Perhaps the clash between CHAdeMO and SAE Combo fast charger standards can be resolved by free market enterprise. For example: The Equinox 50kW fast DC charger, which "will be the first unit on the market to combine both CHAdeMO and Combo protocols," according the GRIDbot website.
Equinox is being developed by GRIDbot and IES-Synergy through a strategic partnership to help deployment of electro-mobility in North America. GRIDbot is distributing and servicing IES' fast chargers. The Equinox will likely be the first to combine the two connector standards into a single wired connection and a single station, enabling power flow and communications for any modern plug-in vehicle (adapter required for Tesla models). It should be available on the North American market during the first quarter of 2013.

GRIDbot and IES say the new chargers will be delivered through the Plug-n-Ride Network that will process nationwide financial transactions, data management and reporting and record carbon reductions for carbon credit data collection. Users of the system will be able to upgrade at a later date to access vehicle-to-grid capabilities.

Japanese automakers, particularly Nissan, Toyota and Mitsubishi, are supporting the CHAdeMO standard, which has been in use primarily in Japan since 2010. SAE Combo supporters such as BMW, Volkswagen, Ford and General Motors, prefer having one port to charge at both Level 2 and DC fast charge. CHAdeMO requires an extra port to accommodate fast charging.

The battle is on for which protocol will dominate EV fast charging networks. Perhaps Equinox could support a peace treaty?


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      bluepongo1
      • 2 Years Ago
      May the highest quality win, to minimize risk.
      samcrut
      • 7 Months Ago
      I say go with the Tesla plug. It's the smallest and has the quickest charge capacity.
      MTN RANGER
      • 2 Years Ago
      As I said previously, the standards will work themselves out over time. EVSE makers will do what needs to be done; especially since these cost $10k or more. Just get the EVSEs and new models of PEVs rolled out!
      2 wheeled menace
      • 2 Years Ago
      Good! we need standards. Closed standards only hurts an emerging industry. There is no reason to have multiple charger standards!
      Giza Plateau
      • 2 Years Ago
      Sure, if they are somewhat electrically compatible it should be easy to support both.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        I believe that both of these chargers push DC current. So compatibility comes down only to the connector and the computer that tells the charger 'hey, give me X volts at X amps'.
          mustang_sallad
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 wheeled menace
          That's basically it - the high power stuff stays the same, but the communications between the vehicle and the charger are totally different (CAN for Chademo vs PLC over the pilot signal for J1772).
          JakeY
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 wheeled menace
          Yep. That's why I suspect most chargers going forward will support both protocols since it doesn't add to the cost of the charger significantly.
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 wheeled menace
          "... support both protocols since it doesn't add to the cost..." Do we know anything about licensing costs?
      DaveMart
      • 2 Years Ago
      Renault have by far the best system: http://www.fororenaultzoe.com/index.php?topic=255.0 This looks like catching on in Europe. Italy is adopting it for a start, and its darn sure France will.
        skierpage
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DaveMart
        It's "by far the best" for Europe where three-phase 400V power is standard. It's a non-starter in Japan and the USA. Also it's interesting that the German automakers support the SAE frankenplug despite the European version using the Mennekes AC socket with the two DC pins underneath. If high-power AC up to 43 kW from the same Mennekes socke is so good then why complicate it with the extra pins for just 7 kW more? 6 months ago I would have assumed that an on-board AC charger that can handle 43 kW would be very expensive, but the Zoe doesn't seem like it's going to be expensive.