• 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

  • 2013 Moto Guzzi California 1400

From the adorable Vespa 946 to the brawny Moto Guzzi California 1400 and the go-anywhere Aprilia Caponord 1200, the Piaggio Group came to the 2012 EICMA International Motorcycle Show armed with an array of hardware. When it comes to that plucky Vespa 946, engineers approached the bike with an eye toward incorporating modern technology and efficiencies to a classic design. The result is a scooter with all LED lighting and an engine capable of yielding 129 miles per gallon. That figure is thanks in part to a new focus on weight savings. The 946 ditches steel for aluminum in its side plates, fenders and seat for the first time.

Too demure for your tastes? The Moto Guzzi California 1400 Touring and Custom models boast the largest production twin-cylinder engine ever built in Europe, according to the company. At 1380 cc, the big twin cranks out 96 horsepower and 88 pound-feet of torque, but it's the impressive amount of detail lavished on the bikes that make them special. Moto Guzzi went so far as to screen print lettering on the machine's valve covers for a little extra flair. Take some time to chew on the gallery above. You'll be glad you did.

Finally, the 2013 Aprilia Caponord 1200 offers adventure riders an alternative to all those BMW GS, KTM Adventure and Triumph Tiger models rolling around. The Caponord 1200 uses the frame from the company's Dorsoduro 1200 paired with a 1197 cc V-twin engine. There's 128 horsepower and 85 lb-ft of torque to be had from the configuration, and engineers lavished the bike with a raft of rider aids. Those include traction control, ride-by-wire, separate engine maps and dual-channel ABS, to name a few. Shovel out a few extra dollars, and Aprilia will serve up the company's semi-adaptive suspension as well. Riders facing down cooler weather will also appreciate the adjustable windshield and heated grips.

Again, be sure to scroll through the high-res galleries above and below to take in all the incessantly Italian detailing.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 8 Comments
      Doug Danzeisen Sr
      • 2 Years Ago
      Love that Guzzi, has a lot of presence. would be a great alternative to an HD. Any word yet on pricing>?
      Vergenbuurg
      • 2 Years Ago
      As a long time fan of Moto Guzzi, I must say that that 1400 is stunningly gorgeous.
      Ben Dover
      • 2 Years Ago
      I don't know why more bikes aren't designed with TOP cases rather than side luggage. Who wants to walk around all day with their helmet and jacket? A top case can fit those, side cases unless they are ridiculously wide cannot. Top cases are higher and easier to load and unload than side-cases as well, especially when on the sidestand. Top cases keep the bike narrow for lane splitting/parking, and are more aerodynamic since they are already in turbulent air behind the rider. Top cases are also easier to wire as a large third brakelight (many with integrated turn signals), and its easier to lock/unlock just one case than two smaller ones. And lastly passengers LOVE top cases, as they serve as a nice secure and comforting backrest for them, which is less scary when you punch the gas so they don't have to have a death grip on your waist, or hug so close that their helmet hits yours on hard braking.
        Jim Lowe
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ben Dover
        I have no problem fitting my jacket and helmet in my side cases and they aren't exceptionally wide at all. In fact, they are still narrower than the widest point on the bike. Granted, my saddle bags are leather so I can actually stuff them if needed.
          Ducman69
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jim Lowe
          Full face helmet + narrow side cases = bullshit by definition. If its not a full face helmet, I hope you don't mind grinding your jaw off in a crash.
      Brex
      • 2 Years Ago
      I was searching the other day for new information on the Ducati Hypermotard with the new 820 engine and stumbled upon an Italian site showing photos of the new Vespa 946 which really caught my eye. I'm not a Vespa follower but the design is classic yet modern and the style is fantastic. Looks like a gallery piece. Vespa... Ducati... Vespa... Ducati.
      Rob
      • 2 Years Ago
      This makes me want a Griso 8V again
      David
      • 2 Years Ago
      No under seat storage Vespa-Piaggio?!