferential tax incentives available for environmentally friendly vehicles. As such, the LEAF is fully exempt from the automobile acquisition tax on vehicles registered by March 31, 2015, and the automobile weight tax on vehicles registered by April 30, 2015.
Additionally, the automobile tax on vehicles registered by March 31, 2014 is reduced by 50 percent for one year starting from the next fiscal year following the registrations.
BOSE is a registered trademark of the Bose Corporation.
Plasma Cluster is a registered trademark of the Sharp Corporation.

For information about Nissan's comprehensive approach to zero emissions, please visit: http://www.nissan-zeroemission.com/EN/

About Nissan
Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., Japan's second-largest automotive company, is headquartered in Yokohama, Japan, and is part of the Renault-Nissan Alliance. Operating with more than 248,000 employees globally, Nissan provided customers with more than 4.8 million vehicles in 2011, generating revenue of 9.4 trillion yen ($US118.95 billion). With a strong commitment to developing exciting and innovative products for all, Nissan delivers a comprehensive range of 64 models under the Nissan and Infiniti brands. A pioneer in zero-emission mobility, Nissan made history with the introduction of the Nissan LEAF, the first affordable, mass-market, pure-electric vehicle and winner of numerous international accolades, including the prestigious 2011-2012 Car of the Year Japan and 2011 World Car of the Year awards.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 40 Comments
      Rotation
      • 1 Day Ago
      Now I've had a better look, some interesting stuff. No mention of a 6.6kW charger. That's a bummer. Heat pump heater. That's great news! Heat shield roof is also a great idea, I wonder how effective it is? I wonder what they meant by "B range that generates deceleration without feeling a change in noise and gravity even on a downward slope (standard on G and X)"? I'm pretty sure the previous model LEAF didn't alter gravity noticeably regardless of the angle it was positioned at. The improvements to EV IT sound interesting.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Rotation
        Japanese homes haven't got the wiring to cope with 6.6kw, so they haven't bothered there.
      Spec
      • 1 Day Ago
      Well, this bodes well for a cheaper Leaf when the US plant opens. I'd really like to see them offer an SAE Combo plug too.
      DaveMart
      • 1 Day Ago
      Increased range per charge also mitigates a wee bit concerns about battery cycle life as you cycle less often for a given mileage. Details of the exact calculations on how much this will help for anyone interested in my comments here: http://www.greencarcongress.com/2012/11/leaf-20121120.html
        DaveMart
        • 1 Day Ago
        @DaveMart
        Perhaps it is worth mentioning here that the improvement is a lot more than the 14% nominal increase in range, as at the same rate of degradation 80% of the 114% is more than previously, so it takes a lot more miles to get to the same actual capacity. Its not big enough to solve the problem of unacceptable capacity loss even in temperate climates though.
          krona2k
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          DaveMart believes that if you *buy* a LEAF you will bankrupt yourself, regardless of how you use the car or how long you keep it. Strange.
          krona2k
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          This is going to be by final post on this, since you're obviously not capable of understanding depreciation in terms of Total Cost of Ownership. If I buy a car with the intention of keeping it for a long time depreciation is just a potential paper loss at some intermediate time. This may be of concern to you, perhaps you lose sleep over negative equity or other negatives on your spreadsheet, I don't. I'll explain, yet again, for the final time: I bought my last car, a 1999 Hyundai Coupe in 2001 for about £15000 and I sold it just a few weeks ago with ~87000 miles for £400 and I consider myself very lucky to get that much. www.webuyanycar.com and the like would have given me much much less, I know I did get quotes from them. So my total cost of ownership was for my Hyundai, well I haven't calculated it, you're the accountant why don't you do it for me? I think we both know it was pretty huge when factoring in fuel, maintenance and other ICE related costs. So, in simple words (I hope this works!), when you buy a car, even one with as much utility, range and longevity as an ICE car it becomes basically worthless after 10 years. Now, I know more modern cars may not have such a depreciation as my Hyundai but I'm only thinking about what I want, what I need and what makes sense for me now. Here are some facts which obviously will have no impact whatsoever on your spreadsheet based thinking: 1) I want an electric car, I want the plus points and am willing to live with the minus points. We have a Prius already for longer journeys. 2) I can afford a LEAF, particularly second hand thanks to your beloved depreciation. 3) The total cost of ownership will be no worse than what I experience with my Hyundai and probably much much better. 4) It's not even possible to lease a LEAF cheaply in the UK even if I took your word as gospel (which I don't). 5) 40 miles range is sufficient for me, this will still be available on the LEAF after 10 years using Nissan's own numbers (surely this will please you?)
          DaveMart
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          krona: You obviously don't know what depreciation means. If you want to buy your hobby car, go ahead. Back in the real world, people have to worry about cost per mile travelled. Let me know how you get on when you come to try to sell your hobby car. I emphasise that I am NOT knocking electric cars, but the battery choice in the Leaf.
          krona2k
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          No, you face reality. You've done it again by stating the LEAF would be ok to buy if you only needed 10 miles a day and under NO other circumstances should ANYONE buy a LEAF ever, end of story, no argument. State it one more time, it makes no sense to buy a LEAF even if 40 miles a day is acceptable in 10 years. That is *my* requirement, so tell me one more time that I should not buy a LEAF under any circumstances because its financial suicide. I mean, we haven't even got into the non financial reasons... Really DaveMart give it a rest.
          noevfud
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          The car does not need to be charged to 80% to save that battery, this is a misconception based on half-facts and lack of understanding of that feature and the LEAF charge system. 100% is not 100% in a LEAF and it does not harm the pack, sitting at 100% for extended times does.
          krona2k
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          More financial advice coming up, if you are in negative equity (underwater) on your mortgage you must immediately liquidize whatever assets you have to attempt to rectify the situation. If you do not you will have negative numbers on your spreadsheet and that is unacceptable. /sarcasm
          DaveMart
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          krona: I have no idea how you manage to flatly ignore reality. It is not my figures, it is Nissan's, as given in this interview with Andy Palmer: http://green.autoblog.com/2012/10/10/nissan-andy-palmer-leaf-battery-degradation-crisis-video/ Right at the start of the video, the average life, not specific to hot climates, is given at 60,000 miles on the lenient LA4 cycle down to 80%. Adjusted to the more realistic for most EPA cycle, that is around 45,000 miles. In the same video Palmer says that they have no plans or costs for a replacement battery. Now maybe all that is fine if you drive 10 miles a day or something, but then again so would a bicycle be fine under that use. As a realistic car with reasonable costs it is not fine though. Do face reality. It is more challenging, but kind of what grown ups do.
      Ryan
      • 1 Day Ago
      Do they have a 12V Lead acid battery still in there or was that just for the auto show? They could lose 50 lbs right there by going to a DC-DC converter.
        Chris M
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Ryan
        A123 was planning to produce a LiIon replacement for the standard 12 volt battery lead acid car battery, with built-in regulation, using their heat resistant iron phosphate cells. That would make a simple drop-in replacement and shave a couple of pounds off of the weight. Not sure of the cost, or even if it is available now. Porsche was also selling a LiIon 12 volt starter battery, for those wanting to shave off every possible ounce on their sports car. Very expensive!
        AndrewH
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Ryan
        No, they can't do that. What are you supposed to do when your main batteries die and you have to route life support to your weapons to defeat the Kodan command ship? Think, man! (Ahem... sorry... Just watched "The Last Starfighter" again...)
        SVX pearlie
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Ryan
        They probably keep it, to keep things simple, but should pull it for the next-gen vehicle.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Ryan
        Nope, even the Tesla S uses a sealed 12 volt battery. That way if your main pack is not working you can still open and shut doors etc and you avoid uneven drainage of your battery cells. They could go to a lithium battery from lead for the 12 volt but that is more expensive at the moment.
        Spec
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Ryan
        50 pounds? You must have a Uranium-Acid battery.
        noevfud
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Ryan
        You must have a 12V battery in a LEAF, a DC/DC will not solve the problem in this application.
      AndrewH
      • 1 Day Ago
      "So far, Nissan has sold 43,000 Leafs around the world." Shouldn't that be "Leaves"? And while we're at it, they're Tauri, Foci and Lexi. And Infiniti, Altima and Maxima are plural forms. You own an Infinitus, Altimum or Maximum. j/k Mostly...
      Sasparilla Fizz
      • 1 Day Ago
      Nice updates, but lease only baby....
      Rotation
      • 1 Day Ago
      Hmm. Longer range on paper, but now they are going to more strongly recommend people stick to the 80% charge regimen, so people's actual experienced range may be shorter. Hopefully will help with the premature aging though.
        JakeY
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Rotation
        "recommend people stick to the 80% charge regimen, so people's actual experienced range may be shorter" As long as it's not their daily range, it doesn't really matter. If they need to charge to 100%, it's always available, so it's not just on paper. Plus the variable that matters in battery degradation is the amount of time that the battery is at 100% SOC. If you charge the car daily to 100% SOC, but use it up almost immediately (within hours), there's going to be only a negligible difference between charging to 80% SOC. The worse case is if you don't actually need that much range and you charge it to 100% SOC anyways and keep it there for a long time (days).
          JakeY
          • 1 Day Ago
          @JakeY
          @Rotation "Nissan didn't lower the top charge level because the old one wasn't damaging" It seems like you are talking about something different than what I'm talking about. First of all, no where does the article say they have lowered the top charge level (max charge voltage). They only added a new "long life mode" that sets a hard limit of 80% when active (you can charge to 100% with it disabled). What I'm talking about (and noevfud also) is there's two 100% SOCs. One is what the consumer sees when the car says its fully charged "100%". The other is the actual 100% SOC the battery cell is rated for (AKA 4.2V/cell). What the consumer sees is always lower. I haven't looked at the voltage for the Leaf's cells, but I guess I have to for clarification. The max cell voltage for the Leaf is 4.2V/cell (according to the first responder manual, max pack voltage is 403.2V for 96 cells). This is the battery cell's "true" 100% SOC. Users who have charged their car to an indicated "100%" report 394.5V pack voltage; this corresponds to 4.11V/cell. An "80%" charge is 4.05V/cell. http://priuschat.com/threads/nissan-specialist-told-me-leaf-has-replacable-battery-modules.101432/ http://www.mynissanleaf.com/viewtopic.php?p=117148 It's similar for the Tesla Roadster. Battery manufacturers have set a limit of 4.2V/cell as 100% SOC. Tesla sets a hard limit of 4.15V/cell as "100%" charged for the car (available only in "Range" charging mode). The "Standard" charging mode has 4.10V/cell as the limit. http://www.teslamotors.com/blog/bit-about-batteries So at no point is anyone charging their batteries at or over 4.2V/cell as you seem to be implying. That would be overcharging and is obviously bad. I'm only talking about cycling to 100% SOC as indicated to the consumer (which is 4.11V/cell for the Leaf, 4.15V/cell for the Tesla Roadster). That has negligible battery impact compared to "80%" charge (4.05V for Leaf) or "Standard" charge (4.10V for Roadster). Plus standard battery tests DO cycle to 4.2V/cell ("true" 100% SOC). It's readily apparent if you look at any standard battery datasheet (here's one for the cells in the Model S): http://industrial.panasonic.com/www-data/pdf2/ACA4000/ACA4000CE254.pdf
          JakeY
          • 1 Day Ago
          @JakeY
          @Rotation That cycling loss is negligible compared with the loss from storage at 100% SOC. Plus like noevfud says, it's not true 100% SOC in the first place for pretty much all EVs. Since battery cycle life is rated from a true 0-100% SOC cycling in the first place, you will still get your rated battery life if you cycle your battery that way (a battery like the Leaf will get about a 1000-1500 cycles to 70%, or good for about 73k to 110k EPA miles in the Leaf, corresponding well to the warranty terms). Stored at 100% SOC at 25C a lithium cobalt battery (the kind Tesla uses) loses 20% of its capacity in a year (irrecoverable), stored at 40% SOC it loses only 4%/year. It's pretty obvious that's the major battery killer (which is why Tesla's BMS will purposefully discharge the battery using the cooling system if it's at or near 100% SOC for a long time). The other killer is battery temperature. At 40% SOC and 40C the loss is 15%/year. At 100% SOC and 40C loss is 35%/year. The lithium manganese chemistry of the Leaf was supposed to be less affected by this (from Nissan's early PR talking about not needing active cooling), but apparently it's still affected judging by the degradation issues in high temperature areas. http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_store_batteries
          G
          • 1 Day Ago
          @JakeY
          Guys, take it easy. There is a technical shop manual, which clear a lot of these questions. Owners have collected a lot of data from the CAN bus as well. One thing is certain, these cells never see more then 4.1 V terminal voltage. We would expect maximum energy to be reached at 4.17V for this chemistry, and the long-life mode corresponds to 4.05V. This has been confirmed to be 80% true SOC and the full charge you were discussing above is about 94-95% true SOC. Many affected owners in Phoenix were experienced EV drivers and charged to 80% only. They still lost battery capacity bars. We did not see much difference in the rate of capacity bar loss between 80 and 100% chargers. There was some difference, but it was not very pronounced. The first person who reported the issue left their Leaf fully charged when they went on vacation. We blamed her when she reported the first know capacity bar loss. Unfortunately, others followed fast and furious, and it did not seem to matter much, which charging protocol they followed. Oddly enough, people that charged on level 1 (120V outlet) and parked their car outside in a carport instead of a garage seemed to be the last ones to report problems. From what we know, the LMO chemistry many OEMs, including Nissan, have picked for its exceptional safety profile and low cost, are also most affected by ambient heat. Nobody expected to lose 10, 12, 15 or 20% of range after a little more than 1 year of ownership. There was a pronounced difference among owners, and those that leased were much more willing to accept this as fact of life. Others were not so easily satisfied. For what it's worth, Nissan has to this day not announced the replacement cost of the battery, even though many owners have asked, and insisted that this information be disclosed.
          Rotation
          • 1 Day Ago
          @JakeY
          You're both funny. Nissan didn't lower the top charge level because the old one wasn't damaging. It doesn't matter whether it's truly 100% or not, Nissan has made clear that charging to the top produces disproportionate wear on the pack. I dunno about battery university, but I can tell you with my experience with batteries and what the vendors told me about charging their cells. The key is never to present a voltage higher than 4.2V (in the case of LI-Ion) over the terminals. Not just to not charge the pack past 4.1V, but not to place 4.2V across the pack, even if the end of charge level is set to 4.1V. Tesla and Nissan say the same thing. Charging to 100% wears the pack prematurely. Vendors said the same thing to me (about cells, not packs, I never dealt with multicell packs). Now you want to say it doesn't matter. Funny thing, but I'll take the word of Tesla, Nissan and cell vendors over yours.
          Rotation
          • 1 Day Ago
          @JakeY
          No, the variable is charging the battery to 100% SOC. Lions swell more and produce more heat when charged that high. Just putting a 4.2V potential across a Li-Ion battery wears it further than only charging to 4.1V. And while I didn't say the range was only on paper, it's also not there at the drop of a hat either. You must decide each night (or early morning) whether to go to 100% for the day and suffer higher battery aging or whether to suffer reduced range the next day. If you charge the battery to 100% "and don't actually need that much range"? That doesn't make sense. The real issue under your situation would be if you don't drive it at all. Because if you drive it even 20% of range, you'll get it down to 80%. It's not the last 20% of range used that gets it down below 80%, but the first 20%.
          noevfud
          • 1 Day Ago
          @JakeY
          Charging a LEAF to 100% does not impact the lease or the life of the pack in any way worth caring about, leaving it at 100% for long periods of time will shorten the life of the pack however. When one charges a LEAF to100% it is NOT 100%, it is in the low 90s as the car stops charge there. Same for 0, it is not 0. 80% charging is designed for that do not know better than to leave the car fully charged for days. Setting no start timer and only an end timer is also a good technique for charging a LEAF.
          noevfud
          • 1 Day Ago
          @JakeY
          The fact is 80% charging is there as a dummy mode. Charging to 100% does not shorten life unless there are extreme heat issues. I have detailed information on this and work with the LEAF pack and the LEAF systems for a living. This applies to QC as well with the issue again being heat, the heat knee starts at about 80% can jumps on QC because of the output, this does not happen on L2. I watch these numbers on a daily basis. There is considerable ignorance and miss information about the LEAF pack and charging and most of it comes from dealers and blogs like this. Nissan did a poor job explaining the "whys" of charging and lead everyone to assumption.
          Rotation
          • 1 Day Ago
          @JakeY
          JakeY: I think you need to look at what Nissan said about the LEAF after the Arizona problems. They always had the ability to stop charging at 80%, but it wasn't activated unless you used the charge timer. Because of this, people were frequently charging to 100%. Nissan then came out and said this was the reason people were experiencing premature pack wear and they can expect premature pack wear unless they stop doing it. So I'll say it again, Nissan has changed the default full charge to 80% now, when it was 100% before. This is pretty clearly because of the problems of pack wear. This isn't to say 100% won't still be available, but like with Tesla, it will be discouraged and you will be warned about potential pack life problems. So you can bounce around voltages all you want and claim you think it's only a problem if you leave the pack at high charge (which actually means continual charging, since the pack will naturally discharge anyway), but Tesla and Nissan seem to discourage to what they call 100% (no matter what level it truly represents) because of issues of pack wear and now Nissan is doing so more forcefully than before. Hence my comment that despite the higher capacity pack in 2013s, customers may experience shorter battery life in normal use than with a 2012 and what people were normally using them as. Still, as mentioned by others, you're going to see longer pack life in general because any given trip will use less pack capacity and that means you may not even need range mode now.
        MTN RANGER
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Rotation
        If I had a Leaf on lease, I'd charge that baby up to 100% :-)
          SVX pearlie
          • 1 Day Ago
          @MTN RANGER
          As long as you can get to work and back, why not use your leased Leaf as a time shift for your power consumption? Charge it 100% at night, then discharge back down during the day down to 0% at the start of night rates? Serving as a buffer for the power company could go a long way toward helping mitigate overall electrical charges.
          Rotation
          • 1 Day Ago
          @MTN RANGER
          Good point! I wonder if there's some kind of limit on how often you can use full charge in the less agreement?
      MTN RANGER
      • 1 Day Ago
      Not bad for a mid-cycle update. I would still like to see active battery management like the Volt and Tesla; that will probably be in V2.0.
        fefifofum
        • 1 Day Ago
        @MTN RANGER
        And the Ford Focus EV
        AndrewH
        • 1 Day Ago
        @MTN RANGER
        How is that done? Is it a software update that can be applied to previous models?
          GoodCheer
          • 1 Day Ago
          @AndrewH
          Depending on how much space there is around the pack, it should be possible to blow air-conditioned air through the pack rather than ambient air. That would certainly help, but the systems complexity needed, and the decisions about whether to drain energy while the car is parked to keep the pack cool would not be easy to answer.
          Rotation
          • 1 Day Ago
          @AndrewH
          Nissan doesn't blow ambient air through the pack. The pack is sealed. To circulate any kind of air (air-conditioned or not) through the pack would require redesigning the pack. And likely the car.
          Rotation
          • 1 Day Ago
          @AndrewH
          No. They'll have to redesign the pack.
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