When we say the worst of Hurricane Sandy has passed, we're only talking about the weather phenomena; the depth of the storm's other impacts will take time to measure. Many of the estimated 4,751 car dealers in the states affected by Sandy spent the run-up to the storm moving their inventory to high ground if possible and bracing their dealerships for the storm. Many had already been through Hurricane Irene had some practice, but, as one dealer said, the water levels before Sandy hit were already at Irene levels, so all they could do was hope they got it right.

It's not that there's ever a good time for a civilization-battering natural disaster, but for dealers, Hurricane Sandy coming at the end of the month was the worst possible time. These last few days of the month are when they'd be discounting cars and courting shoppers to meet their monthly quotas. Luxury dealers might take the brunt of the hit, as a report in Bloomberg indicates that Volvo, BMW, Mercedes-Benz and Acura sell from 23 to 25 percent of their wares in New York, Washington and Philadelphia.

According to the The New York Times, as of Tuesday night there were eight million people without power due to the storm, 2.3 million of them in New York state and another 2.6 million in New Jersey. Power outages there might last the rest of the week, if not longer. The Washington Post reported that the D.C. area is getting back to business, but it was shut down entirely for two days. Elsewhere, it's been reported that "the Northeast back to business," but that's the business of cleaning up, not the business of selling cars.

The 'good' news, relatively speaking, for dealers and the luxury makers is that Hurricane Sandy didn't change analysts' sales predictions for the month, nor the year. October is traditionally the slowest month of the year anyway, and the annualized rate of 14.8 to 14.9 million 2012 sales might be a little soggy, but appears to have emerged intact.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 25 Comments
      rmkensington
      • 2 Years Ago
      I would think there would be a slow down for about a month. But once everyone starts getting their insurance checks they will be out looking for a replacement.
      Josh
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'd be more worried about the typical NYDAS crap - I wouldn't be surprised if Major starts selling flood damaged cars as 'used'.
        Richard
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Josh
        yes this is a huge bonanza for Major World...good call!
      Thrice
      • 2 Years Ago
      Anybody who left their car in the flood zone areas deserves to get a big, fat zero of an insurance payout. Nobody can argue that Sandy was an unforeseen circumstance.
        Spiel
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Thrice
        You're an idiot. I'd rather spend the effort, time and planning on keeping my family safe rather than worry about my cars which can be replaced, and mind you I love my cars.
        MechE
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Thrice
        And what is considered a flood zone? Certainly right next to a body of water, yes. However, for example in the picture above, were people expecting the entire city (which isnt a flood zone) to flood over? And even if they were, what are they supposed to do, drive all their cars to a different region for safe keeping?
          Thrice
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MechE
          Considering NOAA had a pretty good idea of where the hurricane was headed, well in advance of landfall, people had plenty of time to move their cars to a different region. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2012/graphics/al18/loop_3W.shtml (Pretty accurate forecast of the hurricane track issued on Saturday, Oct 27th, 5am EST) And yes, they were expecting severe floods - why else would they issue evacuations?
          MechE
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MechE
          Agree with Speil's first sentence (and following sentences). 1) Nobody knew where the storm was going to hit until about 18 hours before it hit. Before that it was only a chance. All they would show is the current location and then a HUGE array of paths including being swept out to sea. And mind you, people still had to go about their business before the storm - WORK for example. You can't stop and runaway from home every time they call for snow. 2) When people actually did get accurate notice, they arent worried about their car. In my case, I have 4 cars. Am I supposed to get in all 4 cars and drive them from MD to Ohio to save them. No, if possible move them away from the river or low area. Otherwise pack up and leave. And I say drive it to a different region because there was no area within the entire Northeast with 100% certain safe for a car. We're not talking cars parked 20' from the ocean were damaged. Entire cities flooded! Your car could have been miles from the nearest lake and still flooded or hit by debris. 3) Evacuation is leave to save yourself and your loved ones, not save the cars from damage. In any case, people will get their insurance checks, and they deserve to get them because they have insurance for this very reason! You could also say anyone who gets in a car accident should get ZERO money from insurance. They knew there was a chance of getting into an accident before driving. Why did they drive then??? By they way, I'm not defensive because I had any damage. I just know if I did there wasnt anything I could have done about it beforehand.
        Sami
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Thrice
        Seriously? what's wrong with you dude. What if someone was sick, or out of town, or even freaken on duty like a fireman or police officer. Where the heck ppl should go? Such a mindless thoughts.
      zizixx89
      • 2 Years Ago
      my aunts maxima was just like that and she thinks she has to get a new car but i had to save it
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      AndrewNoNumbers
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wait, but what about all the luxury buyers who will see a bit of mud and scratches on the Mercs and decide to buy a new one?
      enderstc
      • 2 Years Ago
      Now's the time to go buy a car if you live in that area! I bet you could get an awesome deal right now (assuming the dealership is even open).
        Josh
        • 2 Years Ago
        @enderstc
        I wouldn't recommend you buy one here right after what happened. If you wanna talk unscrupulous and untrustworthy dealers NY is a great way to see examples of them. BEWARE FLOOD DAMAGED CARS SOLD AS UNTITLED!!!!
      Erik
      • 2 Years Ago
      Don't a good number of luxury marques have their US headquarters in Jersey too?
      Maddoxx
      • 2 Years Ago
      Actually it can be a good time for dealers, ppl whose car got destroyed will need to be replaced. So ppl will need to buy cars to replace them, insurance money!!
      clarissaclara
      • 2 Years Ago
      I know i"ve been waiting on mine a long time.CDH
      FuelToTheFire
      • 2 Years Ago
      So, I live in Jersey City. And I usually park my STi in my friend's garage. The garage was damaged during Sandy,and both my friend's car as well as mine were totaled.
      clarissaclara
      • 2 Years Ago
      I know they are great cars I"ve been waiting a long time for one
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