We told you last time that Jessi and Patrick still had some items to check off The List after picking up a car from BMW via European delivery. They had to make their way from BMW's headquarters in Munich to a certain race track, and when in Germany, there's only one road that's worth taking to get where you're going: the Autobahn.

Our intrepid hosts have already achieved the feat of driving 200 miles per hour, but in this latest of The List, they're looking to challenge that number on Germany's most famous public road. To do it they needed the help of Alpina and its incredible B7 sedan. Large, powerful and stable, the B7 is our hosts' best chance to tame the Autobahn.

Watch the latest episode of The List, and stay tuned in the coming weeks for the last episode from our trip to Germany that you won't want to miss.



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Click here to learn more about our hosts, Jessi and Patrick.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 93 Comments
      Ricky
      • 2 Years Ago
      Did it in a white Scirocco R back in April... Word of advice to my fellow Americans: expose yourself to this blissful expanse of asphalt and concrete at your own risk; now every mile I travel on US roads is just another letdown :(
        El Duque
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ricky
        I drove some Autobahn this summer. It really is amazing. The roads are very well taken care of, drivers are courteous and move out of the way, and people don't generally drive crazy. It was a little confusing to me at first to figure out when there was a speed limit and when there wasn't, but you kind of get the gist of it after a while, and paying attention to the signs.
          Ricky
          • 2 Years Ago
          @El Duque
          We referred to the circle-with-three-diagonal-lines as the "Magic Sign" :) But yes, I have to say, I felt 10x more focused cruising at 110mph than I do back here in the US at 65mph, because I had to be. I think for this reason, roads over there are just as safe, if not safer, despite the higher rate of travel.
      Phil Springer
      • 2 Years Ago
      300 kph in the rain? And that's why the Germans think Americans are idiots! Thanks for proving them right.
      james
      • 2 Years Ago
      I just was over there driving the stretch form Munich to Stuttgart...hard to get up to speed in between the construction zones... I found that about 180-185 km/hr was a good cruising speed. I never had to flash lights; everyone kept to the right. Much more polite drivers than here in the US.
      Just Stuff
      • 2 Years Ago
      Finally something on their list that I've done. Used to love to take out my lieutenant as he was so scared he left fingerprint indentations on my dash. Standard cruise speed in my Celica XT was 100mph. Got a chance to take out my colonel's 928, what a ride. It was hard coming back to the U.S.
      brux2dc
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ummmm.... I am 99.9% sure that leaving the left turn signal on is illegal. It's aggressive driving. We could all drive like the Germans if we had driving tests as hard and rigorous as the Germans have! Driving in the US is an exercise in self-control every time I drive.
      Norm
      • 1 Year Ago
      Having driven in some 15 countries, the worst drivers I've encountered are in Southern California. Tailgating, slow drivers driving in the fast lane and refusing to move over for faster traffic, and non-usage of signals for lane changes are common occurrences by the minute. I felt MUCH safer doing 140 on the Autobahn, than I do going 65 on S. Cal freeways. In addition, no one drives around with a gun in their car like here in the U.S. You don't have to worry that some freak will shoot you for no good reason. Those events are non-existent in Europe. Here in the U.S. it happens every day. Such a shame.
      gseager
      • 1 Year Ago
      Having been a passenger in a BMW moving at 135 MPH on the Autobahn, I was impressed at the cooperation of other motorists who moved out of the way to let us by. Contrast that with the mentality of American drivers who hinder the passage of faster traffic by idling along in the express lane. No respect for other drivers means they get no respect from me. A line of traffic held up for miles by one slow motorist is inexcusable.
      mix35
      • 2 Years Ago
      Did Performance Delivery in March of this year. Will have to do a Welt Delivery and drive the autobahn one of these days
      N2
      • 1 Year Ago
      BOOOOORING! Most of the film was inside the cabin with the drivers talk talk talking away. You never got to experience the speed of the left lane. I drove it as well as Italy Rome to Florence. The autobahn is an adrenaline rush, they made it feel like a typical ride home. Less them more road!
      Z
      • 2 Years Ago
      Definitely on my to-do list some day
      mix35
      • 2 Years Ago
      Am I mistaken or is the car they showed saying it was the signature alpina blue was a dark blue B7? Isn't Alpina blue a light blue? In any event I am jealous of them. Well not really. Yes I am - lol
      Norm
      • 1 Year Ago
      Just one more salient point about driving in Europe, in general, versus driving here in the US. You'll notice that the Autobahn speed runs were done IN THE RAIN! Their roads are designed to drain water off the road efficiently, not like poorly designed American freeways, so there is no hydroplaning. I, myself, did 85 in the rain on an Irish freeway, in a Nissan Micra, a small economy car not available in the US. I was being passed by other cars even at that speed, in the rain. The road wasn't slippery at all. Not one hint of hydroplaning. I wonder how many lives have been lost on American roads because of this problem, which is design based, and fixable.
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