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Highway etiquette states that slower moving vehicles stay to the right. Those slowpokes may want to stay off California highways altogether this Friday.

That's because Tesla Motors has declared October 19 as "Supercharging Day," when the electric-vehicle maker's first six fast chargers will be opened to the public, according to Hybrid Cars. Tesla announced the news via an e-mail to car owners.

The company's Superchargers, which fact charge at 90 kW and 440 volts, can put 150 miles into a top-of-the-line Model S 85-kWh battery in about a half-hour, or about as long as it takes from a Model S driven by a deranged owner to get from Palo Alto to San Francisco.

Earlier this month, Tesla said it's getting $10 million from the state to help prepare its Fremont, CA, factory to one day start making the Model X SUV there. That model is expected to see the light of day in 2014 and will be Supercharger-capable.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 29 Comments
      Ashton
      • 2 Years Ago
      "That model is expected to see the light of day in 2014 and will be Supercharger-capable." I was still under the impression that the Model X was going to begin being sold "late 2013"...did that deadline slip? As for the supercharger capable...I would bet every car after the model S will be supercharger capable.
        Grendal
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ashton
        The Model X only has the 60 kWh and 85 kWh packs available. Those are the same packs that have Supercharger access in the Model S. I expect that if there is a smaller pack in future cars, and there will be, that those won't have supercharger access either. But that's just my guess.
          bluepongo1
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Grendal
          The proof of concept X (the one in the photo on the other ABG thread.)and the crash tested X had the dual battery, dual motor configuration.
          Grendal
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Grendal
          I don't understand. Does that impact what I wrote? Dual battery? Or do you mean dual charger? My point was that the Gen III car might not have supercharger access for its smaller battery packs for the same reason that the 40 kWh pack in the Model S doesn't have it. I would expect a similar stategy as the Model S on a much larger scale.
        oktrader
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ashton
        Ashton: Only addressing your question about schedule slip: yes, that was discreetly slid under investors' doors in the Q2 10K on August 2nd (check p.23): "We currently plan to start deliveries of Model X in 2014. "
          Ashton
          • 2 Years Ago
          @oktrader
          oktrader - dang...that's disappointing. I wasn't planning on buying a Model X or anything...I just want Tesla to do good, and be fast. I hope to own a genIII one day...maybe a used one in 2017-18. Grendal - I agree that I think Romney will win (I'm a republican,FYI) come next month. I also agree that those incentives are going to go away pretty soon, at most a year from now. I just hope that Elon invites Romney to his plant in Silicon Valley and shows him the whole shabang, which I think will help a lot in changing his views on electric cars. As for a previous post of mine that you also responded to (about the GenIII not having supercharger access), I think it will, I bet the smallest pack that comes with it will be 60kw. That car is what is going to bring electric vehicles to the masses, and if you truly want to convince everyone that electric vehicles are ready for prime time, then you can't tell possible future customers that "you'll can be back on the road in just a few quick hours!" That won't fly with the average joe.
          Grendal
          • 2 Years Ago
          @oktrader
          Should Tesla survive, I've made the point on the Tesla forum that they need to get the Gen III out as quick as possible to take advantage of the $7500 tax credit. There is a huge difference between a $30K sedan that you charge $30K for and a $37,400 car that you charge $30K for. In 2016, I expect a Republican candidate to win and wiping out the incentives will be high on that persons list of things to do. I'm certain that was why the Gen III was moved up in the priority over the new Roadster.
        Joeviocoe
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ashton
        That is kind of a demand issue. Getting a new type of liquid fuel to a gas station is VERY complicated and requires a whole lot of logistics to pull off.... and thus, would require a lot of demand to make worth it. A supercharger, can easily be updated with new software, and fitted with another cable/adapter for other standards. It doesn't HAVE TO draw 90KW. So with a few different models on the road, it should be easy for Tesla to adapt when they feel the need to.
      mikeybyte1
      • 2 Years Ago
      I can see Tesla adding the standard chargers, for a fee, to the stations. If anything to make other EV users feel like they are driving old tech. They are busy doing a slow standard charge that they pay for, while the Tesla cars pull in and get much more range in a shorter time. For free. It would be great indirect advertising for Tesla! Just a thought.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'm good with that. My birthday deserves that sort of hullabaloo. ٩(- ̮̮̃-̃)۶
      Ryan
      • 2 Years Ago
      California is going to be way ahead of the country. It would be nice to not care about gas prices.
        otiswild
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ryan
        I've got a Volt, and I don't really notice them about 88% of the time. Hopefully in 5-10 years battery density will get to the point where an affordable Tesla will get 400mi range and an affordable Volt will get 80-100mi electric..
          oktrader
          • 2 Years Ago
          @otiswild
          Grendal, I think you have SVX's understanding right in terms of the near future. GM would like to see the car get lighter and cheaper with more interior space while maintaining what seems to be a satisfactory electric range. (Like otis, I'm doing around 85% electron-driven and I'm OK with it.) At some point, were there in fact a 2-3x volumetric energy density improvement (and commensurate $/kW-Hr downward curve), you might see a different tilt. At that point, you might see more specific and serious talk of Akerson's 200-mi BEV.
          Grendal
          • 2 Years Ago
          @otiswild
          SVXpearlie, who seems clued into GM info, said that apparently the opposite is going to be happening in the future. The Volt will have its miles trimmed to 20-25 EV miles and the more expensive cars, like the Caddy and Buick line, will get longer distances for their packs. That's the stategy for the near future. Later, who knows. I could be wrong but I seem to remember that's what he wrote in another thread.
          Grendal
          • 2 Years Ago
          @otiswild
          It makes sense in a marketing way. They should go the Tesla route and, since the design has the battery space built into it, charge extra for longer ranges. It gives the consumer more choices. And it seems to be happening with Tesla, people just naturally want to talk themselves into the largest battery pack. Just a thought.
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ryan
        I picked up an EV. The other day I needed to get something out of the trunk of the old gasser . . . the alarm system went off because the battery was pretty much dead . LOL.
          Marco Polo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Spec
          @ Spec, Well done ! You finally made the leap, and bought an EV ! (what model ?) . I know there's something very philosophic about the dead battery, but I just can't quite figure it out.....
      Tysto
      • 2 Years Ago
      This is so great. When I think of the range this car has and the prospect of having Superchargers every 200 miles on major highways, I positively tingle. It will be really unfortunate, tho, if this technology isn't opened up to other EVs. Imagine driving your Chevy into a gas station and finding that they only have Ford gas. Or worse: Cadillac gas. They had better at least have a regular level 2 charger for other cars.
        KenZ
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Tysto
        Agree with Grendall. Eventually they would likely allow other vehicle to charge for a fee. Not only is this a (very small) source of income for them, but more importantly, if you want to target sales of your electric vehicle (Tesla), who is more likely to buy one: a random car driver off the street, or someone with an EV who just plugged into your eStation? Answer: the latter. And now, since they plugged into your station, you a) know what they're driving so you know how to target your advertising to them, and you b) have a nice LCD display where they plug in to tell them all about the advantages of upgrading to a Tesla. They are probably only allowing Teslas for now to ensure they have enough ports/capacity to handle their own customers. Give it time.
        MTN RANGER
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Tysto
        Even as a Volt owner I wouldn't expect them to support J1772. Why would Tesla spend tens of millions of dollars on free charging stations for PEVs other than their own? On the other hand, maybe they could offer J1772 and just charge for it.
          Grendal
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MTN RANGER
          In time I could see them charging a fee for other EV's. There would need to be a lower setting so they don't blow out the batteries of the other EVs however.
          Tysto
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MTN RANGER
          The Volt wouldn't benefit much from Supercharger tech, but all EVs would. The reason Tesla would support them is the usual: they can charge money for it. And it's good for PR. AND making your platform standard in the industry gives you leverage later on as others become dependent on it. Keeping all the tech for yourself guarantees slow adoption and possibly a permanent niche market. Again, where would we be today if automakers had each insisted on their cars requiring a different blend of gasoline?
          2 Wheeled Menace
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MTN RANGER
          ^--- that's what i've been saying but i got lambasted for it. Why spend a million dollars on something that works with 1 model. It's like those apple ipod.iphone accessories.
        me
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Tysto
        Sorry not us Tesla owner's problem Chevy, Ford & the rest are waaaay bigger than Tesla they could do the same thing... Go cry at them .. Can't wait to get my Module Ssssss!
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