A Fisker for the rest of us?

That's what Plug In Cars is reporting, saying that the California-based maker of the really expensive Karma extended-range plug-in may start developing a lower-end model that would compete with the Chevrolet Volt.

The car would not only sell in the range of the Volt – $40,000-ish – but may be developed with a yet-to-be-named automaker partner that has a little more experience in mass-production.

The new model will be different from the Project Nina-cum-Fisker Atlantic that was originally thought to sell in the $40,000 price range and was to be built at a Delaware factory formerly occupied by General Motors. That model, which at one time was thought to start production this year, won't likely see the light of day until 2014 or 2015.

Whatever happens – and, again, these are just rumors of hints at this point – the Volt comparison is appropriate, given that Tony Posawatz, the former vehicle-line director for the Volt, replaced Tom LaSorda as Fisker's CEO in August.


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  • 20 Comments
      Marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      This is a typical ABG beat up. The source of this story is an article written by Jay Cole for ' Inside EV's', a fairly obscure blog which admitted that the story had no factual basis, but was just interesting speculation. ABG, republished this article from an Eric Loveday article, which is in turn a copy of the Jay Cole story ! I may be wrong, but I think most ABG readers would find it more interesting if Danny King wrote his own critiques, rather than simply repeating the content of other articles. Sitting that issue aside, IMHO, Fisker Motors should concentrate on perfecting the Karma, ( building RHD, and convertible versions) , before embarking on any new adventures. As Peter, Spec and SVX pearlie , all point out, auto-manufacture is a very capital intensive, low profit, high risk business. Fisker Motors lack the financial or infrastructure resources to successfully compete against volume products like GM's Volt. As a specialist luxury marque, Fisker can probably survive and prosper selling vehicles to a clientele seeking something unusual and exclusive. Fisker buyers are motivated by a different ethos than purchasers of a GM's Volt or Toyota's hybrids. Fisker Motors would be better rewarded selling 4000 Sunset convertibles a year, with $40,000 profit in each, than try to compete with GM, Toyota, Ford BMW, Tesla, Nissan etc in a very competitive market sector with low margins. The Fisker Karma is potentially a great car for those buyers who appreciate it's qualities. Fisker should concentrate on improving better the Karma's reputation, in a market segment where the Karma is competitive, than diverting it's limited resources to projects which Fisker Motors has neither the capital, expertise or infrastructure to successfully complete. But, that's just my opinion.
      raktmn
      • 2 Years Ago
      I don't understand why they are pushing another new platform when they are so far from delivering the Atlantic. All it does is remind everyone how far they are behind on putting out the Atlantic.
        Giza Plateau
        • 2 Years Ago
        @raktmn
        I'm not sure that's the problem. Plans can change. I think the business viability of Fisker is far more significant and might preempt launch of any new car. Fisker seems to burn through cash at the same rate as Tesla, and that is unsustainable.
      Grendal
      • 2 Years Ago
      This article says they aren't working on anything else besides the Atlantic: http://www.topspeed.com/cars/car-news/topspeed-exclusive-fisker-clears-the-air-about-the-karma-issues-atlantic-delay-combusting-fan-future-plans-and-financial-status-ar136961.html
        Grendal
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Grendal
        The important quote: "We are looking about two to three years ahead” in terms of development, growth, and lineup expansion. Inside of these three years, the only lineup expansion that Fisker sees is the addition of the Atlantic. We grilled Mr. Ormisher on potential other models and possibly more performance-oriented variants of the Karma and he made it very clear that the Atlantic is the only future model in the works and that the Atlantic is the bread-and-butter car in Fisker’s success, but Ormisher noted that the Karma will “…remain as our halo car.”
      EZEE
      • 2 Years Ago
      Something like this would be explosive! Buahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha..... Buahahahahahhahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha.....! (wipes eyes....holds side).... Buahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaahahahhaha! In all serious (no, really), I wish them all the success in the world. The more, the better. Maybe they didn't start well, but then if the Atlantic makes it, then this? Good luck Fisker! :)
        EZEE
        • 2 Years Ago
        @EZEE
        Hahahahahahahahahhaahahahahahahahahahahaha! :D
          bluepongo1
          • 2 Years Ago
          @EZEE
          AAAUUGGGHH!!!!...they scratched me with their girly downvotes but not their scathing snobbery;-( there's still time... don't let me turn into one of them. Save yourself!! *BANG*
          bluepongo1
          • 2 Years Ago
          @EZEE
          We must run you fool!!....Before the firey Fisker fanboy zombies get here!!.... damn you, you funny bastard!!
      throwback
      • 2 Years Ago
      Sounds like Fisker is desperately searching for a sugar daddy. Small independent car companies can't survive in this industry any more. Porsche was the most sucessful, but even they realized eventually they needed the scale of a larger company.
        SVX pearlie
        • 2 Years Ago
        @throwback
        Porsche has the problem of not being focused. They were a German company (too small), then an American company (vulnerable to currency exchange), then a hedge fund (oops!), now a VAG subsidiary. Fisker will eventually get bought up, I think that's what the other OEMs are waiting for.
        pmpjunkie01
        • 2 Years Ago
        @throwback
        Porsche's attempted to take over VAG. But the deal got held up long enough by the government of Lower Saxony, which holds a minority stake with blocking ability, for Porsche to run out of cash. They were finally forced to sell to VAG. Lots of family drama behind that one too. They were only able to get into that position because they were the most profitable car maker on the planet.
      Vlad
      • 2 Years Ago
      i doubt they can compete outside the exotic car segment.
      Peter
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Volt is a highly complex car built not at a loss, but at a very sharp margin despite a high volume, after a billion dollar development effort that will take a decade of amortization. The Volt is a moving target, as it gets software upgrades, and hardware tweaks on an ongoing basis. The Volt 2, when it comes, will have further significant optimizations (cost savings) applied now that they have real world data as to where corners need reinforcing, and where they can be cut. So you want to compete head to head? Good luck with that Fisker.
        SVX pearlie
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Peter
        GM gambled pretty big on the Volt, against a background of BEVs being the hot item back then. I remember the EV purists giving GM a lot of flak for including the gas engine, despite the advantages. I'm glad the Volt is succeeding and likely to advance and broaden the technology going forward. It's kinda funny how everybody is coming out with a Volt-like system now. Even Mitsu is backtracking from the BEV MIEV to some sort of PHEV / EREV. Baby steps, people. The car industry is a conservative one.
      goodoldgorr
      • 2 Years Ago
      They should construct a plug-in hybrid fire truck instead.
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        For the firemen in Fahrenheit 451?
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      I just don't see how Fisker is every going to be able to compete on price. They lack the supply chain, mass purchasing scale, etc.
        SVX pearlie
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spec
        Hence, Fisker looking for a partner who can build on a larger scale. Fisker is seeing how big the Volt market has gotten, and how Ford is now jumping in the ring this year. When the Fusion Energi hits the market, along with the Volt 2.0 and ELR, plus whatever else is under wraps today, they rightly see that they're going to be heavily challenged to survive as a boutique manufacturer. Like most EV makers, Fisker was hoping to grab a big slice before the big guys got serious and ramped up. Playing higher in the market with a more-versatile PHEV technology bought Fisker a bit of breathing room compared to Aptera, etc. But they're seeing where they have to choose between going big and competing with the Volt / ELR, or else going way up like Gumpert and Pagani. The problem is that they're not making jewel-like things a la Pagani and McLaren. So they need volume. Anyone who they'd want to partner with (GM, Ford, BMW, Benz, Nissan, Mitsu, Toyota) already has a plan. That leaves Chrysler/Fiat (nothing) and Volkswagen (dead Etron), both of which are large enough to think they can probably go it alone (esp. VAG). It's a very tough spot to be in.
      JEO
      • 2 Years Ago
      Let me guess ... the Fiskar Bolt
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