Good news, everyone – the 2014 Chevrolet Silverado will, in fact, have headlights. And projector beam ones, at that. Chevrolet has chosen to release this specific teaser image of its next-gen pickup truck to "showcase the careful attention given to every detail."

We already knew that General Motors was planning to debut its new Silverado and GMC Sierra pickups at the Detroit Auto Show in January, but the automaker has now confirmed that the trucks will meet the world at a special event on December 13.

Aside from these new headlamps, the only other for-sure detail that we know about the new Silverado is that it will be powered by GM's new small-block V8 – an engine that we'll be seeing for the first time in just a few days. Rumors have suggested that smaller V6 engines will be on tap, as well, including a possible turbocharged unit to compete with the hot-selling 3.5-liter EcoBoost engine in the Ford F-150.

Rest assured, we'll be on hand at GM's event in December to bring you the full skinny on the new Silverado and its GMC Sierra twin.
Show full PR text
Next Generation Silverado to Debut in December

DETROIT – Chevrolet will take the wraps off the all-new Silverado 1500 full-size pickup on Dec. 13 at a special event in the Detroit area. The bold exterior design of the new Silverado reflects the enhanced capabilities of the truck while features such as jewel-like, projector beam headlamps showcase the careful attention given to every detail.

The new Silverado will be on public display for the first time at the 2013 North American International Auto Show in January, and will start production next year.

Founded in 1911 in Detroit, Chevrolet is now one of the world's largest car brands, doing business in more than 140 countries and selling more than 4 million cars and trucks a year. Chevrolet provides customers with fuel-efficient vehicles that feature spirited performance, expressive design and high quality. More information on Chevrolet models can be found at www.chevrolet.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 60 Comments
      thedriveatfive
      • 2 Years Ago
      like a rock.
      Drakkon
      • 2 Years Ago
      Optimus prime headlights!
      A. W. Lawson
      • 2 Years Ago
      Got that Transformer eyeball thing down...
      madlion8
      • 2 Years Ago
      Let's hear about a small displacement diesel and that ten speed you are working on with Ford.
      Avinash Machado
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hope they will give the Sierra a distinctive look rather than make it a barely rebadged Silverado.
      Cruising
      • 2 Years Ago
      looks a bit like the terminator eye.
      nosirrahg
      • 2 Years Ago
      Didn't one of those headlights wash up on the beach in Florida a few weeks ago?
      Brian Giron
      • 2 Years Ago
      looks like optimus prime took a self shot on instagram
        montoym
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Brian Giron
        Lol, I kind of got that impression as well. I like it.
      Paul
      • 2 Years Ago
      Small diesel please.
        thedriveatfive
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Paul
        The best way to take on ecoboost would be a small turbo diesel which could easily beat ecoboost economy and towing numbers.
        sloanm101
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Paul
        Agreed. Even a small diesel in the next gen SUVs will be very appreciated.
      avconsumer2
      • 2 Years Ago
      Here's hoping those headlights actually have "brights" instead of "high beams". (My 2012 Explorer has high beams - same luminosity, just a lens adjustment when you flick the switch - paltry, maybe, but I reeeally miss true "brights")
        creamwobbly
        • 2 Years Ago
        @avconsumer2
        I think you misunderstand what's happening when you flick that switch. "Brights" (a quaint term, akin to "emergency brake") describes one half of what's happening in both cases. "High beam" describes the other half. Maybe you don't like the brightness of your Explorer's high beam? Buy aftermarket bulbs then.
          GR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @creamwobbly
          No, avconsumer2 is correct. Go google what the headlight cluster looks like on a new Ford Explorer. There is no space for a high beam reflector, just a single projector lens. This means the headlight uses the same bulb for both high and low therefore, an additional high beam bulb does not exist. The same bulb is used with an upward angle to illuminate higher on the road in "high beam" mode. This set up saves space and money for the manufacturer and allows for "bi-xenon" where the HID bulb is used for high beam by tilting up. Traditionally, HID bulbs are not used in only high beam given that they require a warm-up and they don't do well being flickered on and off. That's why they are exclusively used in low-beam other than in bi-xenon applications. This is one bulb set-up is not as bright as a headlight with both a high beam bulb AND a low beam bulb that BOTH light up on "high beam" mode. You keep the low beams on while the additional light illuminates further down the road.
          avconsumer2
          • 2 Years Ago
          @creamwobbly
          Unfortunately, I believe I completely understand. It's got one bulb - with a dimmer capable of one wattage. Upon switch flick, without breaking out the light meter, it appears to simply remove a shade from the upper half of the lens - that's it. I can basically see things in the trees better - it's not brighter, & I definitely can't see further. "Brights" imply a higher wattage light source (than standard ) that outputs more lumina - which is not the case here. By this logic, an aftermarket (or brighter,) bulb would not really solve anything other than blinding oncoming traffic when my lamps jump above that practically useless half-height shade that covers the top half of the beam.
          GR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @creamwobbly
          avconsumer2, If I were you, I would consider an aftermarket HID kit. HIDs emit more light on the road. If you get a 4300k kit in your projector lens, it should provide a rather crisp, brighter white light. Just be sure to be vigilant in not blinding oncoming traffic. I have aftermarket HIDs and they definitely improve light output on the road.
        GR
        • 2 Years Ago
        @avconsumer2
        They just tilt up, right? Some car manufacturers seem to do this to save costs and make their headlights smaller. I also prefer actual independent high beams that supplement low beams.
          EXP Jawa
          • 2 Years Ago
          @GR
          A lot of applications are using a moving shutter to create the sharp vertical cutoff in the low beam mode, then retract it to fill in the upper half of the beam pattern for high beam mode. The trouble is that the optics are often focused (sorry, bad pun) on being a low beam. You wind up with a high beam that is essentially a low beam with more light in the upper area of the pattern, rather than a true high beam that has been optimized for better long range lighting.
          GR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @GR
          I've actually seen headlights where the bulb angle moves up, not just a cover. You can see this when you have the lights on against a nearby wall. Instead of additional lighting in "high beam", you just see an upward tilting move by the low beams when high beams are turned on.
          avconsumer2
          • 2 Years Ago
          @GR
          Yep! Agreed. Not a component they need to skimp on. The family of raccoons I nearly obliterated the other night concurs. ;P
      CEC
      • 2 Years Ago
      Taking the same design path they used with BumbleBee a decade ago is not a good idea. GM needs fresh new design language STAT.
        montoym
        • 2 Years Ago
        @CEC
        A decade ago, the Camaro was leaving production. Exaggerate much?
          CEC
          • 2 Years Ago
          @montoym
          I dont know if you are old enough to remember that the 5th generation Camaro concept was released January 2006. Considering it probably took a year to develop (late 2004 eairly 2005) and it is almost 2013, I considered 8 years"ish" is close enough to a decade to qualify. Sorry for not being literal enough.
      bluemoonric
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Silverado will get Sierra body panels and the Sierra will get Silverado body panels. Both will get new headlights.
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