Yesterday's announcement that American Suzuki has filed for bankruptcy is all but a death blow for the Japanese automaker's 246 US dealers, but if there's any good news coming out of the situation, it could be the fact that the whole process will likely be quick and painless rather than drawn out. WardsAuto is reporting that with the current inventory and average sales numbers so far this year, there figures to be about three months left for Suzuki's new-car business in the US given current sales rates.

In October, Suzuki sold 2,023 units – a five percent increase over last year – but with just 5,549 left in inventory, it shouldn't take too long to wind down operations. Sales for the brand peaked 2007 with more than 100,000 units sold, but this year, Suzuki is barely on pace to reach a quarter of that amount, with just 21,188 units sold so far in 2012. In addition to poor sales, WardsAuto also notes that Suzuki faced problems due to its reliance on customers with subprime credit.

Suzuki will continue to sell motorcycles, ATVs and marine engines in the US, while the brand's cars will still be on sale in other countries including Canada and Mexico.


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  • 28 Comments
      fefifofum
      • 2 Years Ago
      Saw a Kizashi out today, looked nice. Hope they can get parts in 10 years.
        Synthono
        • 2 Years Ago
        @fefifofum
        If all else fails, you could source from India, where Suzuki does well.
          KC
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Synthono
          Or you could go north or south of the US border.
      Carpinions
      • 2 Years Ago
      A brand that ill-served itself by 1) trying to make vendors out of many competitors, 2) not releasing their better cars globally, especially in the US, 3) have apparently no marketing department, and 4) realizing years too late that their US sales were horrid. The Kizashi is a nice and nice-looking little ride, but it should have come out 8-10 years ago - around the time they introduced the Verona/Forenza/Reno era - not around the same time GM, Chrysler, and Ford figured their crap out and started being competitive, and not 7 or so years after Nissan changed its tune and started kicking lots of @ss. Also, marketing the Kizashi with its level of equipment against the Audi A4 and a motorized sofa seems to, oh I dunno, miss the target market, which is that sweet spot that everyone else's marketing hits far more directly, as evidenced by sales in the 6-figure range. A commercial like that may be OK for short-run Super Bowl fare, but it won't sway the Camry or Accord buyer, because it makes your car look like it's fit for the college audience. I like the look of the Kizashi a lot. Never driven one, but apparently it's pretty good. But the 3-syllable name and sound, the fact that it's the smallest thing in its segment, and the fact that it's not an MPG leader, let alone the absence of any marketing, dooms their final, best but marginally competitive global offering, to failure. I guess they can rest their laurels on having made it this far though, with so many factors working against them.
      mikeybyte1
      • 2 Years Ago
      Too bad. They had some cool products.
      Cruising
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's a shame the "S" is going away. The direction they were taking the company they should have hooked up with Subaru. They could have easily developed some small fun to drive hatches, wagons, compact cars.
      mikoprivat
      • 2 Years Ago
      good riddance...nobody will miss it, just like nobody would miss toyota, honda and the other POS asian krap that's being dumped on us europeans and especially dumb americans
        GR
        • 2 Years Ago
        @mikoprivat
        Really? If there were no Asian cars left, I would stop driving and ride a bicycle. It would be more reliable.
          Basil Exposition
          • 2 Years Ago
          @GR
          Didn't think it was possible to make a response as idiotic as the original comment, but you did it GR - congrats!
      Vergenbuurg
      • 2 Years Ago
      Trying to hook up with VW is the worst thing Suzuki ever did in regards to their future as a viable car brand in America... Well, VW successfully killed one of many competitors in the marketplace, so good for them, I guess...
        ishmaelcrowley
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Vergenbuurg
        I guess they are following the Daimler example. Daimler almost killed Chrysler.
      Scooter
      • 2 Years Ago
      Suzuki did build a good a interior that was worlds better than a Kia/Hyundai car. They just never hit the mark with performance or designs. They never identified themselves as any specialty brand. Honda/Toyota market their brands as reliable and trusty, yet Suzuki never quite found a way to describe themselves. I hoped Kizashi would be a game changer for them, but Kizashi somehow came out the womb wearing the face of a last gen VW Jetta with a side profile screaming "budget car!", yet the rear was fierce and sporty with a great double exhaust design. Kizashi being their last true new vehicle for the U.S. it was evident that their company was going forward without a solid plan. Kizashi is that new kid that could never fit in quite well. I would blame Suzuki's desmise squarely on its confusing public identity.
      sinistro79
      • 2 Years Ago
      I thought that only Nissan had to worry about customers with sub-prime credit but I guess I was wrong. Nearly all of the Nissan dealerships in California operate under the slogan, "No Credit, No Problem!" One thing that Nissan has over Suzuki is style...not much, its something. They can ride on that superiority only for so long however. Many of their buyers can't afford to wash their own cars and after awhile, they're going to run the risk of people perceiving their vehicles based on how they see them driving through the streets of Los Angeles. Nissan should take note of what's happening to Suzuki and stop this nonsense of giving everybody with no credit a car to drive.
        tinted up
        • 2 Years Ago
        @sinistro79
        sinistro you couldn't be more far from the truth. Nissan Motor Acceptance Corporation does NOT usually give loans to sub prime buyers. There is a minuscule chance of getting approved if between 550 and 600 and a nonexistent chance of getting approved if less than 550. Nissan DOES have first time buyer programs for some vehicles IF the applicant does NOT have open collections on their credit report. Mitsubishi Suzuki and Chrysler are the bottom feeders of sub prime lending. Get your facts straight or GTFO
        Gubbins
        • 2 Years Ago
        @sinistro79
        How is it you have all this bad business practice info on Nissan dealerships?
      Mikey
      • 2 Years Ago
      Believe it or not, but the model I'm going to remember them for most is the 96-98 Suzuki X-90. I mean, seriously, it's not everyday you see someone put a two-seat convertible on the market that looks like an SUV-pickup. Decent standard equipment too (For it's time). I read somewhere that it was basically a concept car put into production at the last minute lol.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        GR
        • 2 Years Ago
        They will be missed by people like me who have actually owned one. The real Suzukis are tough, reliable, value-driven vehicles. Their flaws were more in management and marketing in the US, not so much their cars. They offered the most affordable AWD vehicle in the US. These cars are quite loved by their owners. Suzuki also offered the last compact real SUV. While everyone else went with soft-roaders with optional AWD, Suzuki stuck with a ladder frame and full range 4WD. I have owned a Subaru and a Suzuki. The Suzuki is the one you want to take offroad if you want to guarantee a return. The only limitation of a Suzuki Sidekick vs. a Jeep Wrangler was ground clearance. I would know. I offroaded my stock Suzuki beside Jeeps for years. Trolls like you can hate, but you actually don't know much about the cars you hate on. It's quite evident. While you make comments like, "but the world will also live just fine (and much more efficiently) without them." you probably are ignorant to the fact that Suzuki has created the most efficient non hybrid, non diesel passenger vehicle engine in the world. Suzuki is a top seller in Japan, where efficiency is a priority. But of course, you have no idea. I don't know what you drive, but I am pretty sure that Suzuki owners like myself get way more out of our vehicles that we paid less for compared to people like you. Getting more from paying less: that's the definition of value. That was Suzuki for me and many owners. That's something worth missing.
      2o6
      • 2 Years Ago
      I love the Kizashi. I just think it's too expensive. Sized like a compact, priced like a Midsize.
        GR
        • 2 Years Ago
        @2o6
        It's actually bigger than a compact, yet only a little smaller than a normal mid-size. Think the first gen Mazda6; a more compact midsize. I went from a Mazda3 (compact) to a Kizashi. Big difference in space. World of difference in comfort. If you think the Kizashi is too expensive, I am guessing you have not actually sat in one for too long. Go look at the refinement of the thing and all the standard features. Also drive it. Then compare it to others in its class. It's actually a steal. Now that Suzuki is leaving, these cars can only get cheaper. I just don't think all midsize cars need to go the way of bloated bodies just to look like the other midsizes. This happened with the Mazda6 and Subaru Legacy and now they are too big. I actually really like my Kizashi for its just right proportions. It's hard to be in a bloated car and feel sporty. The Kizashi's size, chassis, and suspension work great to make it a real top-handler in its class.
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