It looks like one Washington, DC-area cab operator looking to have an all-electric fleet of cabs isn't quite ready for takeoff.

Officials in Arlington, VA, unanimously voted against green-lighting Electric Vehicle Taxicab founder Malik Khattak's efforts to go all-Nissan Leaf with his fleet because the officials are concerned over the EVs making the trip to Dulles Airport, Plug In Cars reports.

With Dulles located 26 miles from central DC, officials worried about the prospect of Leafs not being able to make the trip without a recharge. Khattak, who'd planned for 50 Leafs and 56 charging stations in the area, said that the installation of a charging station at Dulles would solve that issue.

EV advocates have pointed to taxi fleets as a great way to cut emissions because of their high mileage and fuel efficiency, though some have said that rapid recharges may decrease the life of a typical electric-vehicle battery. Leafs have been tested for taxi use in New York (pictured) and Mexico City.


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  • 44 Comments
      Ford Future
      • 2 Years Ago
      Most cabs take ONE Person to a destination, 99% of the time.
      EZEE
      • 2 Years Ago
      Not blaming the president....the 'Obama phone' comment was directed at that famous Internet clip, not the man himself. My rant was somewhat unrelated. I am not a no regulations guy. Lets not, for example, strip mine yellow stone. But in this case, he will sink or swim on his efforts. If I had to take a taxi 95 miles, I would opt for the crown Vic. My choice. What business does the government have in taxi's, however. Let him (even saying, 'let him' frosts me, as we shouldn't have to say that in a free country) have his company. If it fails, it fails. Feel free to downvote on my rant being unrelated. I got rolling and didn't stop....
      Turbo Froggy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Malik Khattak is a savvy businessman who has done the math here and knows the limitations of the Leaf. If he were to refuse fares or get stranded with fares onboard he would go out of business fast. Why should the "Officials" care? If he shoots himself in the foot by not planning correctly and handling the airport runs properly then that is his own business. If this happens, then get involved. What they will more than likely do is incorporate SOC tracking in their Leafs and if someone calls for a ride to the airport, the automated dispatch will send a Leaf that has enough range. And as for battery concerns, what if they lease them all? Then it doesn't matter. I can tell you one thing, I bet you $1 that behind these "Officials" are other taxi companies in town that are freaking out over the prospect of a taxi company coming into town with 1/10th the operating cost per mile. That is a HUGE advantage. He should fight these officials with his business plan and line-by-line attack their argument with data and facts. He will prevail he just needs to keep up the fight. He will have a lot of people against him, outside oil company money, rival taxi company money and "experts" coming out of the woodwork.
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 2 Days Ago
        @Turbo Froggy
        Very interesting, I concur. So nice of the city to determine what the best way to run a business is. In this Malik Khattak is helping to clean up the city and wants to invest to do so. There is about as much safety here as a pedestrian warning sound. Another solution to a problem that never existed. What do these officials do to the 10,000 people that run out of gas every day in America.
        SVX pearlie
        • 2 Days Ago
        @Turbo Froggy
        "Why should the "Officials" care?" Because they're the ones who determine who operates under their license, and allowing taxis to pick-and-choose their fares sets a very poor precedent. The other taxi companies want a level playing field, and they deserve one. They should not be competing with taxis that get to select more profitable fares, while dumping less profitable fares behind. Perhaps the taxi commission should simply require all taxis to have a minimum EPA-rated range of 300 or 400 miles, and let the market sort things out from there? Like mandating a minimum number of seats, setting minimum range is a technology-neutral requirement. If a taxi company wants to use 300-mile Tesla Model S BEVs, I'm sure that would be OK. While he can fight the commission, that ties up management time and energy, along with potential legal fees. That's not how one wants to run a business (unless you're the RIAA / MPAA and the courts *are* your business).
      Turbo Froggy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Prius has been used as a Taxi a novelty? Really? I guess you have not been to SeaTac airport in Seattle in a while. 95% of all taxi's picking up people are Prius. Also there are already several all Leaf taxi fleets already in operation: London: http://cars.uk.msn.com/news/free-nissan-leaf-taxis-this-weekend Sao Paulo: http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1076788_2012-nissan-leaf-becomes-a-taxi-in-sao-paulo-city New York: http://www.americanriderztaxi.com/taxi-fleet-of-nissan-leaf.html Amsterdam: http://blog.nissan-global.com/EN/?p=2925 Mexico City: http://www.djapanesecars.com/nissan/nissan-leaf-serves-taxi-mexico-city.html Japan: http://cleantechnica.com/2012/04/14/japans-first-electric-taxi-project-kicks-off/ This is only some of the entries about the many Leaf Taxi's in Japan. They are consistently the highest mileage per day, 300+ KM/day in Carwings. Now if a taxi that is a Crown Vic pulls up and a Leaf pulls up right next to it, you are one person and a suitcase, and the fare for the Crown Vic taxi is 2X as much for the flag drop and the mileage than the Leaf taxi, which one you getting in?
      EZEE
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wow, I am glad I have government to nice again, protect me from my own choices in life, why, without them, I have no idea how I would know which taxi cab to take. How about, we keep our noses out of his business. Maybe I am dumb, but I imagine that if the cab driver and owner are short sighted e ought to strand people, then after a short period of time, they will go out of business, or buy Volts. It's called capitalism, and although out of fashion, it seems, it works quite well. Now forgive me, I need to use my Obama phone to call my buddies prior to going to the free clinic, and from there I will get food via my food stamps, pick up my child from the government supplied daycare, get my free condoms so my girlfriend doesn't have to go to the doctor for another abortion paid for by people who actually work because I didn't feel like pulling out in time. My place is oretty nice. i was renting it but stopped paying, and since i have squatter's rights, i dont have to leave. Thankfully, 53% of the American people pay income taxes, so I can do all this great stuff. Sorry sorry, rant over. Just kills me some dumbass committee does this stuff to prevent someone from actually trying to do something good. And if he failed, it would be his money, not mine.
        Ford Future
        • 2 Days Ago
        @EZEE
        Wacky Bulls***? Since when did we request the Rush Limbaugh show on this blog. EZEE, you'd better start reading the NYTIMES, you guys on the right forgot that Fox Lies is a propaganda site, and started to believe their bull.
          EZEE
          • 2 Days Ago
          @Ford Future
          So I can get economic advice from former Enron Advisor, Paul krugman? As I have said ad nauseum, I do not have cable, so I never watch any cable news. Not fox, msnbc, abc, CNN, etc. Notice, however how you classify and stereotype. Your own propaganda says say is wrong. If you don't believe your own propaganda, why should others?
        amtoro
        • 2 Days Ago
        @EZEE
        Easy, EZEE... I agree that it is stupid that government officials (which, by the way, can be of either party and at any position in any local, state or federal office) try to argument that just because a vehicle *might* not make it round trip to a destination, then it should not be used. Let's stop blaming the president for what low level officials do in Arlington, VA. Is our job to elect good and reasonable people for public positions. (Obviously, as this article indicates, we have not done a good job in many cases) This is as ridiculous as blocking the Greyhound lines from operating just because the bus might not make it from Chicago to Detroit and back.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 2 Days Ago
        @EZEE
        +1!! Too bad most people think that daddy ( government ) knows best even while he's strip searching you at an airport or taking your money and using it to blow the faces off children in Pakistan. Just blows my mind! All hail the power of the state! don't deregulate no matter what! the more regulations, the better our society is!
        Dave D
        • 2 Days Ago
        @EZEE
        I know you were ranting, but some of that stuff was a bit well...you know better. I've seen you make lots of conservative posts on here and many I even agree with. But that was a bit much. My grandparents owned textile factories and I remember going into them as a kid and they were literally sweat shops. Ok, maybe they were sweating because they were in South Alabama and there was no air conditioning back then. But seriously, I watched people sit at their sewing machines in huge open floor factories working like the devil himself was standing over them waiting to beat them. They got paid by how many dresses/skirts/blouses they could crank out in a day and they clearly all needed the money because they WORKED. Now I sit here as an executive in a technology company and we have areas we call "production" where I walk back there and these people are so intensely working at their computers trying to crank through data that I realize these are the same people. They may be using computers and sitting in air conditioned buildings now, but I have NEVER even walked in that part of the building and not been astounded that NOBODY is talking, joking, taking a break, NOTHING. They are working as hard and fast as their little fingers can sort through PDFs, jpg, etc. I always get flash backs to those sewing machines. Why do I mention this? Because frankly they are unskilled workers using a computer to do their job. So they get paid like ****. They work much harder than I do, yet I know that most of them don't make enough money to pay income tax., BUT THEY PAY PAYROLL TAX. They work their ass off and they and the people like them who work at every Walmart, Target, restaurants and all these other jobs we take for granted get paid so little that they end up paying little or no income tax. That 47% also include students and retired people that damn sure earned the money they're collecting now because they paid into social security their whole lives. Fact: 53% of the people paid income taxes last year. Fact, another 31% pay payroll tax (in other words they work but don't make enough to pay income tax). That's a total of 84% working to pay for their own stuff, the best they can. (Tax Policy Center numbers). I hate what this committee did as much as you do. But we can't keep saying things like that about the "47%" or it starts to become "fact" in our heads if we say it enough times and everyone gets a picture of 47% of Americans sitting around collecting welfare checks and watching free cable TV. And they REALLY start to believe it.
          EZEE
          • 2 Days Ago
          @Dave D
          Te payroll tax thing is interesting. For years and years, we were told that it wasn't a tax. You were paying into your account, so it wasn't a tax! Now, after Johnson allowed the government to raid the trust fund and spend the money, all ssn is put into the general government funding, and we essentially have a pyramid scheme. So in that, you are right. They really ARE taxes. Now the question is, why do we start calling them taxes now? Or, why did the, 'these aren't taxes' propaganda stop? Simple. Since 47% of the people pay no income taxes, we need a way to buy more votes. How do we do that? We start calling these taxes, taxes, and then we offer tax cuts to the poor and lower middle class. So soon, people will collect social security and other benefits that they ever paid nothing, or very little into. This is not a good idea, as it means fewer people will be paying into the system, which considering the state of the program, is a REALLY bad idea. But you heard it here first....wait until they talk about it - it will happen. @Ford Hey buddy! Hadn't seen you for a while. Can't remember where you lived, so was hoping it wasn't the northeast....
          Ford Future
          • 2 Days Ago
          @Dave D
          If all Republicans were like Dave D. this could be a great country for 100% of America.
          Dave D
          • 2 Days Ago
          @Dave D
          EZEE, Agreed, for the most part. But the bottom line is these people are not "free loaders", they work, and many of them work two jobs to get by and I don't like them being talked about as "the 47%" or "those people". I sit in Board meetings and listen to rich idiots say things like that all the time. They literally talk about those people in Production like they're lazy thieves and you have to watch them or they'll come in late and not work. I've never seen them do anything BUT work hard so what are we worried about? they're going to get over on us for $7.25? LOL We don't think a thing about flying everyone in for a mgt meeting and going out to "team build" and spend $1,000 on the bar tab LOL There are DEFINITELY people collecting welfare and other benefits that don't need them. I have a lower level exec that works for me who is going to be laid off at Christmas because his area was offshored. (yes, disgusting I know. Couldn't stop them as the Board thinks they are going to save money...and it's not even true! Anway...) So I was talking with him last week and worried so I offered to use my connections to help him get a job. But he was very happy with the fact that he had saved up some money, plus he had enough separation pay and then after that, unemployment...that he could take most of the year off. I asked him if he was serious about the collecting unemployment and he said: "yes, I've been paying taxes all my life so I'm going to get some of it back now". I didn't know what to say to that. I wasn't raised that way. That money is for people who are really in trouble so I don't know why he would even have that thought process going. Isn't it interesting to know that someone who's been making over $150k a year for the last 10 years is acting like the mythical "welfare queen" that Reagan made famous. And yes, he's white and "Republican". Maybe he's just frustrated and blowing off steam??? I hope so. We do need to cut spending and stop the cheating. But it sure won't hurt for those of us at the top to pay a little more. At least it's not going to kill me.
        SVX pearlie
        • 2 Days Ago
        @EZEE
        @EZEE: "I imagine that if the cab driver and owner are short sighted e ought to strand people" Perhaps the company goes out of business, but it's not just a risk to the company. It's a risk to the customers. If someone is trying to catch a flight, and they miss it because somebody ran out of range, or a taxi refused to take them, or they had to wait for another taxi, those are all harms that the customer suffers. Given that the fare is not present, and has little choices once those taxis are on the road, it is not unreasonable to have some caution.
          tagberto
          • 2 Days Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          What happens if the crown vic runs out of gas? Be cautious.
      paulwesterberg
      • 2 Years Ago
      If the taxi operator wants to take the risk, buy the cars, install the chargers it sounds like he has run the numbers and found that he can make it work with fast charging and low operating costs. I just did a google maps search of the route, Washington Monument to Dules Airport and got these routes: 26.7 mi, 33 mins(In current traffic: 41 mins).... means an average speed of 39mph 27.9 mi, 33 mins(In current traffic: 1 hour 2 mins).... means an average speed of 27mph These routes are on major roads, but traffic is horrible so the average speed is very slow. EVs excel at this type of urban driving and would provide much more efficient transportation than your average gasser(crown vic taxis get 13mpg). And when a professional driver is driving at speeds between 27-39mph they will probably be able to drive much farther than the EPA estimated electric vehicle range. Here is the business plan for a local hybrid taxi system - they estimate that hybrid mileage will be 3 times better than traditional taxi vehicles. http://legistar.cityofmadison.com/attachments/59eb47af-e4f7-4efb-92d1-affe6771ed1e.pdf
        atc98092
        • 2 Years Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        I doubt the google map takes the airport freeway into consideration in its time calculations. Over half that distance is reserved for traffic to/from Dulles Airport, with no tolls and no direct on/off ramps. I imagine average speeds for to/from the airport would be closer to 45-50MPH over the total distance.
          SVX pearlie
          • 2 Years Ago
          @atc98092
          Note that this is suburban Arlington, VA, not the city of Washington, DC. Depending on where the fare picks up, the one-way distance can be closer to 30 miles. OTOH, milk runs between the Pentagon and Washington National are a perfect match, and that's probably what the operator was hoping for.
        SVX pearlie
        • 2 Years Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        @paul: "If the taxi operator wants to take the risk, buy the cars, install the chargers" I'm generally OK with this. The taxicab commission issue is if a fare wants to go to Dulles, but ends up stranded en route. Or the driver refuses to run adequate heat during the winter to preserve battery / range. Or the driver wants to refuse a long-range fare because of potential range issues. These are possible scenarios which are somewhat problematic, and affect the efficiency of the idea. Tradeoffs that private owners are free to make may not be acceptable to a taxi commission that needs to guarantee a consistent level of service to all fares. Requiring every EV taxi to hold a range sufficient to reach Dulles probably defeats the economic point of using an EV in the first place, because the Taxi would be constantly topping off to hedge against a fare that might never come. OTOH, if the Leaf Taxi could be limited and identified for local "in-town" use only, that would be a different issue, much more efficient.
      Marco Polo
      • 2 Years Ago
      If Malik Khattak thinks he can make a fleet of Nissan Leaf taxi's work, good luck to him ! For the Leaf to be used as a taxi, would really help the reputation of EV's in the public consciousness. However, let's be realistic, the Nissan Leaf is not the ideal vehicle to be a taxi. Although the most unlikely vehicles do get drafted as taxis, taxi design should be based on the function of the vehicle, not just adapting the cheapest production vehicle available to become a taxi. Taxi's need certain design features; 1) Roomy enough to accommodate 4 passengers (even oversize ) plus a driver. 2) Comfortable, and secure space for the driver 3) Easy egress fro the driver, and ease of Luggage handling. 4) Very strong chassis and suspension. 5) Up graded crash protection 6) Easily repaired and maintained 7) Long engine/battery life 8) Very good air-conditioning, including particle filtration. 9) Low running costs 10) Luggage capacity 11) Least down time 12) Versatility, Child capsules, wheel chair etc. This list is by no means complete, but it's obvious that the Leaf fails most of the requirements. Passengers who engage taxi's deserve to be provided with the best and most suitable vehicles available, and not forced to accept substandard vehicles. The argument against the adoption of properly designed cabs, has always been the cost. With a few exceptions, (UK's London Cab, and the old US Checker Cab company) most taxi's are just the cheapest popular sedan available. In theory, this means that more drivers can be owners, and taxi fares will be cheaper. But in fact, the opposite is true. When quality standards for taxi's (and drivers) are improved, the industry becomes more productive and fares remain affordable.
        Turbo Froggy
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        Mallik has certainly already thought of all of that. The Leaf can handle taxi duty, it is already doing it in Japan. He isn't going to put down millions of dollars into something that he doesn't think will work. Prius's are in use in LARGE taxi fleets without issue and they are smaller inside than a Leaf. I'll go though all your points below: 1. Leaf can accommodate 5 passengers, however the taxi service could certainly send two Leafs to pickup a big group. They could still do it at 1/10th the cost of their competitors so at 1/5th to send two cars isn't a big deal. Also they could equip their fleet with several e-NV200s for larger capacity. 2. Check, Leaf is roomy and comfortable. I have spent 8+ hours in our Leaf on a 300 mile trip. 3. Leaf has a very deep trunk space that is easily loaded though the keyless entry to the hatch. 4. Leaf has a much better suspension than a standard Prius due to the heavier batteries. 5. Leaf has 5 star crash rating and IIHS Top Safety pick, it is already higher rated than most cars on the road. 6. Leaf has almost no maintenance requirement beyond tire rotation. 7. "Engine" life isn't an issue, battery should last 8/100K miles to 80% capacity. Beyond that more frequent fast charging might be required but the cars will still be serviceable. 8. Leaf has very good air conditioning and an adequate heating system. Heating can be supplemented by heated seats, which most taxi's just don't have. 9. Leaf is 1/6th to 1/10th the cost per mile of any other taxi on the road. 10. Leaf has a deep luggage area that can accommodate several pieces of luggage. 11. With very little maintenance Leafs can stay in service 24/7 with driver rotation in multiple shifts. 12. Child "capsules" if you mean car seats, they can be fitted to the rear seats using standard anchors that come in the car. For Wheelchair, if it folds it can go in the back, otherwise send for the e-NV200. So I disagree with all your points. Prius taxis are in use in several fleets and they were originally dismissed by many people as well as not fit for taxi duty. This has been proven thoroughly incorrect.
        Nick
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        Marco Polo In Europe, taxis are regular cars, they do not need 'hardcore suspension', a huge trunk, 5 oversized bucket seats and special doors. And guess what, no one complains about it. The Leaf would be a good taxi overall (not taking range into consideration).
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        Model S would be a good taxi. Perhaps a town car service.
      Marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ezee, It's not that the Leaf is unsuitable to be used as a cab because it's an EV, it's because it's an inherently inefficient vehicle for it's purpose. The Nissan Tiilda/Versa or VW Golf, would be equally unsuitable. Taxi Boards/Commissions, are the same as any public licencing regulatory body. They exist because the general public demanded a regulated industry. Governments have a role in regulating industry on behalf of consumers. With only a limited number of taxi licences, the idea of selecting an unsuitable vehicle to be issued a taxi licence simply because it's an EV, would be as irresponsible as issuing a licence to an unsuitable ICE vehicle. It also prevents the industry developing purpose built EV's designed solely for taxi usage. If public transport is to be more effective, and efficient to attract more usage, it needs to provide a better facility for both the driver, and the passenger. Pretending that a small commuter car, can function in a role that it's not designed for, simply out of sentiment is not helpful. The concept of designing a purpose built EV taxi for metropolitan area's is usually opposed by the major car company's as it heavily affects the viability of sales for their larger models. As long as any standard model saloon, EV or ICE, can be drafted for Taxi duty, (no matter how unsuitable), purpose built Taxi's will never be produced economically, and the whole industry suffers.
        EZEE
        • 2 Days Ago
        @Marcopolo
        'It also prevents the industry developing purpose built EV's designed solely for taxi usage. ' What is wrong with air purpose built EV for taxi's? Checker had a purpose built ICE (the marathon) for years).
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Days Ago
          @EZEE
          @ Ezee Checker, London Cab's (Hackneys) and several others built highly successful specialized vehicles for years. These vehicles were very good in their day, and were finally driven out of business by the major car manufacturers selling large sedans in very basic form, at very low prices. Checker, London Cabs etc, simply couldn't compete. Since the demise of the specialists, Taxi fleets have been fitting the customers to the taxi, not the taxi to the customer. Such a policy makes for a cheaper initial purchase price for the taxi owner, and is good for the manufacturers of large sedans, but is ultimately bad for the industry as a whole. The PRC's BYD EV taxi, is a pretty unimaginative, sub-standard, cheap vehicle, but it does show what could be built with imagination and good design. EV technology, is very suitable for metropolitan taxi use. But EV taxi's need to be designed to include all the features a taxi needs. London's Mayor Boris Johnson, recently announced the withdrawal of taxi permits for old or pollutant taxi's. Unfortunately, this has had unintended consequences. Because no design specifications, the make of the iconic London Black Cab, was forced out of business. Imports became the order of the day, along with a rise in demand for de-regulated mini-cabs, and 50 BYD taxi's. VW designed and built a prototype for a specialized EV taxi. Although no longer than the BYD, it included many more features and was considerably roomier ! It didn't go into production because it could compete on price with BYD. Both Nissan (NV 200) and Mercedes Vito, can be built in EV versions, but again it comes down to cost. Disability advocates are using discrimination laws to fight the introduction of unsuitable taxi's. Legislation such as the The Ontarian's with Disabilities Act 2005, would make a fleet of Leaf Taxi's, ineligible for a licence in Ontario. In the UK, the Disability Discrimination Act 2005, will used to prevent the BYD's from obtaining a Hackney Licences. But none of these well intentioned regulations, is worth a damn, if there is no suitable production EV available. The New York Taxi Commission spent $3 million running a competition for the "Taxi of Tomorrow" . Many interesting and practical EV designs were entered (as well as some whacko), but in the end, what was chosen ? The Nissan four cylnder NV200 ! This is one area governments possess the power to level the playing field for EV's ! In most parts of the world the taxi industry is controlled by Licencing. Regulatory authorities have existing power to impose design standards, including EV (or at least EREV) drive-trains. With a market created, the auto-industry would eagerly respond by producing imaginative vehicles to meet demand, and beat the competition. Governments already have the necessary regulatory power, to improve the quality of the taxi industry, all it needs the political will !
          DaveMart
          • 2 Days Ago
          @EZEE
          Inductive charging is the zinger for electric cabs. Taxi rank, meet inductive charging while you are waiting! OT, but interestingly, there are proposals for a London EV race, and they are considering using inductive charging! http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1080312_londons-olympic-park-to-be-venue-for-electric-car-race-series
        EZEE
        • 2 Days Ago
        @Marcopolo
        Consumers regulate the industry daily with their decisions. Yes, we don't want strip mining in Yellowstone, now jets falling out of the air. But I also don't want to get a Zune when I prefer an iPod. If the vehicle is inefficient for the purpose, then fine, they fail. I have no problem with that. No bail out if they do. But my inner libertarian would rather have the choice.
      EVSUPERHERO
      • 2 Years Ago
      They should have digital signs on the outside of all the cabs that show how much range they have left. " This cab good for 50 miles only".
      xuanvu
      • 2 Years Ago
      TESLA MODEL S and later TESLA MODEL X are perfect taxis the Leaf is crap.
      Marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      @ Turbo froggy, We seem to be arguing at cross-purposes, I didn't say any vehicle can't be used as a taxi, I simply stated the obvious, and said some vehicle are not the most suitable for use as taxi's. I want to see a properly designed EV taxi replace ICE taxi's, but drafting an unsuitable EV into service is just making the same mistakes as ICE vehicles. VW Beetles are also used as taxi's, but do you really think they constitute a well designed taxi? But this is what comes of you relying the overly optimistic articles in 'green car reports" for your info ! 1) Seattle. Seattle is an exception. Since 1980, it's one of the few cities in the world with a de-regulated taxi industry. Still the largest taxi operator in Seattle, Yellow Cabs, (380 taxi's) owns a small number of Prius ( 17), nothing like 95% ! 2) London. These Leafs are not taxi's ! It was a PR exercise for 100 days by Nissan. 3) San Paulo : 2 Leaf test vehicles, (with another 8 maybe's) in a city of over 70,000 taxi's ! 4) Mexico City has 20 Leaf Taxis out of 34,000 official taxi's and another 25,000, unregulated. These are not Taxi 'Fleet's' ! But, It does show the need for EV taxi's, just not the Leaf. It's sad that Leaf is currently the only production EV available. Taxi fleets need EV taxis ! But they need an economical, properly designed, purpose built, EV taxi.
      pmpjunkie01
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wow, what happened to the free market again. Just because a competitor (EnviroCab) doesn't think it works they prohibit a new company. I hope the county board overturns that decision.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        @pmpjunkie01
        News flash, America is now #10 in economic freedom ( google it ), And has gradually stopped operating as a free market in the early 1900's. If you want to see a free market in action, look at Hong Kong. Enjoy crony capitalism!
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